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Do you have a meeting you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email it to ancalendar@americananthro.org.

 

May
2
Mon
Call for Applications- Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards for African Studies
May 2 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

IVAN KARP DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARDS

FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN

SOUTH AFRICAN Ph.D. PROGRAMS

Closing Date: Monday 2 May 2016

 

The African Critical Inquiry Programme is pleased to announce the 2016 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards to support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled at South African universities and conducting dissertation research on relevant topics. Grant amounts vary depending on research plans, with a maximum award of ZAR 40,000.

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

 

ELIGIBILITY: The Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards are open to African postgraduate students (regardless of citizenship) in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Applicants must be currently registered in a Ph.D. programme in a South African university and be working on topics related to ACIP’s focus. Awards will support doctoral research projects focused on topics such as institutions of public culture, particular aspects of museums and exhibitions, forms and practices of public scholarship, culture and communication, and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Applicants must submit a dissertation proposal that has been approved by their institution to confirm the award; this must be completed before they begin ACIP-supported on-site research or by December 2016, whichever comes first.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS: Awards are open to proposals working with a range of methodologies in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, including research in archives and collections, fieldwork, interviews, surveys, and quantitative data collection. Applicants are expected to write in clear, intelligible prose for a selection committee that is multi-disciplinary and cross-regional. Proposals should show thorough knowledge of the major concepts, theories, and methods in the applicant’s discipline and in other related fields and include a bibliography relevant to the research. Applicants should specify why an extended period of on-site research is essential to successfully complete the proposed doctoral dissertation. Guidance and advice on how to write a good proposal and budget can be found in the Resources section of the ACIP website (http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html) or here: http://www.ssrc.org/publications/view/the-art-of-writing-proposals/.

To apply, eligible applicants should submit the following:

  • completed cover sheet (form below and online at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  • abstract of the proposed research project (250 words maximum)
  • research proposal outlining the project’s goals, central questions and significance, and its relevance for ACIP’s central concerns. Proposals should include a clearly formulated, realistic research design and a plan of work responsive to the project’s theoretical and methodological concerns. Applicants should provide evidence of appropriate training to undertake the proposed research, including the language fluency necessary for the project. Proposals should be no longer than 5 pages; they should be double spaced, with one inch margins and a font no smaller than 11 point.
  • bibliography of up to two additional pages
  • project budget listing and justifying project expenses to be supported by the award
  • your curriculum vitae
  • current transcript
  • two referee letters; one of these must be from your supervisor. Your referees should comment specifically on your proposed project, its quality and significance, and your qualifications for undertaking it. They might also evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of your project and how you and your work would benefit from receiving the research award. Referee letters should be submitted directly to the selection committee.

Funding is to be used for on-site dissertation research; research cannot be at the applicant’s home institution unless that institution has necessary site-specific research holdings not otherwise available to the applicant. Applicants who have completed significant funded dissertation research by the start of their proposed ACIP research may be ineligible to apply to extend research time. Eligibility will be at the discretion of the ACIP Selection Committee, depending on completed research time and funding. Please note that the Ivan Karp Dissertation Research Awards support dissertation research only and may not be used for dissertation write-up, study at other universities, conference participation, or to reimburse debts or expenses for research already completed. The program does not accept applications from Ph.D. programs in Law, Business, Medicine, Nursing, or Journalism, nor does it accept applications in doctoral programs that do not lead to a Ph.D.

 

SELECTION PROCESS: Applications will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee, an interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners drawn from a range of universities and cultural institutions. Selection will be based on the merit and strength of the application. Award amounts will vary according to project needs; the maximum award is ZAR 40,000. Awards will be made only if applications of high quality are received. Notification of awards will be made by late July.

Successful applicants will be required to attend the African Critical Inquiry Workshop in the following year and will have opportunities to consult with scholars associated with the Workshop. They will be expected to attend subsequent ACIP Workshops while completing their dissertations, if possible. After completing their research, applicants must submit a final research report and a financial report.

Students who receive an Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award from the African Critical Inquiry Programme must acknowledge the support in any publications resulting from the research and in their dissertation. When the dissertation is completed, they must deposit a copy with the African Critical Inquiry Programme at the Center for Humanities Research.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received on or before Monday 2 May 2016. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

 

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2016 Research Award Application” to lameezlalkhen@gmail.com.

 

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund

http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html

https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

AFRICAN CRITICAL INQUIRY PROGRAMME

2016 IVAN KARP DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARDS

FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN

SOUTH AFRICAN Ph.D. PROGRAMS

 

To apply for an Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award, complete this cover sheet and submit it with:

  • an abstract of the proposed research project (250 words maximum)
  • a research proposal no longer than 5 pages, double spaced, with one inch margins and font no smaller than 11 point
  • a bibliography of up to two additional pages
  • a project budget justifying project expenses to be supported
  • your curriculum vitae
  • a current transcript
  • Two referee letters should be submitted directly to the selection committee by email to lameezlalkhen@gmail.com. One must be from your supervisor.

Please email your application as a single file with material in the above order to lameezlalkhen@gmail.com. The closing date for applications is Monday 2 May 2016.

 

NAME:

 

EMAIL:        PHONE:

 

MAILING ADDRESS:

 

NATIONALITY:

 

ARE YOU CURRENTLY ENROLLED IN A PhD PROGRAMME IN A SOUTH AFRICAN UNIVERSITY (check one)?  Yes    No

 

UNIVERSITY:

 

PhD PROGRAMME/DEPARTMENT:

 

YEAR OF STUDY IN THE PROGRAMME:

 

NAME AND POSITION OF SUPERVISOR:

 

NAME AND POSITION OF SECOND REFEREE:

 

TITLE OF RESEARCH PROJECT:

 

LOCATION OF RESEARCH PROJECT:

 

TOTAL RESEARCH SUPPORT REQUESTED:

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition
May 2 all-day

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology announces that we are opening our annual writing contest which celebrates and encourages the use of creative literary genres to explore anthropological concerns associated with any field of anthropology. This year we are expanding our ethnographic fiction competition to include the literary genres of creative nonfiction as well as fiction.

As a guideline, ethnographic fiction and creative nonfiction use literary elements to bring stories to life and engage the reader. Whether fiction or nonfiction, these creative prose pieces reflect insights about the real world seen through an anthropological lens or reflecting an anthropological sensibility.

Submissions should not exceed 20 pages typed double-spaced, and need to work as stand-alone stories. There is a limit of one submission per applicant.

We do expect contestants to be affiliated with the field or practice of anthropology and/or ethnography in some manner. There is no entry fee for this competition. Submission deadline is May 2, 2016.

Please email your entry as two pdf documents to: shafictioncompetition@gmail.com 

The entry should consist of two files:

  1. Your story (double spaced) with title but without the author’s name (anonymized), PLUS an extra final page with a statement of no more than 400 words that answers the question “how is this creative piece anthropologically informed and in what ways has your background in the field contributed to it?” This statement will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections.
  2. A separate cover page with your full name, title of your submission, mailing address, email address, and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

JUDGES: Julia Offen (Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Editor, Anthropology and Humanism), Jessica Falcone (Associate Professor, Kansas State University), and John Wood (Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville)

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized in a ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Minneapolis in November 2016.

Winning submissions will be considered for publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. All winners will receive a certificate, and the first place winner will receive an award of $100.

CFP: To Organize a Workshop – African Critical Inquiry Programme
May 2 all-day

 

Closing Date: Monday 2 May 2016

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organize a workshop to take place in 2017. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular notions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational or institutional forms from methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that brings into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

 

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energize conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organizations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organizations, NGOs or others appropriate to the topic.

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2017.
  • a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  • a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  • a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organizers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape. CHR will usually be the venue for Workshops, though applications may propose and justify alternate locations and modes of administrative support. CHR is responsible for financial administration and Workshop organizers are responsible for complying with CHR policies.

We ask Workshop organizers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organizers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organizations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches or specializations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply: Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  • abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement of the nature and significance of the proposed Workshop theme and focus, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organizing the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organizer)
  • if the proposed Workshop will not be held at UWC, please include an institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop and describe available administrative and logistical support in your plan of work
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organization, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

 

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

 

Conceptualization: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross-institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

 

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

 

Workshop organizer(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organizing the Workshop, including previous administration/organization and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

 

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

Applicants who organize an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research. After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

 

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Monday 2 May 2016. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

 

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2017 Workshop Proposal” to lameezlalkhen@gmail.com.

 

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund

http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html  

https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

 

May
4
Wed
IUAES Inter-Congress 2016
May 4 – May 9 all-day

IUAES Inter-Congress 2016

4th – 9th May 2016, Dubrovnik, Croatia

MAIN TOPIC: World anthropologies and privatization of knowledge: engaging anthropology in public

As ethnological and anthropological sciences encompass an abundance of different research fields and perspectives, panels will be allocated to main tracks:

  • World anthropologies: peripheries strike back
  • Privatization of knowledge, technologies, and nature
  • Engagement and practice: publicizing and using anthropology/Bringing anthropology to the people: how can science contribute to everyday lives
  • Varieties reconsidered: biocultural challenges for anthropology
  • Anthropological responsibilities
  • Managing cultural and linguistic diversity and social inequality
  • Human genetics – costs and benefits
  • Human evolution: past, present and future
  • Anthropological knowledge and environmental challenges
  • Improving health, well-being and quality of life

 

Call for panels is open until September 30th 2015 (online submission of panels at http://www.iuaes201.com

Call for papers will be launched in November 2015.

Venue of the Congress:  Dubrovnik hotel Palace, Croatia.

Brief summary:

It is our great pleasure to invite you to attend the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences’s (IUAES) Inter-Congress World anthropologies and privatization of knowledge: engaging anthropology in public to be held in Dubrovnik, from 4th to 9th May 2016.

The scientific program of the Inter-Congress is intended to provide participants with an opportunity to discuss and develop a comprehensive insight into the diversity of ways in which scientific research and scholarship can be, has been or will be employed to understand and engage in social processes and to consider the various risks brought about by new technologies, global economic development, changes in the world’s demographic structure and the increased complexity of managing contemporary societies. In particular, it will consider the extent to which and how privatization of knowledge has become a serious global socio-political threat.

We will welcome you in Dubrovnik, one of the most beautiful cities in the world, a radiant city that features stunning architecture and a vibrant cultural life.

May
9
Mon
Florida State University Archaeological Field School 2016 @ St. Mark’s National Wildlife Refuge
May 9 – Jun 17 all-day

The Maritime Woodland Along the Florida Gulf Coast – Florida State University Archaeological Field School 2016

 

The Florida State University Archaeological Field School represents an apprenticeship in archaeological research design, field methods, artifact processing, organizational and management concepts, and public outreach. It is an entry-level preparation for students who are considering a career in archaeology or desire archaeological field training. Students will have the opportunity to learn and practice survey techniques, site survey and subsurface testing, excavation skills, preparation of cultural materials, public outreach activities via the project blog, and involvement in the organizational and logistic requirements of staging and operating a field project. Students will be introduced to, and work with, various types of surveying, photographic, video, and computer equipment during the course of the field school. An important component of all modern archaeology projects is public outreach and education.

Students will be involved in this aspect of the project via scheduled volunteer and special service days and the project blog. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about cultural resource management by federal agencies, federal and state cultural resource laws, and network with archaeologists from federal and state agencies.

In summer 2016 we will investigate subsistence and ceremonialism at a maritime Woodland Period (ca. 3200 – 1000 years ago) shell ring site located in the St. Mark’s National Wildlife Refuge, approximately 25 miles south of Tallahassee, Florida (we will commute daily from the campus of FSU).

The fieldwork runs May 9-June 17 and is co-directed by Dr. Tanya M. Peres and Dr. Geoffrey P. Thomas.

Please follow the link to submit an application. http://goo.gl/forms/SDgeX7PmRp

May
11
Wed
Canadian Anthropology Society & Society for the Anthropology of North America Conference @ Dalhousie University
May 11 – May 15 all-day
The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival @ Eugene Hilton and Conference Center
May 11 – May 15 all-day

If you have an interest in how the media portrays archaeology,  we are planning the gathering for you that will take place May 11-15, 2016.  This event, The Archaeology Channel Conference on Cultural Heritage Media, takes place in connection with our annual juried film competition, The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival.

At this point in time, the media world is in a state of flux because of developments in audiovisual technology and a widespread exploration of and experimentation in new media.  Professional disciplines such as archaeology and education are searching for the best uses of media to convey their messages and information to students and other members of the public.  Filmmakers are testing new ways to put their productions in front of audiences and the public is diversifying the ways by which they experience film, video and audio programming.  Old media business models are losing their effectiveness in the new media environment, so producers are exploring new ways toward financial viability.  We see an opportunity and a need here to bring together a diverse array of cultural heritage media stakeholders worldwide in one place at one time to have a big conversation about the future of this genre.

The Conference is a unique international meeting of diverse people and organizations with an interest in cultural heritage media.  Our goal is to create an unparalleled worldwide networking opportunity for cultural heritage filmmakers and others interested in the making and uses of cultural heritage media, including broadcasters, distributors, archaeologists, indigenous groups, musicians, artists, tourism operators, journalists, educators, historic preservation organizations, and others.

Why should you take part in this event?  Consider what you can do here:

  • Stop complaining about media portrayals of archaeology and do something about it.
  • Get familiar with media people and the media process.
  • Play a concrete role in shaping media to deliver the true messages of archaeology.
  • Help archaeology take a leading role in media programming development.
  • Share your ideas through a professional paper, symposium or forum.
  • Be part of the group that spawned a new vision for cultural heritage media in the 21st Century.

Early feedback indicates that this Conference will be well attended and dynamic, bringing together many of the leading global stakeholders in audiovisual media for cultural heritage.  We hope you can join them.

The deadline for Conference abstract submissions is October 31, 2015.  The deadline for Festival film submissions is October 15, 2015.  Please visit the Conference page, submit your registration and plan to take part.

May
12
Thu
Cultural Sustainability in the Age of Globalization Symposium @ Rasmuson Theater, National Museum of the American Indian
May 12 @ 8:30 am – 3:00 pm

May 12, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Rasmuson Theater, National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.

The Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, the Alliance for California Traditional Arts, and the Royal Textile Academy of Bhutan will host a one-day symposium exploring exemplary efforts to sustain local artistic practices and cultural identities in the face of ever-accelerating globalization.

As international trade and investment, immigration/migration, and technologies touch the lives of almost everyone, the world is increasingly understood and experienced as a single place. People afflicted by human conflicts and natural disasters engage traditional arts practices and values to serve as social rallying forces that enable effective group self-determination.

Within this vast context, individuals and communities strive to sustain the expressive cultures that matter most to them and to maintain and strengthen a sense of social cohesion. In the process, they are generating innovative strategies for cultural sustainability and safeguarding their living cultural heritage.

Beyond the inherent value of their art and heritage, participation in traditional arts activates cultural assets that promote individual well-being and public health. Moreover, cultural heritage plays an increasingly important role in economic development, both through the growing artisan sector and cultural heritage tourism.

Schedule

8:30 a.m. — Gathering for coffee and tea

9:00 — Welcome by Smithsonian Secretary Dr. David Skorton

9:15 — Speaker: Queen Mother of Bhutan

  • Her Majesty Ashi Sangay Choden Wangchuck

9:30 — Panel: Cultural Heritage and Wellbeing

10:30 — Speaker: Angelique Kidjo

11:00 — Panel: Cultural and Economic Sustainability

12:00 p.m. — Lunch

1:30 — Panel: Cultural Sustainability and Revitalization

2:30 — Speaker: Maria Rosario Jackson, Claremont Graduate U

No registration is necessary for the symposium. If you have any questions, please email folklife@si.edu.

May
15
Sun
Archaeological Summer School in Abruzzo, Italy 2016
May 15 all-day

The Archaeological summer school in Abruzzo (Italy) 2016 is a four-week course organized in collaboration with Soprintendenza Archeologia dell’Abruzzo and with the important support of other research centers for Mediterranean studies: ICCOM-CNR U.O.S. of Pisa, Institute for Mediterranean Studies (IMS) of Crete and INGV of Roma.

The aim of our intensive course is to increase awareness and competencies about archaeological and methodological issues through an intensive four weeks program of lectures, laboratory and field activities.

 Essential Information about the Summer School:

–          >School activities will  be carried out in Abruzzo, one of the most beautiful region in central Italy.

–       School dates: July 11th to August 7th, 2016 (deadline May 15)

–     Field activities will be carried out in two important sites: Colle Santo Stefano (Neolithic period) and Alba Fucens (Roman site),  in order to provide students with in-depth knowledge of techniques and methodologies of modern archaeological research.

–          Our program give to any participant 10 ECTS (European academic system)*and is open to undergraduate, graduate and post graduate students.

–      To apply is necessary to fill and send the application form (downloadable from the website).

*For non-European students is the administrative office of their University liable for  transfer and recognizing of credits.  In case of need, the administrative office can ask for documents, necessary to facilitate credits transfer, to the Support Summer School office of Pisa University. (Support Summer School office: support.summerschool@adm.unipi.it).

Institutional Development Grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation
May 15 all-day

Institutional Development Grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation

The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research established the Institutional Development Grant (IDG) program in 2008. The IDG is intended to strengthen (or to support the development of) anthropological doctoral programs in countries where the discipline is underrepresented. The grant provides $25,000 per year, is renewable for a maximum of five years (total support of $125,000), and may be used for any purpose to achieve the academic development goals of the applicant department. A minimum of one new award will be made each year, and applicant departments are expected to have developed strong partnership arrangements with other anthropological institutions that can help them achieve their development goals.

Since the program’s inauguration, nine institutions have received IDG grants: The Central Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tribhuvan University, Nepal; The Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at Mongolian National University; The Museo Antropologia, National University of Cordoba, Argentina; The Anthropological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Philippines; The Department of Anthropology, Vietnam, National University, Hanoi, Vietnam; The Department of Social Anthropology, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia; The Faculté d’Ethnologie at Université d’Etat d’Haiti, Port-Au-Prince, Haiti; The Baltic States – University of Latvia, Riga Stradins University (Latvia), University of Tallinn (Estonia)  and Vytautus Magnus University (Lithuania); and the Royal Thimphu College, Royal University of Bhutan, Thimphu, Bhutan.

The Institutional Development Grant has a two-stage application process: the submission of a preliminary inquiry, followed by the submission of a full application. The deadline for the mandatory preliminary inquiry is May 15, 2016. The preliminary inquiry must be submitted using the preliminary inquiry form, which can be downloaded from the Wenner-Gren website, at http://www.wennergren.org/programs/institutional-development-grants. The deadline for those applicants invited to submit a full application is September 15, 2016. Awards will be announced in November 2016 for programs beginning in January 2017.

General inquiries:  inquiries@wennergren.org

Institutional Development Grant inquiries:   development@wennergren.org