Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Feb
14
Thu
Household Water Insecurity Experiences – Research Coordination Network Reception
Feb 14 – Feb 17 all-day

NSF Funds Research Coordination Network for Household Water Insecurity

The National Science Foundation (Geography and Spatial Science Program) has funded the Household Water Insecurity Experiences (HWISE) – Research Coordination Network (RCN) to operate at the strategic intersection of social science discovery, policy, and practice. The project is under the direction of Principal Investigator Dr. Wendy Jepson (Department of Geography, Texas A&M University) and Co-PIs Dr. Justin Stoler (Department of Geography and Regional Studies, University of Miami), Dr. Amber Wutich (Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University), and Dr. Sera Young (Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University).

RCN Goals and Activities

The HWISE-RCN’s mission is to build a community of practice and collaboration that fosters key analytics and theoretical advances coupled with the development of research protocols and standardized assessments to document, benchmark, and understand the causes and outcomes of water insecurity at the household scale. Our objectives are to promote cutting edge research about the experiences and assessment of household water insecurity, and to create a network that supports scientific discovery and professional development. Our goals are to (1) integrate geospatial methodologies into existing HWISE research (2) evaluate how HWISE methods and concepts can be translated to household water insecurity experiences in high- and middle-income regions, and (3) establish and cultivate key pathways to translate HWISE discoveries to NSF research priority efforts.

HWISE Collaborations now include over 40 scholars from 24 U.S. and international institutions across the career spectrum and disciplines including social sciences, public health, water-sector professionals, policy makers, and development practitioners. Please visit our website to learn more about the project or how you can join as a member.

Upcoming Activities

The network will launch and host a reception at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual meeting in Washington, DC from February 14-17, 2019. This event will be an opportunity to learn more about the network activities and will highlight our HWISE Scale and Development project

Feb
15
Fri
25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

Feb
20
Wed
Call for Papers: Rurality and Future-Making
Feb 20 all-day

Rurality and Future-Making: Comparative Perspectives from Europe, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean 
May 24–25, 2019
NSG, University of Cologne (organized jointly by the following Regional Working Groups of the German Anthropological Association (GAA) – RG Europe, RG Middle East and RG Mediterranean)

 

 

Submission Deadline: February 20, 2019

The conference language will be English.

If you are interested to present a paper, please send an Abstract (200-300 words) to [email protected] by December 31, 2018.

We are planning to publish the proceedings of the conference in an edited volume.

 

Conveners:

  • GAA Regional Working Group Europe:
  • Jelena Tošić (St. Gallen/Vienna), Andreas Streinzer (Frankfurt/Vienna) GAA Regional Working Group Middle East:
  • Katharina Lange (Berlin)
  • GAA Regional Working Group Mediterranean:
  • Michaela Schäuble (Bern), Martin Zillinger (Cologne)
  • Organizers: Simon Holdermann (Cologne), Christoph Lange (Cologne)

Contact: [email protected]

 

This conference brings together three GAA regional working groups – Anthropology of Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean – to explore rurality as a reserve and resource for future-making in their interconnected and transnational regionalities. It invites participants to explore situated practices of future-making in order to trace how rurality is achieved, marked and (de-)stabilized in different places. Through concrete ethnographic case studies, we aim at conceptualizing the ‘rural’ beyond wellknown center-periphery dichotomies. Well aware that ‘the rural’ and ‘the urban’ can only be “understood as a continuum irreducible to the polarity of one or the other term” (Chio 2017:362); we use the rural lens to create an anthropological laboratory (Albera 1999) which enables us to “write against established categories” (Horden 2014:9). This conference invites researchers to reflect on the various perpetuated methodological urbanisms, ruralisms and regionalisms, i.e. the persisting preoccupation of ethnographers with urban spaces and research in geographically and/ or politically bounded categories like Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Most of these categories contribute to the construction of our methodological iron cage as Wimmer and Glick-Schiller pointed out in the term methodological nationalism (2002:302). With the focus on rurality as an anthropological laboratory and lens, we aim to challenge earlier essentialist approaches and at the same time emphasize its contradictory and thus productive potential.

While overall, the rural population may be on the decline, it may well increase in absolute numbers in specific places. And while rural population may predominantly rely on agriculture for a living, in various regions its share of GDP is diminishing. Poverty remains particularly pronounced in rural regions. In North Africa, this becomes evident in the inadequate access to education, health services, electricity or clean water (Barnes 2014). Moreover, the demographic exodus out of vast rural areas in parts of Southern Europe challenges not only individual but also communal lives as well as national political agendas. Nevertheless, grand visions of future-making by politicians and entrepreneurs remain geared towards rural regions – whether it be in terms of large-scale agricultural projects for the continuous fragile and fragmented landscapes of the Mediterranean, irrigation and electrification schemes for the exploitation of its natural resources, or in the form of touristic development agencies for purported isolated areas. Also, in various countries along the Mediterranean shorelines, governments continue to rely on networks and patronage systems in the rural hinterlands as its basis of power.

But rurality is not only played out as a resource for large scale politics of modernization, it can also be used as a socio-ecological reserve that people maintain to diversify their opportunities and resources in times of crises. Large-scale modernization schemes and their risks are thus mitigated by individual strategies to provide for alternative options and material foundations in case of failure. One de-centered perspective on rurality is Hauschild’s emphasis on the rural hinterland as material and political reserve which encompasses various available resources to ensure, expand and delimit agency (Hauschild 2008:217f.).

For a long time, Eastern and Southern Europe, the Mediterranean as well as the Middle East have been approached by their presupposed outstanding rural character in anthropological inquiry; like the notorious ‘honor-and-shame’ complex, ‘the rural’ can be seen as a “gatekeeping concept” for anthropologists who had been working in these areas (Appadurai 1986:357). This is apparently present in classical anthropological studies on ‘Mediterranean countrymen’ (Pitt-Rivers 1963, Davis 1977) as well as in the rich corpus of peasant studies from Southern Europe to the Middle East – a body of research and literature that has provided essential impulses in the formation of anthropological theory.

Arguably, anthropological research in recent decades has shifted away from the countryside to the metropoles, predominately exploring the rural through the lens of the urban, bureaucratic elites, cultural entrepreneurs and tourists’ promises (Deeb/Winnegar 2012:539). Against this background we want to promote a symmetrical anthropology of the rural, which opens up new perspectives for research.

Finally, we invite scholars to expand and multiply Horden and Purcell’s (2000) perspective on the Mediterranean to Europe as a whole and the Middle East. Their emphasis on the ruptures and connectivities of “human micro-ecologies” (Horden 2012: 28) pervading the karst landscapes of the Mediterranean and encompassing Southern Europe, parts of the Middle East and North Africa, can help us comparatively zoom in on webs of microregions in which rurality takes on different forms and meaning and is played out differently at different locales.

Research topics and questions for the conference may entail:

  • How and for whom does the rural/hinterland/landscape figure to be a meaningful space of social relations and livelihoods?
  • The ‘rural’ as backdrop for processes of globalization or the recursive rural impact on globalization
  • What are spatial and power implications of the Mediterranean as an imaginary category?
  • What are the perceptions of “rural Europe” and what kind of histories and future-making imaginaries do they imply?
  • The ‘mediatized Mediterranean’: rurality, infrastructures and media
  • How can we conceptualize local/global, rural/urban and periphery/center binaries in a more productive way?
  • The ‘rural’ in development practice and discourse and in changing modernization narratives
  • Migration and other rural (im-)mobilities?
  • Rurality, Scale and Migration
  • Rethinking the ‘rural’ with reference to Horden/Purcell’s historical ecology and its defining features of rupture and connectivity
  • The ‘rural’ as cultural identity and heritage – the entrepreneurial potential and imaginary for ‘the touristic gaze’
Summer 2019 OSEA Ethnography Field School in México
Feb 20 all-day

Summer 2019 OSEA Ethnography Field School in México

 

Six Week Program:  June 2 to July 13: http://www.osea-cite.org/program/ethnography_overview.php

Four Week 1:  June 2 to June 29

Four Week  2: June 16 to July 13

<http://www.osea-cite.org/program/ethnography_overview.php/#fourweekprogramdates>

——————————

 

OSEA Maya Language Immersion, FLAS Eligible

 

OSEA Intensive Spanish

 

Where:   Chichén Itzá, Yucatán México

 

Enrollment & Applications: http://www.osea-cite.org/apply/application.php

  • Enrollment Opens Dec. 10 2018
  • Early Enrollment by Jan 20, 2019, $300 discount
  • Regular Enrollment by February 20, 2019

 

Students learn to do ethnography, while conducting individual or team projects on:

  • Archaeological ethnography — life histories of Maya who lived in Chichén Itzá
  • Tourism Ethnography — Studying tourist experience
  • Gender Studies — Maya sexualities, dating & concepts of self & person
  • Globalization — Maya subcultures, youth
  • Visual ethnography — photographic ethnography of Maya art, everyday life
  • Heritage Studies — Maya concepts of ruins, politics of the past as commodity
  • Anthropology of Food — identity through diet/food in globalized cultures
  • Medical Anthropology — illness narratives, healing, suffering, Self
  • Economic Anthropology — gendered strategies & visions of life success

 

Visit www.osea-cite.org for program details

 

Summer Institute in Computational Social Science
Feb 20 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation – 2019 Summer Institutes

Summer Institute in Computational Social Science

Dates:  June 16 – 29, 2019                                   

Application Deadline:  February 20, 2019

The Russell Sage Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation will sponsor the third Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, to be held at Princeton University from June 16 – 29, 2019. The purpose of the two-week institute is to introduce graduate students and beginning faculty in the social and data sciences (broadly conceived) to computational social science—the use of digital-age data sources and methods to conduct social research. The program will highlight issues about access, privacy, and confidentiality that are raised by the emergence of computational data and methods. In addition to the event at Princeton, there will also be partner locations run by alumni of the 2017 and 2018 Summer Institute, which will be hosted at other universities. Participation is restricted to Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers, and untenured faculty within 7 years of the Ph.D. Most participant costs, including housing, meals, and travel will be covered. We welcome applicants from all backgrounds and fields of study, especially applicants from groups currently under-represented in computational social science. Detailed information about the summer institute and applying can be found here:  https://www.russellsage.org/summer-institutes.

Questions should be directed to Chris Bail at [email protected].

Feb
21
Thu
Mother Tongue Film Festival
Feb 21 – Feb 24 all-day

Mother Tongue Film Festival

When: February 21 to 24, 2019
Where: Various venues in Washington, D.C.
Why: Through digital storytelling, we amplify the work of diverse practitioners who explore the power of language to connect the past, present, and future.

As one of the partners in the Smithsonian’s Recovering Voices initiative, we invite you to join us for the fourth annual Mother Tongue Film Festival, celebrating cultural and linguistic diversity by showcasing films and filmmakers from around the world over four days of free screenings. This year, we present six feature films, fifteen shorts, and one immersive audiovisual installation, together representing sixty-two languages. The films are spread across nine different events in D.C.—all free and open to the public. From drama to documentary, animated shorts to a rooftop music video, there is something for everyone. Many of the screenings will be followed by discussions with our guest filmmakers and actors. View the full schedule.

Mar
1
Fri
2019 International Field School on Site Formation, Stratigraphy, and Geoarchaeology in the Athenian Agora
Mar 1 all-day

International Field School on Site Formation, Stratigraphy, and Geoarchaeology in the Athenian Agora

 

Deadline: March 1, 2019

 

The Malcolm H. Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Science (ASCSA) in collaboration with the ASCSA Excavations at the Athenian Agora offers a full week-long Field School on Site Formation, Stratigraphy, and Geoarchaeology in the Athenian Agora. Dr. Panagiotis (Takis) Karkanas, director of the Wiener Laboratory and Paul Goldberg, Professorial Research Fellow University of Wollongong, will supervise the intensive field school. Registered students will be involved in interdisciplinary field research in the Athenian Agora primarily focused on archaeological context, geoarchaeology, and material sciences. Through field observations, laboratory analysis, and lectures, the students will receive instruction in the study and analysis of archaeological sediments and deposits, as well as gain experience in the recording of stratigraphy, and the understanding site formation processes. A maximum of 12 students will be accepted for the course. Preference is given to advanced students and post-docs with a background in archaeology, and preferably some exposure to the natural sciences as well.

The cost for Room and Board is 300 euros for the entire week. Travel costs to Greece and to the site are not included.

The course will take place from June 2 to 8, 2019. Applications should be submitted no later than 1st March via the online application form: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/127620/international-field-school-on-site-formation-stratigraphy-and-geoarchaeology-in

Application materials include one paragraph explaining why the candidate is interested in participating in the course, a CV, a list of grades (unofficial transcript), and names and email addresses of two referees.

Participants who successfully complete the course of instruction will receive a certificate detailing the content of the field school.

Textbooks: Reconstructing Archaeological sites 2019 by Panagiotis Karkanas and Paul Goldberg (Wiley Blackwell), Practical and Theoretical Geoarchaeology 2006 by Paul Goldberg and Richard I. Macphail (Blackwell) and Microarchaeology 2010 by Stephen Weiner (Cambridge University Press).

A syllabus will be emailed 3 weeks before the start of the field school.

For further information or questions, please contact Dr. Panagiotis (Takis) Karkanas at  [email protected].

2019 Phillips Fund Grants for Native American Research
Mar 1 all-day

Scope

For research in Native American linguistics and ethnohistory, focusing on the continental United States and Canada. Given for a maximum of one year from date of award to cover travel, tapes, and consultants’ fees.

Eligibility

Applicants may be graduate students pursuing either a master’s or a doctoral degree; postdoctoral applicants are also eligible.

Award

From $1,000 to $3,500.

Deadline

March 1; notification in May.

Application

The application may be accessed at https://www.amphilsoc.org/grants/phillips-fund-native-american-research. Questions should be directed to Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, at [email protected] or 215-440-3429.

2019 UVic Archaeology Field School in Barkley Sound
Mar 1 all-day

Applications accepted now

Dates: July 1st – August 9th, 2019
Credits: two 1.5-credit courses (ANTH 343 & 344)
Application deadline: March 1st, 2019

6 weeks – 2 courses – 3 UVic credits

UVic Archaeology field school in Barkley Sound is a six-week field school hosted by the UVic Department of Anthropology and the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre on southwestern Vancouver Island. The field school takes place in the lands and territories of two neighbouring Nuu-chah-nulth Nations, Tseshaht and Huu-ay-aht.

The first four days of the field school will be based in Victoria followed by two and a half weeks of remote camp-based fieldwork in Tseshaht First Nation territories in the Broken Group Islands in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. The final 3-weeks of the course will be spent in Huu-ay-aht First Nation territory at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre (a UVic supported teaching and research facility in Barkley Sound) where students will conduct laboratory analyses and prepare written research reports on recovered archaeological material. This course will be an immersive 6-week field experience (including hiking, camping, and boat travel) and require full days and dedicated teamwork.

For more information, please visit the field school blog here.

Information on how to apply here: https://onlineacademiccommunity.uvic.ca/coastalfieldarch/apply-to-the-field-school/

Call for Papers: Place Branding and Consumption of Heritage
Mar 1 all-day

Special Issue “Place Branding and the Consumption of Heritage”

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section “Sustainability of Culture and Heritage“.

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2019

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050) calls for original research on the synergisms between the geographic attributes of place (regions, countries, cities, towns and landscapes) and how consumption —through tourism or via consumer goods and services—creates a special niche in regional and global economies. While globalization aims to homogenize consumer tastes and preferences, public and private stakeholders increasingly draw on folklore, culture, history, and the tangential attributes of landscape to add value to consumer and tourist experiences. Together, these synergisms portend a sustainable approach to improving the human condition in an increasingly borderless and limitless realm of consumption and tourist experiences. This process, however, is fraught with tension as different narratives about authenticity and heritage emerge. Accordingly, we seek contributions from across the social sciences and business fields that use both case-study and empirically-anchored perspectives, as well as approaches at broader, theoretical and meta-analytical levels, to explore these aspects of place-branding.

Topics might range from the rise of agricultural tourism (wine-circuits and viticulture, specialty produce), micro-breweries, social justice museums (the American south, Eastern Europe), and the burgeoning literature on “Made in [fill in the country],” to ways in which local, regional, and national products enlist color, music, story-telling, cultural icons, and myth-making to couple consumption or tourism-marketing strategies with place attributes.

The Guest Editor guarantees a timely yet thorough review and turnaround of all submissions. Sustainability, whose Impact Factor this fifth year of open-access publication is 2.075, is an international, scholarly journal whose peer-reviewed papers highlight the  environmental, cultural, economic, and social sustainability of human beings. It is indexed by SCIE, SSCI, and other databases.

If you have interest in this special topic issue, please provide a 150-word abstract first before formal submission. Looking forward to your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Joseph L. Scarpaci
Guest Editor

References

  • Arnould, E. J., & Thompson, C. J. (2005). Consumer culture theory (CCT): Twenty years of research. Journal of consumer research31(4), 868-882.
  • Ashworth, G., & Larkham, P. (2013). Building a new heritage (RLE Tourism). Routledge.
  • Dinnie, K. (2015). Nation branding: Concepts, issues, practice. Routledge.
  • Fehimović, D. & Ogden, R. (Eds.) (2017) Branding Latin America: Strategies, aims, resistance. Lexington Books.
  • Graham, B. J., & Howard, P. (Eds.). (2008). The Ashgate research companion to heritage and identity. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • Graham, B., Ashworth, G., & Tunbridge, J. (2016). A geography of heritage: Power, culture and economy. Routledge.
  • Holt, D.B. (2004). How brands become icons: Principles of cultural branding. Harvard Business School.
  • Manning, P. & Ulisashvili, A. 2008. “Our Beer”: Ethnographic brands in postsocialist Georgia. American Anthropologist 109 (4): 626-641.
  • Morales, E. & Scapraci, J.L. (2012). Marketing without advertising: Brand preference and consumer choice in Cuba. Routledge
  • Park, H.Y. (2014). Heritage tourism. Routledge.
  • Pettygrove, M., & Ghose, R. (2018). From “rust belt” to “fresh coast”: Remaking the city through food justice and urban agriculture. Annals of the American Association of Geographers108(2), 591-603.
  • Pike, A. (2009). Geographies of brands and branding.  Progress in Human Geography, 33(5):  619-645.
  • Rivera, L. A. (2008). Managing “Spoiled” national identity: War, tourism, and memory in Croatia. American Sociological Review 73(4): 613-634.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2005), Plazas and barrios: Heritage tourism and globalization in the Latin American centro histórico. University of Arizona Press.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2007). Globalization tourists and heritage tourists in American culture: The case of Latin American historic districts. Material Culture 39 (2): 1-16.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2016). The meaning of objects. Material Culture 48:1-9.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Coupey, E. & Reed, S. 2018. Artists as cultural icons:  The icon myth transfer effect as a heuristic for cultural branding. Journal of Product & Brand Management. 27(3): 320-333.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Portela, A.H. (2009). Cuban landscapes: History, memory and place. Guilford.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Sovacool, B.J., and Ballantyne, R. (2016). A critical review of the costs of advertising: A transformative consumer research perspective. Journal of Consumer Policy 39 (2): 1-22.
  • Schor, J.B. & Holt, D.B. (2000) The consumer society reader. The New Press.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • place branding
  • heritage
  • consumer goods
  • tourism
  • cultural geography/cultural anthropology

Published Papers
This special issue is now open for submission.