Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jan
24
Thu
International Conference: Peoples and Cultures of the World  @ Palermo University
Jan 24 – Jan 26 all-day

Call for papers: Peoples and Cultures of the World 

International Conference
Palermo University, January 24-25, 2019
Building 19, Viale delle Scienze, Aula Seminari A and B

Deadline for submitting proposals: 30 November 2018

Abstract: 250 words (max)
Duration of each paper: 20 minutes
Official languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish

Registration to the Conference is free of cost. Travel, accommodation and food costs are to be covered by participants.

Scientific coordination:
Leonardo Mercatanti and Stefano Montes

Organizing committee:
Irene Majo Garigliano, Leonardo Mercatanti, Giovanni Messina, Stefano Montes, Alessandro Morello, Gaetano Sabato, Flavia Schiavo, Licia Taverna

Administration:
Department of Cultures and Societies, Palermo University
Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italy

Please send your paper and short biodata to:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Information:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Jan
28
Mon
Call for Proposals: AES / ALLA / ABA Joint Spring 2019 Conference
Jan 28 all-day

Conference Theme: Ethnographic Futures
Hosts: AES / ALLA / ABA
Conference Dates: March 14 to 16, 2019
Location: Washington University in St. Louis
Website: https://americanethnologist.org/meetings/spring-conference/aes-2019
CfP deadline: January 28, 2019
Registration Prices: Students $40 / $45 (member / non-member); Professional $140 / $145 (member / non-member
Travel Diversity Grant deadline & information: January 28; [email protected]

 

Call for Paper Abstracts for Proposed Panels

View proposed panels seeking paper abstract submissions HERE.

Abstract Submissions for Panels, Individual Papers, and Roundtables

AES, ALLA, and ABA invite proposals for individual papers, organized paper panels, and roundtables for our joint Spring 2019 Conference. Word limit for abstracts: paper up to 250 words; Session/panel up to 500 words. Submit HERE.

When submitting your proposal, you will be asked to either (a) provide your own theme(s), or (b) select from the list of pre-determined themes provided by the program committee. These themes will be used during the review and scheduling processes to reduce content overlap. If your submission does not align within one of the themes, you may select “other” and provide your theme(s) as written responses.

Pre-determined Themes:
Theorizing the Future
Methodology: Innovations, Conundrums & Engagement
Violence, Trauma & Resistance
Citizenship & Belonging
Debt & Repayments
Queer & Other Intimate Imaginings
Sanctuary & Refuge
Migration, Mobility & Borders
The State, Surveillance & In/Exclusions
Race, Ethnicity & Class Formations
Gendered Spaces & Subversions
Embodiment & the Body
Emancipatory Politics & Solidarity
Urban Futures
Health, Healing, and Ethics
Environmental Justice
Labor & Work
Consumption & Desire
Others proposed by submitters

The submissions portal closes Monday, January 28, 2019 (3pm ET).

Jan
31
Thu
Call for Contributors: What Anthropologists Do, Veronica Strang (2nd edition)
Jan 31 all-day

Dear Fellow Anthropologists,

We are in the process of updating an introductory ‘primer’ in Applied Anthropology, entitled What Anthropologists Do, which was initially published in 2009.

The intention was originally to introduce the subject to school leavers or first year undergraduates, who often have little idea about what anthropology is, or what anthropologists do. The purpose of this second edition remains primarily to encourage people to study anthropology and also to illustrate the wide variety of careers now available to anthropologists. The book has also become widely used in undergraduate anthropology courses, to help people think about the areas they want to focus on as they progress.

The text has a secondary purpose: many potential employers of anthropologists – industries, agencies and government organisations – also have little familiarity with anthropology as a discipline, and thus only rarely make use of anthropologists and their particular skills. By providing them with a highly accessible and updated introduction to the subject, the volume will – it is hoped – encourage greater use of anthropology and the potential insights provided by ethnographic research.

What we are looking for this time are exciting new examples of research and short autobiographical accounts describing people’s experiences in applying anthropology, especially in emergent areas.

If you would like to be involved in helping to get our discipline ‘out there’, please have a look at these new areas (below). Depending on your level of enthusiasm and ability to spend some time on this, you could send some brief examples of your current research and how you have applied anthropology. How did you get involved, and what difference has the inclusion of anthropology made in your work? (If I quote you or make broader use of your comments, this will be acknowledged.) 

And/or you could offer a short autobiographical account (1000-2000 words) of your work as an applied anthropologist, possibly including some feedback about it from the people with whom you have worked. If you think you might like to do this, please write a brief outline (about 200 words), and attach a CV as well as your contact details.

We do hope that you will support this continuing effort to encourage wider engagement with our discipline. So if you are doing some good things with anthropology, please let us know, sending responses to either [email protected] or [email protected].

Initial drafts/suggestions should be submitted by the end of September, so that we can spend October reviewing possible items to include. The deadline for the inclusion of final drafts for approved content is January 31st, 2019.

Many thanks,

Veronica Strang and Joanna Puckering

 

Summary of new areas, update for 2nd edition.

Introduction

A more substantial body of literature to mention, including basic introductions to anthropology and to professional practice.

Chapter 1. Anthropology and Advocacy

Debates on GM and related issues – new issues such as:

Neonicotinoids

Fracking

Biofuels etc.

Indigenous rights and mining issues, eg. Standing Rock

Debates about ecological justice/rights for nature

Efforts to declare rivers as ‘living ancestors’ and ‘legal persons’

Advocacy more directly in relation to non-human rights and conservation

Human rights:

More focus on displacement

Treatment of refugees

Human trafficking

Modern slavery

Rights to clean water

Rights to sanitation

Freshwater resources

Water security

Chapter 2. Anthropology and Aid

General updating with ongoing research on (and critiques of) international aid development

Medical humanitarianism

More on involvement of anthropologists in participatory action research

Material about gypsies could be updated

Chapter 3. Anthropology and Development

Ecotourism

Emergent conflicts around tourism taking over cities (eg. Barcelona, Lisbon)

Displacement of local residents in favour of profitable Air B&B accommodation etc.

Dams continue to be controversial

Diversion of limited freshwater resources into irrigation

Chapter 4. Anthropology and the Environment

Impacts of the patterns of freshwater use (and see Ch3)

Plastics in the ocean

Tipping points in extinctions

Air quality issues

Energy production/consumption

Fisheries policy (and Brexit)

Conservation controversies over big cat protection

Updates to climate change debates / anthropological perspectives

Archaeology and historical archaeology

Heritage:

 – Recent controversies over Stonehenge tunnel would update that material

 – Lighthouses and heritage

 – Land and identity

 – Strengthen the material on urban identities

Chapter 5. Anthropology and Governance

Recent rise in populism, Brexit etc.

Rising influence of social media

Anthropology’s involvement in public policy development

Changes in managerial cultures

Corporatisation of health and education institutions (schools and universities)

Continued rise of transnational corporations; their ownership of key resources and utilities

Involvement of anthropology in military and covert government activities

Chapter 6. Anthropology, Business and Industry

Business and digital developments:

 – Advertising etc. via Facebook (and related controversies)

 – Virtual realities/cyberspace

 – Online gaming

 – Employment of anthropologists by Google, Microsoft etc

Anthropologists working with unions/on industrial action

New methods such as UX (user experience) testing

Professional behaviour

Gender relations

Gender pay gap

Chapter 7.  Anthropology and Health

Sex/reproduction/technologies

Changes in the last decade, eg. issues:

 – Surrogacy

 – Sperm donation

 – Abortion

 – Child rearing

Emergent issues about millennials and health

Changes in approaches to mental health

Huge issues (especially in the UK) about the demographics of aging, dementia etc.

Related concerns around health provision:

 – NHS

 – Health insurance in the US etc.

Major new outbreaks of disease, eg. Ebola (importance of anthropological understandings)

Forensic anthropology – continues to expand, especially in relation to disaster zones

Chapter 8. Anthropology, Art and Identity

 Standalone ‘identity’ related topics

 Those expressed via art and material culture

The former:

New work dealing with gender and sexuality, eg.

 – Same sex marriage

 – Transgender issues

 – Adoption etc.

Discussions about race:

 – Re-emergence of the extreme right wing and its effects

Breakdown of federal states, eg. Scotland and Catalonia, efforts to achieve independence and outcomes to date

Visual anthropology and representation:

 – Museums

 – Cultural heritage

 – Archaeology and historical archaeology

Development and (both tangible and intangible) cultural heritage

Visual anthropology and social intervention

Chapter 9. Interdisciplinary Anthropology (New chapter)

Situations in which interdisciplinary research involves (and is assisted by the involvement of) anthropology

Issues around how anthropology is applied

The need to provide students with practical training in engaging with other disciplines

The perspectives of non-academic professionals, industry specialists etc.

Engaging with alternate forms of expertise involves:

 – seeking shared research questions

 – common theoretical framework

 – navigating sometimes difficult issues, eg. disciplinary identity, territoriality, power, access to funding, disciplinary status

Conclusion

Additional section providing a vision of where anthropology is heading in the future.

 

Feb
1
Fri
Lake Atitlan Ethnographic Field School
Feb 1 all-day

19th Annual Ethnographic Field School

When: Summer, June 2 to July 14, 2019

Where: Lake Atitlán, Guatemala

What: Learn how to design, conduct, investigate and write up your own independent project while living with a local family on the shores of Lake Atitlán, Guatemala. Throughout the program, you will learn about Maya culture while developing skills in project design and fieldwork as you carry out your own research project.

Who: All Majors welcome! This program is open to students from any major and all universities. Whether you are an undergraduate, a graduate student, or just finished college, learning how to collect data and talk to people is beneficial not only for those in anthropology, but also for those in many other majors, including sociology, international studies, public health, history, education, textiles, natural resource management, business and management, sociolinguistics, political science, psychology, design and engineering.  Anyone interested is encouraged to apply. We work with students with a variety of interests to help develop individualized research projects.

How: See what research is really like, do your own project, manage your own time and work according to the needs of your topic. Challenge yourself by living in a Maya community with a local family. We keep the seminars to a minimum, so students can have enough time to work on their projects; we want students to learn by doing, with intensive and in-depth hands-on learning.

Costs: The $4000 fee includes room and board, insurance, in-country travel, and tuition for 6 credit hours (airfare not included- about $600). Get in touch with us for ideas about funding your study abroad experience!

Apply: Apply through the CSUDH Study Abroad Website.  Visit the Guatemala EFS Program website for more information and photos from previous years. The application deadline is February 1, 2019. Applications received after this time are accepted on a rolling basis as space permits.

Contact us: Dr. Sarah R. Taylor [email protected]; Dr. Tim Wallace [email protected]

NAPA-OT Field School Guatemala 2019
Feb 1 all-day

*The NAPA-OT Field School in Antigua, Guatemala is now recruiting students for its four-week summer session: June 17 – July 12, 2019. *

The field school offers transdisciplinary learning to promote leadership in social justice through collaboration with Guatemala-based NGO and other community partners.

*Graduate students and upper division undergraduate majors in anthropology, occupational therapy, public health or related disciplines are encouraged to apply via our website www.napaotguatemala.org by February 1, 2019.  Admissions decisions will be made on a rolling basis. * The field school is a project of the NAPA-OT SIG (National Association for the Practice of Anthropology – Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group) of the American Anthropological Association. Faculty include anthropologists, public health practitioners, and occupational therapists with credentials and interests in health care access and human rights, child development, and global health.

The objectives of the program are:

  • To explore efforts to achieve social and occupational justice in Guatemala, a country with a history of ethnic and class violence
  • To question the role of global health and development programs in creating lasting change in support of health as a human right
  • To explore the concept of “occupational justice” as an emerging practice area in occupational therapy, global health, and applied anthropology, focusing on occupational capacity
  • To examine health disparities in Guatemala through applied medical anthropology theory and human rights discourse
  • To understand the determinants of health and basic epidemiology in Guatemala
  • To provide a transdisciplinary fieldwork opportunity to students of occupational therapy, anthropology, and related subjects
  • To promote social justice through partnerships in and around Antigua, Guatemala, with NGOs, community groups, health care workers, and other social change agents

 

*Applicants students will have the opportunity to work in one of three project groups:*

  • *PEDIATRIC NUTRITION:  SOCIAL AND OCCUPATIONAL OUTCOMES OF UNDERNOURISHED CHILDREN*
  • *HEALTH PROVIDER PERSPECTIVES: INTERRELATIONSHIPS OF THE PUBLIC, PRIVATE, AND PHILANTHROPIC SECTORS WITHIN THE GUATEMALAN HEALTH SYSTEM*
  •  *SURGICAL MISSIONS:  CRITICAL HUMANITARIANISM*

 

Students also will study Spanish a minimum of 9 hours per week, working one-on-one with certified language instructors at their own level and pace.  Visit our website for more information at www.napaotguatemala.org

Feb
15
Fri
25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

Feb
20
Wed
Summer 2019 OSEA Ethnography Field School in México
Feb 20 all-day

Summer 2019 OSEA Ethnography Field School in México

 

Six Week Program:  June 2 to July 13: http://www.osea-cite.org/program/ethnography_overview.php

Four Week 1:  June 2 to June 29

Four Week  2: June 16 to July 13

<http://www.osea-cite.org/program/ethnography_overview.php/#fourweekprogramdates>

——————————

 

OSEA Maya Language Immersion, FLAS Eligible

 

OSEA Intensive Spanish

 

Where:   Chichén Itzá, Yucatán México

 

Enrollment & Applications: http://www.osea-cite.org/apply/application.php

  • Enrollment Opens Dec. 10 2018
  • Early Enrollment by Jan 20, 2019, $300 discount
  • Regular Enrollment by February 20, 2019

 

Students learn to do ethnography, while conducting individual or team projects on:

  • Archaeological ethnography — life histories of Maya who lived in Chichén Itzá
  • Tourism Ethnography — Studying tourist experience
  • Gender Studies — Maya sexualities, dating & concepts of self & person
  • Globalization — Maya subcultures, youth
  • Visual ethnography — photographic ethnography of Maya art, everyday life
  • Heritage Studies — Maya concepts of ruins, politics of the past as commodity
  • Anthropology of Food — identity through diet/food in globalized cultures
  • Medical Anthropology — illness narratives, healing, suffering, Self
  • Economic Anthropology — gendered strategies & visions of life success

 

Visit www.osea-cite.org for program details

 

Mar
1
Fri
2019 International Field School on Site Formation, Stratigraphy, and Geoarchaeology in the Athenian Agora
Mar 1 all-day

International Field School on Site Formation, Stratigraphy, and Geoarchaeology in the Athenian Agora

 

Deadline: March 1, 2019

 

The Malcolm H. Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Science (ASCSA) in collaboration with the ASCSA Excavations at the Athenian Agora offers a full week-long Field School on Site Formation, Stratigraphy, and Geoarchaeology in the Athenian Agora. Dr. Panagiotis (Takis) Karkanas, director of the Wiener Laboratory and Paul Goldberg, Professorial Research Fellow University of Wollongong, will supervise the intensive field school. Registered students will be involved in interdisciplinary field research in the Athenian Agora primarily focused on archaeological context, geoarchaeology, and material sciences. Through field observations, laboratory analysis, and lectures, the students will receive instruction in the study and analysis of archaeological sediments and deposits, as well as gain experience in the recording of stratigraphy, and the understanding site formation processes. A maximum of 12 students will be accepted for the course. Preference is given to advanced students and post-docs with a background in archaeology, and preferably some exposure to the natural sciences as well.

The cost for Room and Board is 300 euros for the entire week. Travel costs to Greece and to the site are not included.

The course will take place from June 2 to 8, 2019. Applications should be submitted no later than 1st March via the online application form: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/127620/international-field-school-on-site-formation-stratigraphy-and-geoarchaeology-in

Application materials include one paragraph explaining why the candidate is interested in participating in the course, a CV, a list of grades (unofficial transcript), and names and email addresses of two referees.

Participants who successfully complete the course of instruction will receive a certificate detailing the content of the field school.

Textbooks: Reconstructing Archaeological sites 2019 by Panagiotis Karkanas and Paul Goldberg (Wiley Blackwell), Practical and Theoretical Geoarchaeology 2006 by Paul Goldberg and Richard I. Macphail (Blackwell) and Microarchaeology 2010 by Stephen Weiner (Cambridge University Press).

A syllabus will be emailed 3 weeks before the start of the field school.

For further information or questions, please contact Dr. Panagiotis (Takis) Karkanas at  [email protected].

2019 UVic Archaeology Field School in Barkley Sound
Mar 1 all-day

Applications accepted now

Dates: July 1st – August 9th, 2019
Credits: two 1.5-credit courses (ANTH 343 & 344)
Application deadline: March 1st, 2019

6 weeks – 2 courses – 3 UVic credits

UVic Archaeology field school in Barkley Sound is a six-week field school hosted by the UVic Department of Anthropology and the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre on southwestern Vancouver Island. The field school takes place in the lands and territories of two neighbouring Nuu-chah-nulth Nations, Tseshaht and Huu-ay-aht.

The first four days of the field school will be based in Victoria followed by two and a half weeks of remote camp-based fieldwork in Tseshaht First Nation territories in the Broken Group Islands in Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. The final 3-weeks of the course will be spent in Huu-ay-aht First Nation territory at the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre (a UVic supported teaching and research facility in Barkley Sound) where students will conduct laboratory analyses and prepare written research reports on recovered archaeological material. This course will be an immersive 6-week field experience (including hiking, camping, and boat travel) and require full days and dedicated teamwork.

For more information, please visit the field school blog here.

Information on how to apply here: https://onlineacademiccommunity.uvic.ca/coastalfieldarch/apply-to-the-field-school/

Call for Papers: Place Branding and Consumption of Heritage
Mar 1 all-day

Special Issue “Place Branding and the Consumption of Heritage”

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section “Sustainability of Culture and Heritage“.

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2019

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050) calls for original research on the synergisms between the geographic attributes of place (regions, countries, cities, towns and landscapes) and how consumption —through tourism or via consumer goods and services—creates a special niche in regional and global economies. While globalization aims to homogenize consumer tastes and preferences, public and private stakeholders increasingly draw on folklore, culture, history, and the tangential attributes of landscape to add value to consumer and tourist experiences. Together, these synergisms portend a sustainable approach to improving the human condition in an increasingly borderless and limitless realm of consumption and tourist experiences. This process, however, is fraught with tension as different narratives about authenticity and heritage emerge. Accordingly, we seek contributions from across the social sciences and business fields that use both case-study and empirically-anchored perspectives, as well as approaches at broader, theoretical and meta-analytical levels, to explore these aspects of place-branding.

Topics might range from the rise of agricultural tourism (wine-circuits and viticulture, specialty produce), micro-breweries, social justice museums (the American south, Eastern Europe), and the burgeoning literature on “Made in [fill in the country],” to ways in which local, regional, and national products enlist color, music, story-telling, cultural icons, and myth-making to couple consumption or tourism-marketing strategies with place attributes.

The Guest Editor guarantees a timely yet thorough review and turnaround of all submissions. Sustainability, whose Impact Factor this fifth year of open-access publication is 2.075, is an international, scholarly journal whose peer-reviewed papers highlight the  environmental, cultural, economic, and social sustainability of human beings. It is indexed by SCIE, SSCI, and other databases.

If you have interest in this special topic issue, please provide a 150-word abstract first before formal submission. Looking forward to your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Joseph L. Scarpaci
Guest Editor

References

  • Arnould, E. J., & Thompson, C. J. (2005). Consumer culture theory (CCT): Twenty years of research. Journal of consumer research31(4), 868-882.
  • Ashworth, G., & Larkham, P. (2013). Building a new heritage (RLE Tourism). Routledge.
  • Dinnie, K. (2015). Nation branding: Concepts, issues, practice. Routledge.
  • Fehimović, D. & Ogden, R. (Eds.) (2017) Branding Latin America: Strategies, aims, resistance. Lexington Books.
  • Graham, B. J., & Howard, P. (Eds.). (2008). The Ashgate research companion to heritage and identity. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • Graham, B., Ashworth, G., & Tunbridge, J. (2016). A geography of heritage: Power, culture and economy. Routledge.
  • Holt, D.B. (2004). How brands become icons: Principles of cultural branding. Harvard Business School.
  • Manning, P. & Ulisashvili, A. 2008. “Our Beer”: Ethnographic brands in postsocialist Georgia. American Anthropologist 109 (4): 626-641.
  • Morales, E. & Scapraci, J.L. (2012). Marketing without advertising: Brand preference and consumer choice in Cuba. Routledge
  • Park, H.Y. (2014). Heritage tourism. Routledge.
  • Pettygrove, M., & Ghose, R. (2018). From “rust belt” to “fresh coast”: Remaking the city through food justice and urban agriculture. Annals of the American Association of Geographers108(2), 591-603.
  • Pike, A. (2009). Geographies of brands and branding.  Progress in Human Geography, 33(5):  619-645.
  • Rivera, L. A. (2008). Managing “Spoiled” national identity: War, tourism, and memory in Croatia. American Sociological Review 73(4): 613-634.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2005), Plazas and barrios: Heritage tourism and globalization in the Latin American centro histórico. University of Arizona Press.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2007). Globalization tourists and heritage tourists in American culture: The case of Latin American historic districts. Material Culture 39 (2): 1-16.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2016). The meaning of objects. Material Culture 48:1-9.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Coupey, E. & Reed, S. 2018. Artists as cultural icons:  The icon myth transfer effect as a heuristic for cultural branding. Journal of Product & Brand Management. 27(3): 320-333.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Portela, A.H. (2009). Cuban landscapes: History, memory and place. Guilford.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Sovacool, B.J., and Ballantyne, R. (2016). A critical review of the costs of advertising: A transformative consumer research perspective. Journal of Consumer Policy 39 (2): 1-22.
  • Schor, J.B. & Holt, D.B. (2000) The consumer society reader. The New Press.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • place branding
  • heritage
  • consumer goods
  • tourism
  • cultural geography/cultural anthropology

Published Papers
This special issue is now open for submission.