Perceptions of “Intra-Disciplinary” Unity and Division

These “Thin Partitions:” Bridging the Growing Divide Between Cultural Anthropology and Archaeology co-edited by Joshua D. Englehardt and Ivy A. Rieger seeks to reexamine if and to what extent the sub-disciplines of Anthropology have become disjunctured. Specifically, Englehardt and Rieger sought to evaluate the historical, contemporary, and future relationship between cultural anthropologists and archaeologists. The […]

Find a Column

Knowledge Exchange >          Let’s Talk Gender Everyday Anthropology AnthroCyberism Anthropology in the Public Sector Chinese Dream Biocultural Systematics Who Cares Anthropology from the Border Middle East Muddle Endangered Cultural Artifacts and Sites Pearls á la Turca Buffalo’s Revival Name Those Bones Soldiers, Civilians and an Anthropologist The World is Curved Archaeology in […]

Building a Diverse and Inclusive Archaeology

How can we build a diverse and inclusive archaeology when the unequal access to our discipline starts at such a young age? If we want to understand the nuances of human history, we must make sure it is not about rich white people . If you run public outreach programs, I invite you to think carefully about to whom you direct these programs, and who shows up, and make a change to broaden your audience. If we each do our part, we can build a discipline that is as diverse as the past peoples that we study.

Playing with Conspiracy Theories

What might viewing conspiracism as a form of play tell us about the workings of contemporary culture, our capacity for critical thinking, or how we build new understandings?

Encounters with Lunar Dust

The stiff, gray cardboard box sat calmly on the table in the quiet NASA archive at the University of Houston Clear Lake: History Archive, Box#52, Astronomy Papers and Research. Folder 8, “Parker personal correspondence,” contained the transcript of an astronaut’s personal diary about landing on the moon.

Resisting Indigenous Erasure from Alcatraz Island to Elizabeth Warren

In the autumn of 1969, Indigenous activists captured global attention when they occupied the abandoned prison on Alcatraz Island. Their hope was to transform the site into a center for Indigenous cultural life, and for nearly two years they held the island in defiance of the federal government, bringing increased attention to the oppression of Indigenous peoples in the United States.

What Does Diversity and Inclusion Mean?

In the spirit of creating alternatives to capitalism that also recognize the importance of advocating for institutionally marginalized students, I suggest that we ask: What does diversity and inclusion mean to our departments and to our schools?