Calendar

Search here for conference announcements and calls for papers.

Do you have a meeting you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email it to ancalendar@aaanet.org.

 

May
13
Wed
SMU Southwest Puebloan Archaeology Field School
May 13 – Aug 21 all-day

Study Archaeology in Taos, New Mexico (no experience needed, financial aid available). The 2015 Southern Methodist University field school will take place at the site of T’aitöna or Pot Creek Pueblo located in the forested mountains near Taos, New Mexico. This site is an important center for population aggregation and acknowledged as an ancestral site to both the Taos and Picuris Puebloan groups. Students will carryout excavations, collect samples for dating and analysis, participate in artifact analysis, and contribute to our knowledge of the social restructuring in the northern extent of the Puebloan Southwest and in the development of later communities.

May
22
Fri
Lake Atitlan, Guatemala Ethnographic Field School
May 22 – Jul 13 all-day

Learn how to design, conduct, investigate and write-up your own independent project while living with a local family on the shores of Lake Atitlán, Guatemala. Throughout the seven and a half week program, you will learn about the Maya while developing skills in ethnographic fieldwork as you carry out your own research project. Whether you are an undergraduate, a graduate student, just finished college, learning how to collect data and talk to people is beneficial not only for those in anthropology, but also for those in many other majors, including sociology, international studies, public health, history, education, textiles, natural resource management, business and management, sociolinguistics, political science, psychology, design and civil engineering. Anyone interested is encouraged to apply, especially students interested in topics such as development, environment, globalization, social justice, tourism, conservation, language, development, poverty and health. Not sure how your interests may fit into the topics listed? Contact the program Directors, Tim Wallace (tmwallace@mindspring.com) and Chantell LaPan (cmlapan@ncsu.edu), to discuss potential opportunities for your areas of interest. Each student may choose any topic for his or her independent research project. Service learning opportunities are also possible. Visit the Guatemala Program website for more information and photos from previous years.

May
25
Mon
IEP Archaeological Field School, Peruvian Central Coast
May 25 – Aug 14 all-day

The Instituto de Estudios Peruanos (IEP), one of the most prestigious research institutions on the social sciences in Latin America, announces the fourth season of its field school in archaeological methods and laboratory analysis. The IEP now offers two programs designed to focus on the different but complementary areas of an archaeological research project: the Archaeological Field Methods Program and the Bioarchaeological Analysis Program. Field work will be done at the site of Panquilma, a 12th to 16th century prehispanic community located in the hinterland of one of the most important religious centers of the Andean coast: Pachacamac. Panquilma is a multicomponent site composed of monumental, household and funerary remains. We will be excavating a sample of each one of these components aiming to reconstruct ritual activities. Our Bioarchaeological Analysis Program offers training in statistical sampling in archaeology, ceramic analysis and cataloguing, lithic analysis and an intensive preparation in bioarchaeological analysis. Students will be trained in the processing of archaeological materials such as lithics, textiles, wooden artifacts, and botanical remains. We have at least 20 individuals that students will be able to work with for osteological analysis. Field Methods Program: May 25-June 19; June 22-July 17; July 20-August 14. Dates for the Bioarchaeology Analysis program are open; each student is able to choose when to come between December 2014 and April 2015.

May
27
Wed
Preservation Archaeology Field School in Southwest New Mexico
May 27 – Jul 5 all-day

The Preservation Archaeology Field School in southwestern New Mexico will convene from May 27 through July 5, 2015. This unique six-week program provides students with an opportunity to learn excavation, survey, and analysis methods in a beautiful, remote, and archaeologically rich part of the American Southwest. Eligible undergraduate students will receive financial support through the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program.

Our innovative curriculum highlights the goals, ethics, and practice of Preservation Archaeology, which integrates research, education, and preservation within a community-based framework. Together, students and staff explore ethically responsible and scientifically rigorous field and research methods while investigating compelling questions about our shared past.

In 2015, students will participate in test excavations at the Dinwiddie site near Cliff, New Mexico. People lived in this adobe pueblo during the Cliff phase (A.D. 1300–1450). Artifacts and architecture here show a mix of influences, perhaps including traditions originating in northeastern Arizona’s Kayenta area, or from various local Mogollon groups before 1300. At the Dinwiddie site, community members participated in a new ideology that we call Salado. Our research is focused on understanding how different earlier traditions combined under this ideology and allowed people of various cultural backgrounds to live together. Key questions include what kinds of pottery the site’s residents made and used and how this changed over time, how they used local plants and animals, and where they obtained raw material for stone tools, particularly obsidian.

The field school will begin at Archaeology Southwest’s Tucson headquarters, where students will take part in a three-day orientation to the principles of Preservation Archaeology. The remainder of the program takes place in Mule Creek, New Mexico.

Jun
13
Sat
The Birth of Europe: Excavations of the Neolithic Settlement Ilindentsi @ Prehistoric settlement near Ilindentsi, Southwestern Bulgaria
Jun 13 – Jul 12 all-day

In the seventh millennium BC the Balkan Peninsula was a gate through which farming, animal husbandry and generally Neolithisation spread to Europe from Anatolia and the Near East. Central parts of the Balkans (including the Struma River Valley) were among the most important migration routes during that period. Six Early Neolithic settlements are mapped in the small Middle Struma River Valley. One of them is the prehistoric site near Ilindentsi. During the previous excavation seasons: 2004 – 2009 and 2011 – 2014 archaeologists unearthed there remains of various Early and Middle Neolithic settlement structures and features. Among them are several dwellings: one of them with stone foundations, another one with elaborate floor construction and under-floor drainage systems and a third one completely burnt with well preserved in situ “kitchen-space” including an oven, grain-store, quern-stone, two Neolithic grave-pits: of a baby and a piglet and numerous waste pits. In 2015 the BIRTH OF EUROPE Field School Project envisions further excavation of the Neolithic dwellings and their surroundings. Two field school sessions are available and each includes the following three modules: fieldwork including excavation of the Neolithic structures, maintaining a field journal on a daily basis, filling context sheets and labels, drawing an elevation plan/ a ground plan/ a cross-section, 3D positioning of finds, taking coordinates with a total station, and taking photographs at the site; lectures, workshops and field training in Prehistoric and Field Archaeology, Finds’ Processing and Documentation as well as excursions to Blagoevgrad Regional Museum of History, the medieval town of Melnik, Rozhen Monastery and Rila Monastery (UNESCO World Heritage Site). Participants who join the two project sessions will be able to develop further their skills and competences gained during the first two-week session regarding the archaeological field work and finds’ processing; to attend: a number of extra lectures and workshops on Neolithic ceramic studies and recording and illustration of Neolithic pottery; and to join the optional excursion to Kavala, Phillippi and the Aegean coast (Greece) on 27-28 June, 2015. All participants receive a Project Handbook and the BHFS Certificate of Attendance. Optional tour of Istanbul (Turkey) prior to the field school on 6-10 June, 2015. Accommodation is in a local guest house (comfortable rooms with two to three beds + bathrooms with shower and WC, TV, Wi-Fi). Three meals (fresh, organic Bulgarian homemade food) per day are covered by the admission fee. Requests for vegetarian food are accepted. EARLY BIRD SPECIAL: December 1, 2014 – January 31, 2015 (includes 10% discount off the admission fees)! Early Bird Admission fee for one project session is 1169 EUR / app.1473 USD (please check the current exchange rates!). Early Bird Admission fee for for two project sessions is 2338 EUR / app.2946 USD USD (please check the current exchange rates!). REGULAR Admission fee after 31 January, 2015 for participation in one / two project sessions 1299 EUR /2468 EUR (app. 1637 /3110 USD). The admission fee includes educational and fieldwork activities, full-board accommodation (hotel + 3 meals per day), tools, materials, project Handbook, issue of Certificate of Attendance, excursions/sightseeing tours/entrance fees and administrative costs. Offered 6/9 credit hours for participation in one / two project sessions. Tuition: Starting from 282 EUR (app. 355 USD) for six credit hours! Check the BHFS website for details! Participants who are not interested in academic credits don’t need to pay the tuition fee.

Jun
15
Mon
Archaeological Field School at Strawbery Banke Museum @ Strawbery Banke Museum
Jun 15 – Jul 10 all-day

Take one or both of two 2-week sessions!

Session 1: June 15 – June 26; Session 2: June 29 – July 10; Monday-Friday

Course Description:  This summer’s field school will focus on recovering archaeological resources surrounding the historic Yeaton-Walsh House in advance of the house’s rehabilitation as part of the Heritage House Program.  Students will be trained in proper archaeological techniques and will learn to identify historic artifacts. Day trips, museum tours by experts, and required readings on Historical Archaeology will introduce students to various areas of historic specialization. Students will also work in the Carter Collections Center laboratory to gain experience in processing artifacts. This field school places a special emphasis on public interpretation. Students will interact with museum visitors daily, and will be expected to offer interpretation of the site and our excavation activity.

Location: Strawbery Banke Museum is an outdoor living history museum located in historic Portsmouth, NH. Strawbery Banke archaeologists have conducted some of the largest urban archaeology projects in New Hampshire. Previous excavations at Strawbery Banke have revealed information on domestic life, immigration, building traditions, pottery manufacture, and other industries, and have demonstrated that Portsmouth is one of the richest sites for historical archaeology in northern New England.

Requirements:  This field school does not require previous archaeological field experience, though an introductory course in archaeology might be helpful. Archaeological fieldwork can be demanding, and students should be able to work well as part of a team and tolerate physical activity and summer weather. If you are concerned about the requirements, please contact the instructor.

Enrollment information: To register, contact Strawbery Banke archaeologist and field school instructor Alexandra Martin at  amartin@strawberybanke.org (phone: 603-422-7521)

 

 

Jun
20
Sat
Ethnographic Fieldwork in Coastal Ecuador
Jun 20 – Aug 2 all-day

This course provides the student with the opportunity to put anthropological methods and theories into practice through participation in a supervised fieldwork situation in a village in coastal Ecuador. Doing ethnographic fieldwork is the hallmark of cultural anthropology. More than any other approach to the study of culture, it is the primary defining criterion for the disipline and its practitioners. For most anthropologists, having done fieldwork is both a fundamental rite of passage that moves one towards professional status and an important life event that in some fashion shapes the individual. This course attempts to recognize the importance of fieldwork to the student personally as well as to introduce the student to a series of methods that anthropologists use in the process of doing fieldwork and gathering data.

Jun
22
Mon
Smithsonian Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology @ Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History
Jun 22 – Jul 17 all-day

The Summer Institute in Museum Anthropology (SIMA), supported by the Smithsonian Institution and the National Science Foundation, is accepting applications for its 2015 program in Washington, DC. SIMA is a graduate student training program in museum research methods offered through the Department of Anthropology at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History. During four weeks of intensive training in seminars and hands-on workshops at the museum and an off-site collections facility, students are introduced to the scope of collections and their potential as data. Students become acquainted with strategies for navigating museum systems, learn to select methods to examine and analyze museum specimens, and consider a range of theoretical issues that collections-based research may address. In consultation with faculty, each student carries out preliminary data collection on a topic of their own choice and develops a prospectus for research to be implemented upon return to their home university. Housing and a small stipend are provided. The application deadline is March 1, 2015, and the program will run from June 22 through July 17. For more information and to apply, please visit http://anthropology.si.edu/summerinstitute/. Note: We will accept faculty fellows to develop courses in museum anthropology during SIMA 2015-2017. Please see the website for more information or contact us at SIMA@si.edu to discuss possibilities.

Jun
24
Wed
Archaeological Fieldwork in Coastal Ecuador
Jun 24 – Aug 4 all-day

The Florida Atlantic University archaeological field program is in its ninth year of operation. Unique to our program is its explicit attention to the goal of creating field archaeologists. Further, our program incorporates a multinational and multidisciplinary team of investigators. The program is oriented towards providing intensive and comprehensive training in archaeological field methods and interpretation. Students gain hands-on experience in excavation, survey, data recording, laboratory procedures, and report writing. We have accepted and trained students from accredited colleges and universities in the United States, South America, and Europe, many of whom go on to graduate work at the master’s and doctoral levels. The academic purpose of the program is to train graduate and undergraduate students in archaeological field and laboratory methods. Besides excavation and survey training, the program includes weekly lectures that focus on the process and theory of archaeological research and the prehistory of coastal Ecuador. Lectures are given by Field School instructors and guest scientists, both local and foreign. The instructor-student ratio in the field is 1:5. The program may be of special interest not only to Anthropology majors but also to Geology, Geography, or Environmental Studies students, as part of training includes topics related to the dynamics associated with long-term human use of environments and the creation of landscapes.

Jun
27
Sat
Apollonia Pontica Excavation Project 2015
Jun 27 – Jul 18 all-day

Apollonia Pontica (present-day Sozopol, Bulgria) is one of the most ancient towns on the Western Black Sea coast. It was founded by Miletian colonists in the second half of VII century BC and was one of the richest and strongest Greek Colonies in the Black Sea littoral in Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic, Late Antique and Medieval period. It was famous with the colossal statue of Apollo, the patron deity of the town, once erected in the temenos of Apollo’s temple on the island of St. Kirik. Season 2015 envisions excavations at the top of the island, in the area of the Archaic and Classical Greek and Hellenistic temples, Ancient Greek copper foundry and the Early Christian basilica and necropolis, where the excavations have been taking place since 2012. The field school comprises of the following modules: 1) fieldwork including excavations of archaeological layers and structures from Archaic, Classical, Hellenistic and Early Byzantine periods, keeping a field journal on a daily basis, filling out context sheets and labels, drawing ground plans and cross-sections, 3D positioning of finds, taking coordinates with a level device, taking photographs at the site, etc.; 2) lectures on Ancient Greek and Field Archaeology; 3) workshops on finds’ processing including pottery cleaning, sorting, drawing, conservation and restoration as well as flotation of soil samples; 4) excursion to Nesebar (UNESCO World Heritage Site) and visits to archaeological sites in Sozopol. The participants who attend either the three-week session (3) or the two project sessions (1&2) will be able to develop further their skills and competences regarding the archaeological field work and finds’ processing, gained during the first two-week session and to attend a number of extra lectures and workshops and an excursion to the natural megalithic and archaeological complex of Begliktash. The participants who attend the two project sessions (1&2) will take part in the workshop for conservation and restoration of Greek pottery. The participants could join a 5-day trip to Istanbul, Turkey after the field school for an additional fee. All participants receive a project handbook and a certificate of attendance. Accommodation is in a centrally located hotel (5 min. walking distance from the beaches, the Old Town Quarter and the Archaeological Museum) with comfortable rooms (two to three beds), bathrooms with shower and WC, equipped with air-conditioning, TV and free Wi-Fi – some 15 min walking distance from the archaeological site. Three meals per day are covered by the admission fee. Three meals per day are covered by the admission fee. EARLY BIRD SPECIAL: December 1, 2014 – January 31, 2015 (includes 10% discount off the admission fees)! Early Bird Admission fee for one project session is 1259 EUR* / app.1586 USD (check current exchange rates!) Early Bird Admission fee for session 3 is 1889 EUR* / app. 2380 USD (check current exchange rates!) Early Bird Admission fee for for two project sessions is 2518 EUR* / app. 3173 USD. (check current exchange rates!) REGULAR Admission fee after 31 January, 2015 for participation in two/ three/ four-week project sessions is 1399 EUR /2099 EUR/ 2658 EUR (app. 1763 / 2645/ 3349 USD). The admission fee includes educational and fieldwork activities, full-board accommodation (hotel + 3 meals per day), tools, materials, project Handbook, issue of Certificate of Attendance; excursions/sightseeing tours/entrance fees and administrative costs. 6/9 credit hours for participation in one / two project sessions. Tuition: Starting from 282 EUR (app. 355 USD) for six credit hours! Check the BHFS website for details! Participants who are not interested in academic credits don’t need to pay the tuition fee.