Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to ancalendar@americananthro.org.

 

Mar
22
Wed
Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Application Deadline
Mar 22 @ 12:00 am – Jun 6 @ 8:00 pm

In 2017, the seventh annual Mellon/ACLS Fellows program will place up to 22 recent humanities PhDs in two-year positions at the nonprofits and government agencies listed below. Public Fellows will participate in the core work of these partner organizations while benefiting from professional mentoring and other career building opportunities. The fellowship carries a stipend of $67,500 per year, as well as individual health insurance and $3,000 toward professional development activities.

This year’s Public Fellows will take up positions in the fields of program evaluation, digital strategy, political advocacy, public policy, and communications (among many others) and will work on issues such as immigration, affordable housing, civil rights, environmental conservation, Internet and press freedom, and diversity in higher education. The placements are located in New York, Newark, NJ, Boston, Washington, New Orleans, Chicago, Minneapolis and St. Paul, Denver, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle.

The 2017 hosting organizations and positions are:

  1. Association of American Colleges & Universities – Associate Director for Diversity, Equity, and Student Success
  2. Association of College & Research Libraries – Program Manager
  3. Boston Housing Authority – Program Analyst
  4. Brooklyn Academy of Music – Program Analyst, Education and Community Engagement
  5. Community Partners – Program Evaluator
  6. The Feminist Press – Development Manager
  7. The Field Museum – Public Engagement Manager, Diversity and Inclusion
  8. Free Press – Campaign Organizer
  9. Humanities Action Lab – Program Manager
  10. International Student Exchange Programs – Student Success Officer
  11. Minneapolis Institute of Art – Content Analyst
  12. The Moth – Marketing Manager
  13. National Conference of State Legislatures – Legislative Policy Specialist
  14. National Women’s Law Center – Policy Analyst
  15. Natural Resources Defense Council – International Campaign Advocate
  16. New America – Editor
  17. NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs – Policy Analyst
  18. The Public Theater – Strategic Communications Manager
  19. Seattle Office of Arts & Culture – Impact and Assessment Manager
  20. Twin Cities PBS – Strategic Impact Analyst
  21. Vera Institute of Justice – Senior Program Associate
  22. Yerba Buena Center for the Arts – Community Organizing Manager

Applicants to the Public Fellows program must possess US citizenship or permanent resident status and have a PhD in the humanities or humanistic social sciences conferred between September 1, 2013 and June 18, 2017. Applicants must have defended and deposited their dissertations no later than April 6, 2017.

Further information about the application process and this year’s positions is available at www.acls.org/programs/publicfellowscomp/.  All applications must be submitted through ACLS’s online application system (ofa.acls.org) by 8 pm EDT on March 22, 2017.

I have attached a program flyer, which I hope you will share with your communities. If I can provide you with any additional information or materials, please let me know. Questions about the program may be addressed to me or to publicfellows@acls.org.

Mar
27
Mon
Picturing Milwaukee : Sherman Park @ University of Milwaukee-Wisconsin
Mar 27 all-day

Summer 2017 Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School

Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures, School of Architecture and Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Class Dates: June 26 – August 5, 2017; Final exhibit: August 18, 2017

Preparatory Workshop (attendance required), June 23. 2014, 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM. School of Architecture and Urban Planning, UWM

This summer course provides students with an immersion experience in the field recording of the built environment and cultural landscapes and an opportunity to learn how to write history literally “from the ground up.”  The 2017 field school focuses on Sherman Park, a racially, economically and culturally diverse neighborhood known for its artist communities and active neighborhood groups. This summer we will study residential building types in this neighborhood—everyday residences, duplex and four squares, single- and multi-family units, boarded up homes, refabricated and reused homes, homes transformed into stores and workplaces, homes as works of art, homes remembered in family histories and homes in domestic worlds.

This project seeks to employ the enduring creativity of storytelling, the power of digital humanities, and depth of local knowledge to galvanize Milwaukee residents to talk about their homes as repositories of community memory, spaces of caring and markers of civic pride. Students will learn how to “read” buildings within their urban material, social, ecological and cultural contexts, create reports on historic buildings and cultural landscapes and produce multimedia documentaries.

The five-week course calendar covers a broad array of academic skills. Workshops during Week 1 will focus on photography, measured drawings, documentation and technical drawings; no prior experience is necessary. Week 2 will include archival and historical research focusing on the study of the built environment. Week 3 schedule includes workshops on oral history interviewing and digital ethnography. Week 4 is centered on mapping and archival research. Week 5 and 6 will be devoted to producing final reports and multi-media documentaries.

You may participate in this field school free as a community intern. However if you want university credits you will need to sign up for summer school classes at http://www4.uwm.edu/schedule/

We will be accepting a maximum of 15 students.  You may take a maximum of 6 credits.  Choose from the list below.

ARCH 190 Special Topics: Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures Field School.  –3 cr.

ARCH 534 Field Study. –3 cr.

ARCH 550: Building Types & Settings (Seminar)

ARCH 551: American Vernacular Arch

ARCH 553: Vernacular Buildings/Groupings

ARCH 561 Measured Drawing for Architects. –3 cr.

ARCH 562 Preservation Technology Laboratory. –3 cr.

ARCH 391/791 Independent Studies for Undergraduate/Graduate Students (Directed Research). –3 cr.

Nationally recognized faculty directing portions of this school include Jeffrey E. Klee, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Anna Andrzejewski, Associate Professor of Art History, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Michael H. Frisch, Professor and Senior Research Scholar, University at Buffalo, Guha Shankar, Folklife Specialist at the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., and Arijit Sen, Associate Professor of Architecture, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee.

Documentary equipment, and supplies, will be provided, but students must be able to fund their own travel, meals and modest lodging accommodations (if they are from out of town). For more information please contact Prof. Arijit Sen at senA@uwm.edu.
www.Thefieldschool.weebly.com

Mar
31
Fri
CfP: Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science
Mar 31 all-day

Achille Mbembe (2003) used the term ‘necropolitics’ to account for the existence of ‘death worlds’ within postcolonial geopolitical spaces.

While work in biopolitics has privileged the dynamics of ‘making live and letting die,’ Mbembe highlights the importance of both, extending lives and making deaths.

Rosi Braidotti (2013) follows Mbembe and includes posthuman subjects within the politics of death. Contemporary Anthropocene — as a limit of total extinction provoking an intense scholarship around the boundaries of life and worthy lives — is not exempt from problems associated with Western notions of individualism and humanism (Haraway 2016). In certain ways, Braidotti’s approach, along with other vitalist materialisms such as the work of Bennett (2010) or Barad (2007), allow for the generativity of Life to be seen as a material ongoing force that usurps such Western tendencies. While they transcend the idea of death as an exceptionally human experience that conditions political existence, at the same time they tend to reduce processes of death into Life, or ongoing generativity.

How can STS/ the anthropology of science and technology, research and mobilize the production of boundaries between life and death, between Life as organic and that which is Non-Life (Povinelli 2016)? How can we account for processes of differential dying in more-than-Western, more-than-human, more-than-bios, or even, more-than-earth worlds? This panel looks for contributions around the material semiotics of death, dead subjects, and killing/elimination that engage with the processes by which they are maintained, resignified, or disrupted.  Welcoming fabulation, empirical, theoretical, or speculative communications.

More information on the panel can be found here http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/open_panel_topics_34_66

The deadline for submission is March 1st. You may apply at https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ssss/4s17/

 

Museums in Arabia 2017: Hosted by the Bahrain National Museum
Mar 31 all-day

Museums in Arabia is an internationally established conference series. Museums in Arabia operates as an international collaborative network for exploring the theory and practice of museums and heritage in the Arabian Peninsula. Established in 2011 the conference series has developed successful events at different host institutions, including the British Museum in 2012 as a special session at the Arabian Seminar and at the Museum of Islamic Art, Doha, in partnership with UCL Qatar in 2014. The conference provides a platform for local, regional and international scholars and practitioners to come together to discuss and exchange ideas around museum and heritage practices in the Gulf.

The 2017 iteration of the Museums in Arabia series aims to engage more specifically with how artistic and aesthetic practice and production (in the broadest sense) is employed within museums, galleries, heritage events, and urban planning in the Arabian Peninsula. Hosted by the Bahrain National Museum, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain and generously supported by the Bahrain Authority for Culture & Antiquities, October 11-13, 2017. Conference sessions will take place over two days on the 11th and 12th of October. On October 13th 2017 all participants will be invited to engage in a day of site visits and discussions led by the Bahrain Authority for Culture & Antiquities.

We encourage paper proposals that examine the specific ways in which ‘artistic’ practice and production is presented and consumed within the context of Gulf museums, galleries, exhibitions and events.

Representation and Identity

How is artistic expression defined in the Gulf? What ‘forms’ of artistic expression are produced (in the past and the present) and by whom? How are different identities represented and reproduced through artistic practice in the cultural sector in the region and how do these relate to the museums and heritage landscape in general? Who has the power to represent and re-produce identity through artistic expression? 

Artistic Practice

What artistic practices are employed within museums in the region? How do these practices relate to the production of museum aesthetics both ‘inside’ and ‘outside’ the museum? How is artistic practice used in the production of new museums, architecture, and in the heritage field and who is involved in creating those expressions? Where is art produced and by whom? How is artistic practice used to represent local, regional and international identity? What aspects of museums can be considered ‘artistic’?

Space and Place

How are artistic practices employed in the production of space and place? How is cultural production implicated in the development of new buildings, districts and cities? How are heritage buildings re-created and re-used as spaces of artistic and creative enterprise in contemporary Gulf societies? How is the past, present and future represented in spaces and places in the Gulf?

Themes may address but are not limited to the following areas:

  • Art Practice and Theory in Gulf Museology
  • Artistic Identity
  • Architects, Architectural Styles and Architectural Practice
  • New Technologies
  • Artists and Designers
  • Designers, Design Museums and Design Districts
  • Creation of Zones and Districts
  • Adaption and Re-Adaption of Heritage Spaces and Places

Abstracts addressing other themes relevant to this conference will also be considered.

The Museums in Arabia series encourages cross-disciplinary exchange and engagement. The conference attracts participants from a broad array of disciplines with the aim of encouraging interdisciplinary modes of inquiry. We therefore encourage academics and practitioners from any relevant discipline to submit proposals.

By exploring the relationship(s) between artistic production and practice (in the broadest sense) in museums, galleries and heritage institutions we seek to broaden the conversation around the significance of this area and to identify future avenues for related research. Additionally, as the Museums in Arabia series attracts scholars from a wide variety of geographic locations and research specializations it provides a unique opportunity to foster multidisciplinary dialogue around the theory and practice of museum, gallery and heritage activities in the region.

Theoretical analysis and understandings of artistic and aesthetic production and practice is under-represented in the literature relating to museums and heritage in the Gulf. We therefore expect to draw contributions that can lead to new publications in the field. Selected papers of this conference will be published in an edited volume. Already the 2014 Museums in Arabia conference led to the publication of the edited volume Museums in Arabia: Transnational Practices and Regional Processes (K. Exell & S. Wakefield, 2016, Routledge).

This conference will be of interest to academics, practitioners and students interested in museum and heritage theory and practice in the Gulf, Creative and artistic practices, and, more broadly, those with an interest in the cultural, economic and political landscape of the region.

Abstracts should follow the Museums in Arabia submission guidelines. Abstracts must include author’s institutional affiliation, paper title, abstract (500 words maximum); author’s biography, author’s contact details and keywords.

Deadline for abstract submissions: 31st March 2017

Please submit abstracts to: conference@museumsinarabia.com

For any queries regarding abstract submissions please email Sarina Wakefield at Sarina.Wakefield@zu.ac.ae and Laila Prager at lp75@nyu.edu

Listening participants must pre-register for the conference. If you would like to attend the conference as a listening participant, please send an email to conference@museumsinarabia with ‘Listening Participant’ in the subject line. Attendance will only be confirmed once you have received confirmation of your place at the conference. Arabic-English and English Arabic Translation will be available for all conference sessions.

Decisions will be communicated by 30th April 2017.

Website: http://www.museumsinarabia.com

Twitter: @museumsinarabia

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/museumsinarabia/

 

 

Second International Congress on the Anthropology of Salt Call for Proposals @ Pabellón Cultural de la República
Mar 31 all-day

SECOND INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS ON THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF SALT

12–16 October 2017, Los Cabos, México

Registration and paper submissions now open

We welcome sessions on any and beyond the following themes: Salt and Gastronomy, Salt and Medicine, Shamanism, magic, esoterism and witchcraft, Art and salt, Tourism and salt, Religion Rituals and salt, Ecotourism and salt, Salt and science, Salt, astronomy and space exploration, Economy and salt, History and salt, Prehistory and salt, Lexicon and vocabulary of salt, Toponymy, Literature and salt, Salt inheritance, Archaeology and salt, Salt, Art rock and petroglyphs, Sal and technology, Health, healing and salt, Salt and industry, Salt and ancient costumes, Salt and indigenous culture, Salt and university education, Salt palaeontology, Salt and artcraft, Salt and environment, Microbial carpets and salt, Salt and biology, Salt and geology, Salt, beauty, cosmetics and make up, Cinema, music and arts of salt, Photography and salt, Salt and tanning leather, The Encyclopedia of Salt.

The 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Mar 31 @ 2:57 pm – 3:57 pm

 

Community: Resistance, Reclamation, and Re-Creation

Whose traditions get to be expressed, sanctioned and studied and whose do not?  When the exclusionary dominant version is the worldview accepted as official, what costs do communities outside the dominant group pay in terms of sustaining their traditions? How do power, privilege, whiteness, and intersectionality shape the story? Where are those structures that reinforce or challenge systems of exclusion?

As folklorists, we are committed to exploring the absent, invisible, and counter expressions of communities in our midst. These creations can be sites of re-creating community in the face of disruption, reclaiming traditional knowledge, and resisting the power structures that silence or marginalize them.

This year’s organizing team invites participants to examine, interpret and explore the breadth of this topic. Relevant topics especially include cultural issues facing transnational communities, New Americans and communities of color as well as other communities (e.g., disabilities, LGBTQ) whose identities and cultures have been invisible. The work of public folklorists and folklorists in the schools may have much to offer on this topic as well.  Of course, in addition to this topic, we encourage participants to explore the full dimensions of their scholarship, regardless of topic.

The 128th Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen friendships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required.

You can find more information about the meeting, including instructions for submitting proposals, beginning February 1, 2016, at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2017AM.

 Proposal submission deadline: March 31, 2017

Meeting Information:

October 18-21, 2017

Marriott City Center

Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Contact info:

Lorraine Walsh Cashman

American Folklore Society

Classroom-Office Building, Indiana University

1800 East Third Street

Bloomington, IN 47405

812-856-2422; fax: 812-856-2483

Apr
1
Sat
Bodies in Transition: Power Knowledge and Medical Anthropology Call for Proposals @ University of Lisbon, Institute of Social Sciences
Apr 1 all-day

BODIES IN TRANSITION – POWER, KNOWLEDGE AND MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
EASA Medical Anthropology Network
2017 Biannual Conference Network Meeting
5-7 July, Lisbon, Portugal
Local organization: Portuguese Anthropological Association (APA)
Conference presentation / theme: http://medanthlisbon2017.apantropologia.org/presentation/

PAPER PROPOSALS

To submit a paper proposal please choose the panel you find more adequate from the list of panels: http://medanthlisbon2017.apantropologia.org/list-of-selected-panels/

Send your proposal directly to the panel(s) convenor(s) using the email address(es) provided in the detailed information of each panel.

Paper proposals should be submitted in English and should consist of:
– Paper title, short abstract (up to 50 words), long abstract (up to 300 words);
– Name and e-mail of paper proponent with institutional affiliation.

Paper proponents should note that:
– For future reference, the leading proponent of a paper will be considered the author; the remaining proponent(s) will be considered co-author(s);
– Each author may only present one paper to the congress; an author may, however, serve as co-author in a second paper.

Deadline for paper proposals:  April 1st, 2017.

Paper proposals will be evaluated by panel coordinators. The list of papers accepted will be announced on April 15th, 2017.

The 9/11 Legacy: “History is Not Was, History Is” Call for Proposals @ National September 11 Memorial & Museum
Apr 1 all-day

The 9/11 Legacy: “History is Not Was, History Is

This past September, thousands of family members gathered at the 9/11 Memorial to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of 2001. At this site, the effects of that day are still obvious: memorial fountains where the Twin Towers once stood, the steady drone of construction on surrounding projects still underway, rebuilding the devastation left behind, and two large steel tridents that once formed part of the external façade of the North Tower visible through the windows of the 9/11 Memorial Museum’s entry pavilion. Here, the effects of terror are evident. Here, to quote Pope Francis on his own visit to the site in 2015, “grief is palpable.”

This conference, to be held at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum on the former World Trade Center site in lower Manhattan, will explore the broader legacy of 9/11. This was the most globally witnessed event in history and one that led to the longest war in the history of the United States. What, then, are the legacies that ripple out from the memorial fountains across the city, the country, and the globe? As William Faulkner observed, “History is not was, history is.” How has the event of 9/11 reverberated in our understanding of the past and in more contemporary social, political, and cultural life; in the economy, in war and peace, surveillance and security, the geopolitics of the Middle East, the refugee crisis and in the debates over identity, memory and sacred space? What historical processes might we trace – either backwards or forwards – from September 11, 2001? What news headlines can we connect to 9/11 in meaningful and instructive ways: Paris, Orlando, Istanbul, the Arab Spring, Aleppo, the death of Syrian refugee child Alan Kurdi, Edward Snowden, Russia, the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the list goes on…

We invite proposals for interdisciplinary papers and panels that consider the ways in which, to quote Mark Redfield in The Rhetoric of Terror, a “new history begins here at this calendrical ground zero.” We seek contributions, both empirical and conceptual, that consider the myriad ways that the events of September 11, 2001, continue to inform the past, the present and the future – both in the United States and around the globe.

Topics might include (but are not limited to):

–          9/11 and historiography

–          9/11 and periodization

–          Memory and memorialization

–          Sacred and contested spaces

–          “America in the world”

–          The conflicts in the Middle East and South Asia

–          Acts of terror around the globe since 9/11

–          The changing face of terrorism

–          The changing face of warfare and nation-building

–          Intelligence, surveillance and counter-terrorism

–          Para-legality, states of exception and rendition

–          Nationalism, identity, “self “and “other”

–          Human rights, civil liberties and conceptions of “freedom”

–          Shifts in cultural production and representation since 9/11

–          The media, social media and the “image” of terror

–          The academy, museums and cultural institutions

–          The return of religion

–          The refugee crisis

–          Discussions of time and space; home and homeland

We especially seek papers that draw on the intersections between these topics and themes in order to explore the ways in which they might (or might not be) traced back to, or through, 9/11. Do they have a narrative coherence shaped by the forces created that day in September? Or do they operate outside the event, as part of some other inevitable geopolitical shift that we now know only by that name-date even if that shift might have happened anyway?

We invite paper and panel proposals from scholars who can speak to the conference theme. We also seek contributions from practitioners, museum professionals and graduate students. Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words and CV to the conference organizers (Dr. Andrew Hammond and Dr. Lindsay Balfour) at 2017conference@911memorial.org by April 1, 2017. Panel proposals should include an additional abstract for the theme of the panel. Some financial assistance will be available to help offset the cost of attendance. Selected papers may be included in a follow-up edited volume/special edition.

Apr
5
Wed
Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges 2017 Meeting
Apr 5 @ 3:20 pm – Apr 8 @ 4:20 pm

The Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC) is holding its 2017 annual meeting in Boise, Idaho from April 5th-8th. The theme of the meeting is “Student Engagement Equals Student Success: Strategies for Teaching Anthropology.”

Meeting Registration through the AAA site is available here.

Meeting Essentials

When: April 5-8, 2017
Where: Boise, Idaho USA
Theme: “Student Engagement Equals Student Success: Strategies for Teaching and Learning Anthropology”

Meeting Details

* Papers and presentations will focus on pedagogical strategies and techniques for engaging and retaining students in our discipline among the various subfields.

* Participants will be inspired to learn tools and tips from colleagues on proven instructional methods and recommended resources that connect students with material in meaningful ways resulting in greater retention, increased student success, and stronger anthropology programs at community colleges.

* In addition to 1.5 days of papers and presentations, SACCFest participants will be thrilled to experience some of the outstanding aspects of history, ethnicity, gender, identity, and revitalization in our (perhaps surprisingly) diverse state of Idaho.

* This includes our designation as one of the premier refugee relocation centers in the United States, thriving Basque (dancers in photo) and Mexican-American communities, and the proud Native American tradition of Paiute, Shoshone, and Bannock peoples.

* This cultural diversity will be highlighted throughout SACCFest in both culinary and artistic experiences participants are sure to enjoy.

Apr
7
Fri
Observance of the International Day of Reflection on the on the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda
Apr 7 all-day

The Permanent Mission of the Republic of Rwanda and the United Nations Office at Geneva will mark the International Day of Reflection on the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda in a ceremony to be held on Friday, 7 april 2017 from 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Room XIX at the Palais des Nations.

The ceremony will include the message of Mr. Antonio Outen-es, Secretary-General of the United Nations, read by Mr. Michael M0ller, Director-General of the United Nations Office at Geneva, followed by his own remarks and statements of H.E. Dr. Frarnois Xavier Ngarambe, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Rwanda to the United Nations Office and other international organizations at Geneva, of a survivor of the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda and Mr. Caesar Murangira,  President of the Association  of Genocide survivors IB UKA, Memory and Justice (Swiss section).

The provisional programme of the event is below.

The NGO Liaison Unit of the Office of the Director-General  at the United Nations Office at Geneva invites non-governmental organizations to attend this event.