Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jun
19
Tue
AAA Department Leaders Summer Institute @ Science and Engineering Hall, George Washington University, Washington DC
Jun 19 @ 6:30 pm – Jun 21 @ 12:30 pm

The AAA Department Leaders Summer Institute is an opportunity to take part in face-to-face dialogue about the various challenges department leaders face in administering their departments and to share successful practices for meeting these challenges.

Tuesday, June 19, 2018
5:00 Registration
6:30 Opening Reception and Dinner (Provided)
Wednesday, June 20, 2018
8:00 Registration and Continental Breakfast
9:00 Welcome and Introductions – AAA President Alex Barker
9:15 Departments as a Force for Change – (Speaker)
10:00 Facilitated Breakout Groups:
-Leadership and Department Management
-Program Review and Assessment
12:00 Lunch (provided)
1:30 Plenary Discussion – Innovations in Pedagogy and Career Diversity
3:30 Break
3:45 Facilitated Breakout Groups:
-Doctoral Program Chairs
-MA / MS Program Chairs
-2- and 4-year Degree Program Chairs
5:30 Break
6:00 Dinner (provided) and Fun Evening Event
Thursday, June 21, 2018
8:00 Continental Breakfast
8:30 Facilitated Breakout Groups:
-Institutional Data
-Encouraging Research and Finding Funding
10:00 Break
10:15 Plenary Discussion – Making the Case for Advancing the Discipline
11:30 AAA’s Department Services Program – How Can AAA Help?
12:00 Wrap Up and Recommendations for 2020 Summer Institute
12.30 Adjourn
Jun
29
Fri
Unveiling the True Value of Thick Data Workshop
Jun 29 – Jun 30 all-day

Unveiling the True Value of Thick Data:
Innovation from Business Anthropology

Workshop organized by the Department of Economics and Business
at Central European University, Budapest Hungary

29-30 June 2018
CEU, 1051 Budapest, Nádor utca 15., room 203

Registration by 20 June

In an era dominated by the frenzy of gathering Big Data in all aspects of the institutional organizational and social lives of individuals, there is growing polarization between the strive towards quantity or quality in research and management practices.

Thick Data, an expression that originates from anthropological approaches developed by Clifford Geertz to the interpretation of cultures, is about a complex range of primary and secondary research approaches, including surveys, questionnaires, focus groups, interviews, journals, videos and so on. It is all qualitative informative materials, tools or techniques that help brands gather granular, specific knowledge about their target audience. In this way, these approaches can understand customer behaviour, analyse and adapt their marketing strategy according to consumer preferences, manage organizational change and lead the game in their industry.

This workshop brings together academic experts (from Europe and Asia) in the fields of business anthropology and sociology to discuss current research, and data-driven approaches to the application of Thick Data Analysis in management theory and practices.

 

Presenters and titles:


Davide Torsello
(Central European University, Hungary): The transmission of values in business corporations: an organizational ethnographic approach

Melinda Papp (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary): Consumer behavior in ritual consumption in contemporary Japan

Peter Lugosi (Oxford Brookes University, UK): Ethnographic provocation and experimentation: Disruptive insights in services and consumer research

Fiona Moore (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK): The Interview as Ethnographic Event in Qualitative Business Research

Marton Rovid (Central European University, Hungary): Trust and honesty: preliminary results of an ethnographic research at multinational companies in Hungary

Taran Patel (Grenoble Ecole de Management, France): Visual data in ethnographic research: Possibilities and challenges

Monika Balogh (Eotvos Lorand University, Hungary): The main sources of conflicts at Japanese owned industrial organizations in Europe. The ‘Nihonjinron’ in practice.

Tian Guang (Shantou University, China): Anthropology and Business: Towards the Chinese Characteristics

Lily Diaz-Kommonen (Aalto University, Finland): Quantified Self in the Context of Heritage

 

Networking and publication discussion will follow

Call for Proposals: Expanding Cooperation on Migration
Jun 29 all-day

The Second Annual Metropolis North American Migration Policy Forum

Expanding Cooperation on Migration: People, Economy, and Security in the Unites States, Mexico and Canada

The Mexican Secretariat of Foreign Affairs, Mexico City

Longstanding migration flows to and through North America are changing. Shifts in patterns—both driving policy change and responding to it—require fresh thinking across borders. Around the world, proliferating crises have increased the number of refugees and asylum seekers on the move, triggering enhanced border security and vetting protocols in many countries. Within North America, a well-worn north-bound migration pattern is complemented by an increasing southward flow to Mexico and beyond. This stream comprises both those who voluntarily migrate and those being repatriated. And within each North American country, there appear growing concerns about the capacity to receive and integrate new arrivals. Publics unevenly perceive the social and economic benefits of migration and question the government’s ability to effectively manage it. At the same time, under NAFTA, North America has seen reduced barriers to trade, investment and cross-border movement of goods and services. However, the agreement is currently under a contentious renegotiation among the three countries. While migration is not a core NAFTA issue, changes or outright cancellation of the agreement could have migration effects.

The second annual Metropolis North America policy forum builds on the foundational understanding gained at the inaugural forum in Washington, and seeks to identify areas where cooperation is occurring, possible and/or desired. Amidst the backdrop of shifting migration patterns and evolving relationships, approaches can benefit from imagination and should consider actors beyond national governments, including subnational levels and other sectors of society. The key aim of the Mexico City forum is to explore where expanded cooperation across the continent on migration can both promote security and grow the economy in all three countries. Building on innovative approaches and ideas, organizers will seek to bolster a North American migration research agenda that can support these opportunities with insight and analysis from a continental perspective.

Find below some suggested themes:

  • Labor Mobility
  • Temporary Foreign Workers
  • Family Migration
  • Economic Migration
  • International Students
  • Refugees
  • Credentials Recognition
  • Migration, Human Rights and the Law
  • Binational and Multinational Migration Agreements
  • Trade and Migration
  • Border Security
  • Border States and Cities
  • Governance of Immigration: The Role of Federal, State/ Provincial Governments
  • Immigration and the Specific Role of Cities and Municipalities
  • Citizenship
  • Public Safety
  • Settlement and Integration
  • Employment Training
  • Unaccompanied Minors
  • Emigration, Deportation and Return Migration

All sessions must have bilateral or trilateral participation from the United States, Mexico and/or Canada.
Workshops (90 minutes):

Workshops will usually consist of four to a maximum of 5 presentations of approximately 15 minutes each followed by at least 20 minutes of discussion. Workshop coordinators will preside over the session or designate another individual to do so.

Roundtables (90 minutes):

The roundtable format is suitable for more informal discussions of emerging issues or to unpack controversial topics. It is a very effective format for the exchange of information and experiences among a relatively small number of people. The organizer or designated person chairs the roundtable with bi/tri national discussants. An 8 person limit per roundtable discussion is recommended because of the desire to actively engage all participants in the session and the physical arrangement of the tables around which the discussions will take place.

SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL
Please note that you will be required to include the following information with your submission:

  • Name and contact information
  • Format of your session (workshop or roundtable)
  • Title of your session
  • Names of co-organizers (if applicable)
  • Names of presenters including their affiliation, email address and titles of their presentation
  • 50-word abstract which will be included in the program (please make sure it is descriptive, but is also formulated to interest as many conference participants as possible)
  • 250-word summary for consideration by the Adjudication Committee Your proposal should be emailed to Sarah Kooi ([email protected])
    by June 29th, 2018.
Jun
30
Sat
Seventh Anthropological Film Festival at The Jerusalem Cinematheque
Jun 30 all-day

The Seventh Anthropological Film Festival at The Jerusalem Cinematheque is on its way (November 2018) and we are now open for entries.

We would be very happy to get your films 2017–2018

The registration deadline is June 30th, 2018

Eligibility requirements are:

  • Screeners must be submitted online vimeo private link valid until June 30th 2018,  to my mail address: [email protected] 
  • Works must be subtitled in English
  • Works previously refused by the Anthropological Film Festival- Jerusalem can not be resubmitted.
  • A list of the selected films will be available via our website homepage in early September 2018.

The Festival selects films that document and explore human societies and cultures in their many facets, such as, social and cultural diversity, continuity and change, relationship with the environment and to promote dialogue between cultures.

We welcome submissions of documentary films made by anthropologists, students, and professional filmmakers; we welcome films at least 45min. long all varieties and styles of filmmaking.

The festival is a joint project of the Jerusalem Cinematheque-Israel Film Archive and the Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

Call for Proposals: Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life
Jun 30 all-day

Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life

ABOUT THE SERIES:

How are urban processes entangled with human experiences? In this series, scholarly monographs and edited volumes explore this question and illuminate diverse forms of such entanglement through empirically-based research. This series emphasizes anthropological approaches to the study of human life in relation to the urban. It seeks to illuminate experiences and effects of urban cultures and situate specific cases in a comparative set. By exploring the intricacies of human-urban relations, this series contributes to better understanding of the ways that humans particularly conceive of and experience nature, personhood, ethics, culture, and social life.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

To submit a manuscript for consideration by Lexington Books, please send:

  • a prospectus (see below for details)
  • a detailed table of contents
  • one or two sample chapters
  • your curriculum vitae

If you are proposing a contributed volume, please include titles, affiliations, and brief resumes for each of the contributors, as well as chapter abstracts.

The prospectus should include:

  1. A description of the book, describing the core themes, arguments, issues, goals, and/or topics of the work, what makes it unique, what questions it seeks to answer, and why you are qualified to write it. (2-5 pages)
  2. A description of your target audience (undergraduate or graduate students? scholars? professionals?).
  3. An analysis of competing or similar books (including publishers and dates), indicating distinctive and original elements of your project that set it apart from these other works.
  4. A list of courses in which your book might be used as a text or supplementary text, indicating the course level at which this book may be used.
  5. An indication of whether any part of your manuscript has been published previously, and if it is a doctoral dissertation, what changes you are proposing to prepare it for publication.
  6. The length of the manuscript either as a word count or a page count (12-point type on double-spaced 8.5”×11” pages). Will there be figures, tables, or other non-text material, and, if so, approximately how many? If the text is not complete, please still estimate its final length, not including the non-text material.
  7. If the manuscript is not complete, an estimation of when it will be finished. Is there a particular date by which you hope the book will be published (due to a historical anniversary, conference, etc.?
  8. The names of four to seven respected scholars in your field with whom you have no personal or professional relationship. Include their titles, affiliations, e-mail addresses, and/or mailing addresses.
  9. An indication of whether the manuscript is under consideration by other publishers.

Please do not send your entire manuscript.

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Jessica Bodoh-Creed is lecturer of anthropology at California State University.

Melissa King is assistant professor of anthropology at San Bernardino Valley College

Leonido Gines Jr. is lecturer of architecture at De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, and founder of studioGINES.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact: Jessica Bodoh-Creed ([email protected]), Leonido Gines Jr. ([email protected]), and Melissa King ([email protected])

Jul
1
Sun
2018 AIIS Fellowships to India
Jul 1 all-day

The American Institute of Indian Studies announces its 2018 fellowship competition and invites applications from scholars who wish to conduct their research in India. Junior fellowships are awarded to PhD candidates to conduct research for their dissertations in India for up to eleven months. Senior fellowships are awarded to scholars who hold the PhD degree for up to nine months of research in India. The application deadline is July 1, 2018.

The AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDIAN STUDIES is a cooperative, non-profit organization of eighty-four American colleges and universities that supports the advancement of knowledge and understanding of India, its people, and culture. AIIS welcomes applicants from a wide variety of disciplines. In addition to applicants in the Humanities and Social Sciences AIIS encourages applicants in fields such as Development Studies, Natural Resources Management, Public Health, and Regional Planning.

Applications to conduct research in India may be made in the following categories:

Junior Research Fellowships . Available to doctoral candidates at U.S. universities in all fields of study. Junior Research Fellowships are specifically designed to enable doctoral candidates to pursue their dissertation research in India. Junior Research Fellows establish formal affiliation with Indian universities and Indian research supervisors.  Awards are available for up to eleven months.

Senior Research Fellowships . Available to scholars who hold the Ph.D. or its equivalent. Senior Fellowships are designed to enable scholars in all disciplines who specialize in South Asia to pursue further research in India. Senior Fellows establish formal affiliation with an Indian institution. Short-term awards are available for up to four months. Long-term awards are available for six to nine months. A limited number of humanists will be granted fellowships paid in dollars funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Senior Scholarly/Professional Development Fellowships . Available to established scholars who have not previously specialized in Indian studies and to established professionals who have not previously worked or studied in India. Senior Scholarly/Professional Development Fellows are formally affiliated with an Indian institution. Awards may be granted for periods of six to nine months.

Senior Performing and Creative Arts Fellowships . Available to accomplished practitioners of  the performing arts of India and creative artists who demonstrate that study in India would enhance their skills, develop their capabilities to teach or perform in the US, enhance American involvement with India’s artistic traditions, and strengthen their links with peers in India. Awards will normally be for periods of up to four months, although proposals for periods of up to nine months can be considered.

Non US citizens are welcome to apply for AIIS fellowships as long as they are either graduate students or full-time faculty at a college or university in the U.S. Citizens of the United States, however, can apply for senior fellowships if they are not affiliated with an institution of higher education in the U.S. The fellowship competition is open to all applicants and is NOT restricted to applicants from AIIS member institutions. Fellowships are funded by both U.S. government grants as well as AIIS endowment funds. Most of the federal funds received are restricted to US citizens; non-US citizens and performing/creative arts fellows are generally funded by the AIIS endowment. The number of fellowships AIIS can offer depends on the funding available from the different sources, though all applicants are reviewed equally and simultaneously.

The AIIS strongly encourages applications from non-US citizens and US citizens alike, and remains committed to providing research opportunities to all qualified candidates regardless of nationality.  It also seeks additional private support to increase the number of its awards. Fellowships are funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (also available to permanent residents); the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States State Department and the Council of American Overseas Research Centers under the Fulbright-Hays Act of 1961, as amended; and the Smithsonian Institution. Fellowships for six months or more may include limited coverage for dependents.

Applications can be downloaded from www.indiastudies.org.

For more information please contact the American Institute of Indian Studies:

Website: www.indiastudies.org

2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition
Jul 1 all-day

2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology announces our annual poetry competition as a means to encourage scholars to use alternative literary genres to explore anthropological concerns. These concerns may be any of those associated with any of the five fields of anthropology: Archaeological, Biological, Linguistic, Sociocultural and Applied. Deadline: July 1, 2018. There is no entry fee for this competition. Please email your entry (no more than three unpublished poems) as a single pdf document to: [email protected] without the author’s name (anonymized), along with a separate cover page with the following information by the Deadline of July 1, 2018:

  • NAME, TITLE, INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION (S)
  • CONTACT INFO (ADDRESS, PHONE, EMAIL)
  • POEM TITLE (S)
  • ETHNOPOETRY STATEMENT*

The anonymous entry pdf must include an *ethnographic statement (of no more than 400 words) which connects the poem(s) submitted to anthropology which will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections. Examples of ethnographic statements can be found in the poems published in Anthropology and Humanism: (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anhu.12058/full).

Before you submit a manuscript to the competition, please consider exploring the work of the ethnographic poets we have published. We’re drawn to technical virtuosity combined with abundant imagination, vivid imagery, and musical approaches to fresh language, risk-taking, and an ability to convey penetrating insights into human experience. We seek a layer of trust concerning the writer’s experience and perspective as both anthropologist and creative writer, one who is ethically responsible in terms of representing the other, one who is able to locate his or her reader in the context of the ethnographic study and reveal anthropological themes associated with any of the fields of anthropology.

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose in November 14-18, 2018. The first-place winner(s) will receive a certificate and award of $100. All entries will be considered for publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. (Note that Membership in AAA or an institutional subscription is required for digital access to the journal and SHA membership with the paid print option is required to receive a print issue.)

JUDGES: Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor, Nomi Stone, & Ather Zia 

The Nineteenth Century Studies Association Award and Prize
Jul 1 all-day

The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2019 Emerging Scholars Award. The work of emerging scholars represents the promise and long-term future of interdisciplinary scholarship in nineteenth century studies. In recognition of the excellent publications of this constituency of emerging scholars, this award recognizes an outstanding article or essay published within six years of the author’s doctorate or other terminal professional degree. Entrants must have less than seven years of experience either in an academic career, or as a post-terminal-degree independent scholar or practicing professional. The winning article will be selected by a committee of nineteenth-century scholars representing diverse disciplines. The winner will receive $500 to be presented at the annual NCSA Conference in 2019. Applicants are encouraged to attend the conference at which the prize will be awarded.

Entries can be from any discipline and may focus on any aspect of the long nineteenth century (the French Revolution to World War I), must be published in English or be accompanied by an English translation, and must be by a single author. Submission of essays that are interdisciplinary is especially encouraged. Articles that appeared in print in a journal or edited collection between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018 are eligible for the 2019 Emerging Scholar Award; if the date of publication does not fall within that span but the work appeared between those dates, then it is eligible. Essays published in online, peer-reviewed journals are considered to be “in print” and are thus eligible.

Deadline for submission is July 1, 2018.

++++

The Nineteenth Century Studies Association (NCSA) is pleased to announce the 2019 Article Prize, which recognizes excellence in scholarly studies from any discipline focusing on any aspect of the long nineteenth century (French Revolution to World War I). The winning article will be selected by a committee of nineteenth-century scholars representing diverse disciplines. The winner will receive a cash award of $500 to be presented at the Annual NCSA Conference in 2019. Applicants are encouraged to attend the conference at which the prize will be awarded.

Entries can be from any discipline, must be published in English or be accompanied by an English translation, and submission of essays that are interdisciplinary is especially encouraged. Articles that appeared in print in a journal or edited collection between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018 are eligible for the 2019 Article Prize; if the date of publication does not fall within that span but the work appeared between those dates, then it is eligible. Essays published in online, peer-reviewed journals are considered to be “in print” and are thus eligible. Articles may be submitted by the author or the publisher of a journal, anthology, or volume containing independent essays.

Deadline for submission is July 1, 2018.  

Send a PDF file electronically of published articles/essays, including the publication’s name/volume/date etc., to the chair of the committee at the following email address: [email protected]. All submissions via email will be acknowledged; queries should be addresses to Professor Emily Burns at the same email address. Articles submitted to the NCSA Emerging Scholars Award competition are ineligible for the Article Prize; one entry per scholar or publisher is allowed annually.

Conference presenters may only apply for one conference travel award in a given year.

Jul
2
Mon
Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition
Jul 2 all-day

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology is pleased to announce that we are opening our annual writing contest for Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction. We celebrate the use of creative literary prose genres to explore anthropological concerns, and we encourage you to share your work with us.

As a guideline, ethnographic fiction and creative nonfiction use literary elements to bring stories to life and engage the reader. Whether fiction or nonfiction, these creative prose pieces reflect insights about the real world seen through an anthropological lens or reflecting an anthropological sensibility (related to any field of anthropology).

Submissions should not exceed 20 pages typed double-spaced, and need to work as stand-alone stories. There is a limit of one submission per applicant.

We do expect contestants to be affiliated with the field or practice of anthropology and/or ethnography in some manner. There is no entry fee for this competition.

Submission deadline is July 2, 2018. Submissions must be previously unpublished and not currently under consideration elsewhere.

Please email your entry as two pdf documents to: [email protected] The entry should consist of two files:

  1. 1)  Your story (double spaced) with title but without the author’s name (anonymized), PLUS an extra final page with a statement of no more than 400 words that answers the question: “How is this piece anthropologically informed and in what ways has your background in the field contributed to it?” This statement will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections.
  2. 2)  A separate cover page with your full name, title of your submission, mailing address, email address, and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

JUDGES: Julia Offen (Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Editor, Anthropology and Humanism), John Wood (Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville), Katrina Daly Thompson (Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison), and Caitrin Lynch (Professor, Olin College)

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized in a ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose, CA 11/14/2018 – 11/18/2018.

The first-place winner will receive an award of $100 and publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. The second-place winner will receive $75. And the third-place winner will receive $50. All winners will receive a certificate of their award.

Jul
5
Thu
2018 William T. Grant Scholars Program
Jul 5 all-day

Just released, the 2018 William T. Grant Scholars Program Application Guide for early career researchers! The Guide details our research focus areas, as well as case examples, eligibility requirements, application procedures, submission instructions, and selection criteria for Scholars awards.The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas.

The online application opens on April 23, and the deadline to submit an application is July 5, 2018, 3:00 PM EST.