Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Nov
20
Tue
2019-20 Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity Program
Nov 20 all-day

The deadline for applications to the 2019-20 Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is 20 November 2018. Please help us spread the news about this programme, which brings activists and social change leaders from around the world to LSE’s International Inequalities Institute. (See below for easily shareable info)

The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme allows fellows to work with leading scholars, practitioners and civil society organisations. In its first two years, AFSEE has brought together 40 change-makers from Africa, Asia, Oceania, Europe and North and South America. Most AFSEE participants have not previously had access to a major fellowship or scholarship, and all have spent seven to ten years fighting inequality in fields such as human rights, environmental activism, community and labour organising, transparency and governance, gender and disability rights, civic and democratic engagement, journalism, public health, social policy and peace and reconciliation.

The programme has both residential and non-residential tracks, with residential fellows completing the LSE’s MSc in Inequalities and Social Science, and non-residential fellows participating in four AFSEE modules in London and Cape Town over one year. AFSEE is one of seven Atlantic Fellows programmes worldwide, and is supported by The Atlantic Philanthropies via a 20-year grant that will fund the creation of a 600-strong cohort of lifelong fellows.

Find out more about the programme here: http://afsee.atlanticfellows.org/apply
View our video here: https://youtu.be/EkENioZIWAQ

Share one of our social media posts:
Twitter: (our account is @LSEInequalities)
https://twitter.com/LSEInequalities/status/1059070337432911875

LinkedIn (our account is https://www.linkedin.com/company/atlantic-fellows-for-social-and-economic-equity/) https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6462975838387212288

Facebook (our account is @LSEInequalities)
https://www.facebook.com/LSEInequalities/photos/a.897626197040299/1471391486330431

Nov
30
Fri
Beta Analytic’s First Ever Carbon-14 Date Raffle
Nov 30 all-day

Radiocarbon Date Raffle

To support young researchers around the world, we are giving away vouchers for five AMS dates.

Eligibility: Open to all undergrad and postgrad researchers

Allowed number of entries per student: 1

Selection Process: Random Draw

Number of Winners: 5 (1 student from a university in Europe, 1 in Asia Pacific, 1 in Africa, 1 in South America and 1 in North America)

About the Prize:

Prize: 1 standard AMS date worth US$595 (standard turnaround time of 14 business days, valid until December 31, 2019)

Vouchers are non-transferrable.

Winners are required to show proof of enrollment for any semester in 2018.

Important Dates:

Deadline to join: November 30, 2018

Announcement of winners: December 10, 2018

Winners will be notified by email on December 10, 2018. This page will also be updated to add the names of the 5 winners.

Questions: Email [email protected]

Beta Analytic’s Privacy Policy is found here.

CFP: SLACA Spring 2019 Conference
Nov 30 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS & POSTERS
SLACA SPRING 2019 CONFERENCE
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
April 11-13, 2019

Featuring Keynote Kearney Lecture by Dr. Yarimar Bonilla (Rutgers)

Reconstructions: Material, Political, and Theoretical Renovations

 

Reconstructions is an invitation to consider the ways in which anthropology has been involved in ongoing processes of building and rebuilding Latin America and the Caribbean both materially and intellectually. As the title suggests, we understand reconstruction as a form of renovation that includes the transformation of material and political landscapes, the renewal of intellectual trends and discussions, and recent engagements with old and new issues. Reconstruction also suggests that we look beyond deconstruction and reflect on how Latin America and the Caribbean are sites of constant debate on the reconstruction of their past legacies and future directions.

The Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology (SLACA) welcomes paper and poster submissions under the conference theme Reconstructions. We invite theoretical and empirical analyses that address reconstruction in Latin America and the Caribbean. We particularly encourage members to submit abstracts dealing with the reconstruction/renovation of the following: borders (materially and symbolically); national and regional identities; material landscapes impacted by climate change, natural disaster, and political mobilizations; legal and judicial systems; and racial, ethnic, class, and gender politics.

Submission of abstracts must be done through SLACA’s website. Please visit http://slaca.americananthro.org to submit your abstract on or before November 30th, 2018. Should you have questions, please contact the conference organizing committee at: [email protected]. Detailed information about the conference venue, hotel accommodations, and conference program activities will be made available on the SLACA website.

 

Conference Fees

  • $80  Members from the United States, Canada, and Europe
  • $50  Members from Latin America
  • $30  Students

 

Conference Format

We are limiting the number of papers to no more than 40 in order to assure that there are no concurrent sessions on the conference theme. Posters and papers can be written in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and English. However, because the meetings are in a Spanish-speaking locale, presentations in Spanish will reach more people and are encouraged.

 

Important dates and deadlines

  • November 30, 2018        Deadline for submission of abstracts
  • January 14, 2019            Confirmation of acceptance
  • February 1, 2019            Confirmation of participation
  • April 11-13, 2019            Conference in Santo Domingo, D.R.

 

Selection procedure

The Conference Committee will select 30-40 papers to be presented at the conference’s thematic sessions on April -11-13, 2019. To ensure one’s participation, the committee must receive confirmation of participation no later than February 1, 2019. Participation is contingent on confirmation.

 

Conference Organizing Committee

  • Ricardo Pérez, SLACA Councilor (Bi-Annual Meeting Chair, 2015-18)
  • Iván Sandoval Cervantes, SLACA Councilor (Bi-Annual Meeting Chair, 2018-21)
  • Ronda Brulotte, SLACA President
  • Luisa Rollins Castillo, SLACA Councilor
  • Joseph Feldman, SLACA Member
Graduate Fellowship in Diversity and Inclusion: Boise State University Anthropology Department
Nov 30 all-day

Announcing the Boise State University Anthropology Department

Graduate Fellowship in Diversity and Inclusion, Academic Year 2019-20

The Department of Anthropology at Boise State University values diversity and is committed to building a more diverse and inclusive presence for tomorrow’s professionals in the discipline. We are pleased to announce our Graduate Fellowship in Diversity and Inclusion for Academic Year 2019-20. Our Master’s program in Anthropology welcomes applications from prospective domestic graduate students, who identify in traditionally underrepresented groups (specifically Black/African American, Hispanic American, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Native Pacific Islander, per the Graduate College at Boise State University).

 

Why choose Boise State Anthropology? Please read on!

Our Focus.

Boise State Anthropology is a regional hub for evolutionary anthropology where students pursue original research in archaeology, biological anthropology, and human behavioral ecology.
 

Our Scope.

Our student project opportunities include fieldwork in global settings including Africa and Asia, analyzing large scale national and international datasets, analysis of skeletal remains, and archaeological investigations across the Northwest, among others.

 

Our Support.

The Graduate Fellowship in Diversity and Inclusion provides full financial support, including a $15,000 per year stipend, registration fees, out-of-state tuition waiver, and health insurance. The awardee is eligible for two years of support pursuant to satisfactory progress.

 

Our Options.

Pursue one of two options designed to maximize your competitiveness in the field through

building strong scientific and methodological expertise.

  1. A thesis-based Master’s degree in Anthropology (Masters of Arts) with a focus on human behavioral ecology or archaeology that prepares you for future Ph.D. level research. With an M.A. in Anthropology, students have the option of applying for the Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at Boise State University.
  2. A project-based Master’s degree in Applied Anthropology that builds scientific archaeology and management expertise for marketability in the public and private cultural resources management sectors.

 

Our Record of Success.

Our graduates are employed across the country in the federal sector as cultural resource managers, as experts in non-governmental organizations worldwide, as instructors in higher education, and in private industry. Boise State Anthropology students also pursue PhD research nationwide.

Please submit a letter of query to prospective mentors in the Department of Anthropology by November 30.  Full applications are due January 15.  Visit anthropology.boisestate.edu for more details about our program, prospective mentors, and opportunities.

Dec
1
Sat
CFP: Sinophone Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Critical Reflections
Dec 1 all-day

Call for Papers: Sinophone Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Critical Reflections

April 12-13, 2019

University of California, Los Angeles
Organized by Professor Shu-mei Shih (UCLA)
Deadline: December 1, 2018

Website: http://international.ucla.edu/apc/article/197181

 

Since the initial conceptualization of Sinophone studies over a decade ago as a field that examines Sinitic-language cultures and communities marked by difference and heterogeneity around the world, scholarly work in the field has become more and more interdisciplinary, involving not only literary and cinema studies, but also history, anthropology, musicology, linguistics, art history, dance, and others. Now we routinely see “Sinophone” as a specific marker with multiple implications that are no longer merely denotative, enabling, on the one hand, marginalized voices, sites, and practices to come into view, and, on the other hand, an expanded conversation with such fields as postcolonial studies, settler colonial studies, immigration studies, ethnic studies, queer studies, and area studies. There have been vibrant debates at the definitional and conceptual level about critical issues and standpoints, such as the pros and cons of the diasporic framework (diaspora as history versus diaspora as value), the difficulty of overcoming Chineseness, the strength and pitfalls of language-determined identities, imperial and anti-imperial politics, racialization and self-determination of minority peoples, place-based cultural practices, the dialectics between roots and routes, and many others, and presently, scholars in disciplines other than literary and cinema studies have begun to join these conversations. The increasingly interdisciplinary nature of Sinophone studies compels us to take stock, at this particular historical conjuncture, of where this inherently interdisciplinary field has been, where it is going, and where it might go in the future.

The conference calls for paper proposals that engage with the broad contours of Sinophone studies as described above with the aim of gathering selected conference papers into a new reader entitled Sinophone Studies: An Interdisciplinary Reader, after the 2013 volume, Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader (Columbia UP). The 2013 volume was largely limited to literary and cultural studies, and the current volume in preparation will give preference to disciplines that are not yet represented in the 2013 volume as well as more conceptual and theoretical essays that elaborate upon Sinophone studies as an interdisciplinary field and the ways in which Sinophone studies has reframed existing discussions and challenged specific centrisms and boundaries.

Please send your paper proposal of no more than 300 words to Kunxian Shen at [email protected] by December 1, 2018. Notifications of proposal acceptance will be sent by December 15 to allow presenters time to apply for travel funding. Full papers are expected for delivery at the conference. The conference organizers will provide lodging, refreshments, and some meals, but will not be able to cover travel expenses. Conference registration is free.

Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy Research Grant in the Social Sciences
Dec 1 all-day

The Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy was established in 1997 to support the advancement of research and understanding in the major fields of the social sciences, which include psychology, anthropology, sociology, economics, urban affairs, area studies, and political science.

Through its grants program, the foundation awards grants of $7,500 — $5,000 at the start of the project and $2,500 at its completion — to Ph.D. candidates in support of dissertations that address contemporary issues in the social sciences. Special Awards are offered to grant recipients for the most outstanding research project in specific subject-matter areas. Recipients of these awards receive an additional $1,500 – $5,000.

Applicants are not required to be a citizen or resident of the United States; however, grants are limited to aspiring PhD students at the dissertation level whose project has received approval from their appropriate department head/university

Request for Proposals: The Self, Virtue, and Public Life
Dec 1 all-day

RFP: “The Self, Virtue, and Public Life”

OVERVIEW

The University of Oklahoma, with a generous grant from the Templeton Religion Trust, is pleased to announce a Request for Proposals (RFP) on the topics of “The Self, Virtue, and Public Life.” The full RFP is available at: https://selfvirtueandpubliclife.com/initiatives/grants/.

Approximately ten research proposals at approximately $190,000 each will be funded through this initiative. This international grant competition has three primary aims:

  1. To support innovative research on the self, virtue, and public life.
  2. To encourage methodological innovation in the study of the self, virtue, and public life.
  3. To encourage interdisciplinary teamwork, specifically between social sciences and humanities, though scientists from other areas, such as neuroscience and the health sciences, are also welcome to apply with collaborators from the humanities.

A subsidiary aim is to support scholars who are new to the investigation of these topics or have not received funding elsewhere. Research collaborations between younger and more established scholars are especially encouraged. The central research themes we seek to explore through this RFP can be framed at the level of the civic virtues of individuals, as well as at the level of institutions. For a list of possible research questions, please see the full RFP.

 

DEEP INTEGRATION

Research into character and virtue is often conducted by scholars within a single disciplinary perspective – philosophers research by themselves, psychologists team up with each other, historians and anthropologists proceed from their own disciplinary perspectives. This disciplinary isolationism is not maximally productive of new knowledge about virtue. To ensure that research funded by this proposal closes the disciplinary gap, funded research teams must meet the requirement of “deep integration,” as explained in the full RFP (https://selfvirtueandpubliclife.com/initiatives/grants/).

 

APPLICATION PROCESS

Awards are intended to support research from August 1, 2019, through May 31, 2021. Letters of intent are due no later than December 1, 2018 at 11:59 PM, and must be submitted via an online portal linked to the project website. Full proposals are by invitation only and are due no later than March 15, 2019, at 11:59 PM. Further information is available in the full RFP, on our project website, and by contacting us by e-mail.

 

Project Website: http://www.selfvirtueandpubliclife.com

Full Request for Proposals: https://selfvirtueandpubliclife.com/initiatives/grants/

Contact Email: [email protected]

Dec
3
Mon
2019 Franklin Research Grants
Dec 3 all-day

Scope

This program of small grants to scholars is intended to support the cost of research leading to publication in all areas of knowledge. The Franklin program is particularly designed to help meet the cost of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses.

Eligibility

Applicants are expected to have a doctorate or to have published work of doctoral character and quality. Ph.D. candidates are not eligible to apply, but the Society is especially interested in supporting the work of young scholars who have recently received the doctorate.

Award

From $1,000 to $6,000.

Deadlines

October 1, December 3; notification in January and March.

Application

The application may be accessed at https://www.amphilsoc.org/grants/franklin-research-grants. Questions should be directed to Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, at [email protected] or 215-440-3429.

Dec
4
Tue
AAS2018: Life in an Age of Death
Dec 4 – Dec 7 all-day

AAS2018: LIFE IN AN AGE OF DEATH

4-7 December, 2018

James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia

During the first decades of the twenty-first century, the proliferation of life as a generative possibility has become marked by the spectre of death, closure, denial and ends. Ours is an era of precarity, extinction, militarised inequality, a seemingly boundless war on terror, the waning legitimacy of human rights, a rising consciousness of animal cruelty and consumer complicity in killing and suffering, and the global closure of decolonial and socialist windows of emancipation. Artificial intelligence and post-human technology-flesh interventions have become sources of existential threat to be secured against, rather than means of freeing, or otherwise expanding life. Mbembe (2003) first developed the notion of necropolitics in relation to ‘assemblages of death’, zones where technology, economy and social structures bind together to reproduce patterns of extreme violence. Following Foucault, he envisaged a distribution of the world into life zones and death zones. While we can readily identify zones of life and death on these terms, the imaginaries of death have increasingly colonised life zones.

This conference seeks to embrace this moment in history in all its roiling complexity, challenge, and specificity. It asks what accounts for this current interest in the spectre of Death in the anthropological imagination? What sorts of life—social, cultural, technological, creative—emerge in spaces pregnant with death and other life-ending spectres? What new horizons of fear, hope and possibility emerge? What kinds of new social formations, subjectivities and cultural imaginaries?

What social and cultural forms might an affirmative biopolitics, where the power of life is regained from the spectre of death, take? What new strategies of engagement, activism and refusal?

What can anthropology specifically bring to these emergent and often-interdisciplinary zones of urgency? How might our methods, theories and orientations be re-tooled and re-energised for these shadowed times?

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Refugee camp life, detention centres, border zones
  • New interspecies alliances
  • Securitisation of the internet of things
  • Agriculture and food in relation to animal cruelty and environmental degradation
  • Militarisation of urban space and zones of expulsion
  • Affective ecologies
  • Terms of the biopolitical across species, taxa
  • Aging populations
  • Securitising life, normalised insecurity
  • The medical body and social body technologies
  • Death of the fight for the internet
  • Reimagining the museum
  • Mediated death and the digital
  • Indigenous deathscapes
  • Posthuman experiments in and experiences of technology in the flesh
  • Autonomous systems
  • Memory, affect and imaginaries of life
  • Affirmative and critical biopolitics

For further information please see:

https://www.aasconf.org/2018/call-for-panels

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Panels and roundtables: 5 April to 7 May
Call for Papers, Labs: 21 May to 22 June
Early Bird registration opens: 10 August
Standard registration opens: 29 September

InterAsian Connections VI: Hanoi
Dec 4 – Dec 7 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS
InterAsian Connections VI: Hanoi
December 4–7, 2018
Hosted by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences
DEADLINE: February 28, 2018

 

Organizers: Social Science Research Council InterAsia Program, Duke University Global Asia Initiative, Göttingen University Global and Transregional Studies Platform, the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Hong Kong, Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore, Seoul National University Asia Center, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences, and Yale University.

We are pleased to announce an open call for papers from researchers in any world region who wish to participate in one of the eight thematic workshops at InterAsian Connections VI: Hanoi, the sixth in this international conference series.

The conference, to be held in Hanoi, Vietnam, and hosted by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences, will include concurrent workshops coordinated by individual directors and showcasing innovative research from across the social sciences and related disciplines. Workshops will focus on themes of particular relevance to Asia, reconceptualized as a dynamic and interconnected historical, geographical, and cultural formation stretching from West Asia through Eurasia and South Asia and Southeast Asia to East Asia.

The conference structure and schedule have been designed to enable intensive working group interactions on a specific research theme, as well as broader interactions on topics of mutual interest and concern. Accordingly, there will be public sessions open to the full group of conference participants and additional scholars as well as closed workshop sessions.

Paper submissions are invited from junior and senior scholars, whether graduate students, faculty, or researchers in NGOs or other research organizations, for the following eight workshops:

  • Beyond the New Media: Deep Time of Networks and Infrastructural Memory in Asia
    • Workshop Directors: Xiao LIU (East Asian Studies, McGill University) and Shuang SHEN (Comparative Literature and Asian Studies, Pennsylvania State University)
  • China’s OBOR Initiative and Its Impacts for Asian Countries
    • Workshop Directors: Anh Nguyen DANG (Director, Institute of Sociology and Vice President, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences)
  • Divine/Transcendent Rulers of Imagined Communities: The Rise and Fall of Royal Nationhood in Asia
    • Workshop Directors: Wasana WONGSURAWAT (History, Chulalongkorn University) and Michael K. CONNORS (School of Politics, History, and International Relations, University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus)
  • Eurasia’s Islamic Socialist Ecumene
    • Workshop Directors: Eren TASAR (History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Mustafa TUNA (Slavic & Eurasian Studies, Duke University)
  • Sacred Forests and Political Ecology: Cosmological Properties and Environmentality
    • Workshop Directors: Bixia CHEN (Agricultural Science, University of the Ryukyus) and Christopher COGGINS (Geography and Asian Studies, Bard College at Simon’s Rock)
  • Sport Mega-Events as Hubs for InterAsian Interactions
    • Workshop Directors: Susan BROWNELL (Anthropology, University of Missouri-St. Louis) and Gwang OK (Physical Education, Chungbuk National University)
  • States of Fortification: Connecting Asia through Technologies of Food and Health
    • Workshop Directors: Melissa L. CALDWELL (Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz) and Izumi NAKAYAMA (The University of Hong Kong)
  • The Netware of the New Asian Economy under the Industrial Revolution 4.0
    • Workshop Directors: Salvatore BABONES (Sociology, University of Sydney) and Vinh Duc NGUYEN (Institute of Sociology, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences)

Detailed abstracts for the individual workshops, information on the application process, the required application materials, answers to frequently asked questions, and details on funding can be found on our website.

Please note that an individual cannot apply to more than one workshop.

Application materials are due by February 28, 2018. Selection decisions will be announced in April 2018. Accepted participants are required to submit a draft research paper in July 2018, and a final paper in November 2018.

Questions? Contact: [email protected]