Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jan
22
Mon
Faculty Fellowship: The Summer Institute for Israel Studies
Jan 22 all-day

Faculty Fellowship: The Summer Institute for Israel Studies
June 19–July 1, 2018 at Brandeis and July 2–11, 2018 in Israel

Apply now for this competitive fellowship program, which gives you the foundation to teach about Israel in any discipline. Stipend of up to $2,500 plus travel, accommodations and most meals provided. ENGAGE with world-class faculty from Israel and the US in a two-week multidisciplinary Brandeis seminarMEET with leading personalities in public life, the academy and the arts on a 10-day Israel study tourEXPLORE the complexity of Israeli society, politics and cultureDEVELOP a syllabus to teach at your home institution. JOIN a network of over 290 alumni—teaching at over 200 institutions—supported by a wealth of pedagogical resources and ongoing professional development. Apply online by January 22, 2018. Learn more at www.brandeis.edu/israelcenter/siis.

Jan
26
Fri
Call for Applications: Encoding and Transmitting Knowledge with a String Fellowship
Jan 26 all-day

ANR project ETKnoS (2016–2020)

Call for Applications for a post-doctoral position in Social/Cultural Anthropology

ETKnoS-Encoding and Transmitting Knowledge with a String
A comparative study of the cultural uses of mathematical practices in string-figure making (Oceania, North & South America).

ETKnoS is a four-year research project funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR 16-CE27-0005-01). It is devoted to the study of “string-figure making” practices—which consist in producing a figure or design with a loop of string, by carrying out a succession of operations on this loop, using mostly fingers. Known of in numerous societies where an oral tradition prevails, this practice brings into play gestural sequences akin to algorithms, while enunciating terms and even specific stories or chants. The overall objective of ETKnoS is to understand the mathematical dimension of such practices, by considering their place in specific cultural and linguistic contexts (cf. http://www.sphere.univ-paris-diderot.fr/spip.php?rubrique170&lang=en).

Based on anthropological and ethnolinguistic analyses of data (to be) collected in several Oceanian societies (in Papua-New-Guinea and in Vanuatu), in South and North America (including the Arctic), ETKnoS examines the relationships between operational sequences and the words that are spoken or sung during these sequences. One particular goal here is to gain an improved understanding of the extent to which, in these societies, the practice of string-figure making constitutes/constituted a method for the organization and transmission of knowledge (be it mythological, cosmological, sociological geographical, etc.), involving the use of mathematical concepts.

ETKnoS’ interdisciplinary team is coordinated by ethnomathematician Eric Vandendriessche (CNRS), and currently includes two anthropologists (specialized in Inuit and Papua-New-Guinean societies), and two linguists (specialized in Inuit and Melanesian languages).

ETKnoS is soliciting applications for a full-time postdoctoral position in Anthropology which will be hosted at Paris Diderot University in the “Science, Philosophy, History” laboratory (SPHERE, UMR 7219, CNRS & Université Paris Diderot).

Planned duration of the position: 2 years, consisting in a one-year contract, renewable for a further 12 months pending a positive evaluation.

The appointment is expected to start March 1, 2018, or as soon as possible thereafter.
Net monthly salary from 2000 to 2500 euros, commensurate with experience.

To qualify for the position, candidates are required to have completed their PhD in Social/Cultural (or Linguistic) Anthropology, with a specialization in a South Amerindian society, preferably in the Amazon or in the Chaco. However, any application pertaining to oral tradition societies from South America will be carefully considered. The candidates should have significant experience in conducting ethnographic fieldwork. Experience in ethnolinguistic research and/or competence in an Indigenous language will be an asset.

The selected candidate will start out by reviewing and analyzing the existing sources (ethnographic, ethnological/ethnolinguistic and anthropological data) on string-figure making as practiced in a specific cultural area, determined by the candidate’s expertise. Subsequently the candidate will carry out ‘participant-observer’ ethnographic research over a significant period of time, in order to gather original data on string figure-making (i.e. the procedures leading to the figures, as well as any material concerning relationships with the cosmology, mythology, knowledge system and/or other practices of the designated group).

Applications should be sent no later than January 26, 2017 to Eric Vandendriessche.
They should include: an application letter, a short CV (2–3 pages, with a list of publications), a written sample of academic work (e.g., thesis and/or a recent paper), and contact information for two possible references (name, institution, email contact).

The result will be published on February 3, 2018.

For further information, please contact Eric Vandendriessche ([email protected]).

Maya Archaeology in Belize Field Program
Jan 26 all-day

The country of Belize (formerly British Honduras) is currently a top tourist destination for North Americans, and is consistently ranked as one of the top destinations for “Adventure Tourism.” The draw of the country includes its many Maya archaeological sites, seemingly pristine jungle environments, beach and caye locales, and the official English language. 

The Maya Archaeology in Belize Field Program represents an excellent opportunity for archaeology and anthropology students to develop or extend their field experience through practice in archaeological field techniques within a working archaeological site. Students will be integrated into the on-going research of the Stann Creek Regional Archaeology Project (SCRAP); a unique chance to meet and work alongside associated investigators while experiencing a Maya site before large-scale excavations and restoration have taken place. Along with instruction and practice in field procedures and techniques, this program will involve in-field lectures and field trips to Maya archaeological sites and other attractions in the region.

In addition to the two main course offerings, students will have the opportunity to enroll in an independent readings/study course (ARKY 597, ANTH 402/404. LAST 501) to conduct further research regarding a topic of interest related to Maya archaeology or Belizean culture.

For more information, please visit this website.

Jan
31
Wed
CFP: The Human Image in a Changing World @ F1963 & Kiswire Center
Jan 31 all-day

Co-organized by:

Ministry of Education, Republic of Korea (MOE)
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF)
Korean National Commission for UNESCO
Busan Metropolitan City

The theme for the 5th World Humanities Forum is “The Human Image in a Changing World.” The very purpose of humanities research is to study humans, but the image of humans however, has gone through on-going changes not only throughout different time periods but also according to the various local situations. Therefore it is important that we primarily capture human images and then document the characteristics of the human images from past to present in various academic and ordinary lives.

The theme of “The Human Image in a Changing World” seeks to examine the imbrications of human images across time and space, in order to redefine the ways in which humanities have been envisioned, particularly to visualize the various ways in which humanities engage with the cultural processes in the past, present, and future. Literature, visual arts, and new media have always taken the leading and guiding role in representing the human image as imagined and understood by the public. Historians have frequently been at the forefront of analyzing the dynamics of differences in human images in the continuum of time. Philosophers have generated profound yet varying discourses on how human images have been thought differently in terms of a philosophical relationship with nature, gender, and bodies. The emergence of the robotic industry and artificial intelligence demands investigation in order to recognize the human image, especially in the 21st century. Above all, it is crucial to discover human images as they are, and reflect them thoughtfully from various insights.

All humanities research, in its essence, explores human images that have evolved over time. It is the fundamental premise of our humanities research to understand the changing human images of today. We hope to explore and share distinctive human images, and hence develop new directions of humanities research for future generations.

Additional Roles

Participants applying are welcome to take on additional roles as moderator and commentator during the forum. Please check the boxes if you are able to moderate a session or be a commentator for other presentations.

Moderator

The moderator has the important role of overseeing the session. For a successful session, the moderator will be responsible for the following: 1) Give a short introduction of the speakers, 2) manage the time for each presentation and, 3) briefly summarize each presentation and facilitate the discussion.

Commentator

Presenters participating in the WHF are welcome to be commentators in other sessions. Around 2~3 commentators will be present at each session and give their opinion at the end of the presentation to begin the discussions.

Proposal Deadline

January 31, 2018

Funding

The World Humanities Forum will provide full support for flight and accommodation for the period of the Forum to all authors invited to present at the Forum.

Feb
1
Thu
ACOR Fellowship Opportunities
Feb 1 all-day

ACOR Fellowship Opportunities for the 2018–2019 academic year are now online and the application portal is open. ACOR promotes study, teaching, and increased knowledge of ancient and Middle Eastern studies with Jordan as a focus.

We encourage you to share these opportunities widely with your networks. Complete information about all the ACOR Fellowships is online at https://www.acorjordan.org/about-acor-fellowships/.

ACOR is offering in this cycle:

  • 2–3 residential fellowships for post-doctoral researchers for research or work leading to an academic publication
  • 2–4 residential fellowships for pre-doctoral graduate students to fund dissertation research in Jordan
  • 8 awards variously for travel, research, or accommodation for American and international students participating in ASOR affiliated archaeological projects in Jordan
  • 7 awards for Jordanian undergraduate and graduate students pursuing studies in the sphere of cultural heritage and archaeology
  • 2 awards for a Jordanian scholar or working professional to travel to the USA and present a paper at the the annual meeting of the American Schools of Oriental Research which will be held in Denver, Colorado in November, 2018 .

1 award for ACOR alumni of any nationality to present a paper in the USA at the annual Middle East Studies Association conference which will be held in San Antonio, Texas in November 15–18, 2018.

The deadline for applications is February 1, 2018 and awards will be announced by mid-April 2018.

You may also like to:

Download a flyer about the ACOR 2018–2019 Fellowships.

Read about recent ACOR Fellows and their research. 

Bishir Prize, Vernacular Architecture Forum
Feb 1 all-day

The Bishir Prize is awarded annually to the scholarly article from a juried North American publication that has made the most significant contribution to the study of vernacular architecture and cultural landscapes. Work published as a chapter in a book is eligible along with journal articles. Nominations should be based on primary research, break significant new ground in interpretation or methodology, and contribute to the intellectual vitality of vernacular studies. Entries may come from any discipline concerned with investigating vernacular architecture/landscape. Nominated pieces must bear the publication imprint of 2016 or 2017.

Deadline for submission is 1 February 2018. Send an electronic copy of the work to the prize committee: Elizabeth Collins Cromley ([email protected]), Joseph Sciorra ([email protected]), and Richard Longstreth, chair ([email protected]). Please provide the author’s contact information along with your own. Note that the committee automatically considered all refereed articles appearing in the VAF’s journal, Buildings + Landscapes.

The prize winner and nominator will be notified in early March. The award will be presented at the Vernacular Architecture Forum annual meeting in early May, 2018.

Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research
Feb 1 all-day

Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research

Scope

The Lewis and Clark Fund encourages exploratory field studies for the collection of specimens and data and to provide the imaginative stimulus that accompanies direct observation. Applications are invited from disciplines with a large dependence on field studies, such as archaeology, anthropology, biology, ecology, geography, geology, linguistics, and paleontology, but grants will not be restricted to these fields.

Eligibility

Grants will be available to doctoral students who wish to participate in field studies for their dissertations or for other purposes. Master’s candidates, undergraduates, and postdoctoral fellows are not eligible.

Award

Grants will depend on travel costs but will ordinarily be in the range of several hundred dollars to about $5,000.

Deadline

February 1 (letters of support due January 30); notification in May.

The application may be accessed at www.amphilsoc.org/grants/lewisandclark. Questions should be directed to Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, at [email protected] or 215-440-3429.

Colorado State University PhD Program
Feb 1 all-day

The Department of Anthropology at Colorado State University is delighted to announce the Fall 2018 launch of a new PhD program in anthropology focused on Place, Space, and Adaptation. This innovative PhD in anthropology builds on the diverse research interests of our faculty who specialize in cultural anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology as well as human and physical geography. The program will provide students with the conceptual expertise and skills to address research questions that:

  • sit at the intersection of anthropology and geography
  • apply geographic methods to anthropological questions
  • critically evaluate the impact of place and space on human/ecosystem adaptation

PhD Field Areas: Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology
PhD Specializations: The traditional subfields of Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, and Cultural Anthropology, in addition to Geography
PhD Requirements: MA in Anthropology, Geography, or related field. 42 hours of coursework, qualifying exam, dissertation based on field or lab work, and oral defense

Visit the program website for more information.

Feb
9
Fri
The CALA (2019) Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology
Feb 9 all-day

Full Title: Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 1

Short Title: CALA 1 (2019)

Location:
Siem Reap, Cambodia

Start Date:
23-Jan-2019 – 26-Jan-2019

Contact: Professor Susan Hagadorn

Meeting Email: [email protected]

Meeting URL: http://cala2019.puc.edu.kh

Meeting Description: 

The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, The CALA 1 (2019), in Cambodia, symbolizes a significant movement forward for Linguistic Anthropology, and in problematizing current perspectives and praxis in the field of Asian Linguistic Anthropology.

The CALA seeks to respond to concerns by those within respective fields, Linguistics, Anthropology, Sociolinguistics, Sociology, Cultural studies, and of course Linguistic Anthropology These concerns include the reduced (opportunity for) focus on Asian regions and work by Asian academics, largely contributable to issues of funding and expertise. These concerns also include that academics globally seek to both work on Asian regions and with Asian regions, but impeded by the absence of appropriate networks.

The CALA 1 thus aims to begin an era within which to opportune these academics to transfer knowledge, expertise, and valuable Linguistic and Anthropological Data across the world, through the interpersonal and inter-institutional networks the CALA conferences seek to build.

To ground these efforts, the Conference, at The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia at the centre, seeks to network a growing number of Institutions globally, to support this much needed project.

The theme for the inaugural CALA is ‘Revitalization and Representation‘, a theme pertinent to the current state of many Asian regions and countries vis-a-vis their global analogues.

Emerging from a complex weaving for received and produced colonializations, the languages and ethnicities within Asia have experienced strong curtailment and denigration, to the point where many have reached near extinction, while others have passed the point of extinction. Here, these languages and ethnicities require urgent revitalization through an anthropological set of approaches, in collaboration with academic, and non-academic, networks globally. Revitalization can be engendered effectively through the complex channels associated with and effected through the extensive and vast work developed in Representation. Cambodia seems to be at the centre of this need for focus, with many ethnicities and their languages currently on the brink of extinction, and with several now having less than ten living speakers.

Though The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia will host the Inaugural conference in 2019, in Siem Reap, the conference will be hosted by a different Institution globally, annually, while Paññāsāstra remains at the helm of the Conference, so to collaborate with all institutions wishing to involve themselves with and in the CALA network.

We thus welcome you to the CALA 1, in 2019, the Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, and to the CALA in general.

Important dates:

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Opens: Friday, October 13, 2017 at midnight (UTC Time)
Closes: Monday, February 9, 2018 at midnight (UTC Time)
________________________________

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE

By March 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
________________________________

REGISTRATION

Early Bird
Opens: February 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: May 14, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Normal Bird
Opens: May 15, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: August 25, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Late Bird
Opens: August 26, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: January 26, 2019, (Conference end)
________________________________

CONFERENCE DATES

Wednesday January 23rd, 2019
Thursday January 24th, 2019
Friday January 25th, 2019
Saturday January 26th, 2019
Subfields:

  • Anthropological linguistics
  • Applied sociolinguistics
  • Cognitive Anthropology and language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Post-structuralism and language
  • Semiotics and semiology
  • Language documentation
  • General sociolinguistics
  • Language socialization
  • Social psychology of language
  • Language revitalization
  • Ethnography of communication
  • Language, community, ethnicity
  • Language, dialect, sociolect, genre
  • Nonverbal semiotics
  • Multifunctionality
  • Language and embodiment
  • Documenting language
  • Ethnographical language work
  • Language, gender, sexuality
  • Language ideologies
  • Narrative and metanarrative
  • Language and spatial and temporal frames
  • Language minorities and majorities
  • Language in real and virtual spaces

Language contact and change

Ethnographic Field School in Belize
Feb 9 all-day

The Center for Applied Anthropology (CfAA, http://nku.edu/cfaa/) at Northern Kentucky University (NKU, http://nku.edu) organizes an annual ethnographic field school in Belize directed by Douglas Hume (Department Chair and Associate Professor of Anthropology) every June in collaboration with the NKU International Education Center – Office of Education Abroad and Cooperative Center for Study Abroad (CCSA, http://ccsa.cc/). The following information is for the June 2018 Ethnographic Field School in Belize:

• Location: Orange Walk District, Belize
• Dates: Departing June 19 and returning July 18, 2018 (30 days/ 29 nights)
• Base Program Price: $3,699-3,899 (includes ground transportation, accommodations, breakfast, dinner, and excursions; price varies due to early application deadline and option transcript request, see below for more information)
• Group Travel Price: $649-899 (estimated price roundtrip air transportation from one of CCSA’s designated U.S. departure cities)
• Tuition: Waived! To transfer credit to another institution, there is $100.00 transcript fee (check with your institutional transfer fees, if any).
• Early Application Deadline: February 9, 2018 ($100 reduction in the program price by means of a reducing the application fee to $150)
• Final Application Deadline: February 23, 2018 (application fee of $250)
• Credit: 4 hours (undergraduate or graduate)
• Sample Syllabus, Schedule and Packing List: http://inside.nku.edu/artsci/centers/cfaa/ethnographic-field-school.html
• CCSA Course Site: https://ccsa.cc/programs/summer/2018/Belize-Anthropology
• CCSA Online Application: https://ccsa.studioabroad.com/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=39098

For more information (i.e., Course Description, Community-based Research Project, Program Excursions, Advisor Information, Field School Benefits, Funding Opportunities, Photo Album, Movie Album, and Student Recommendations), please visit the field school’s web site: http://nku.edu/cfaa/