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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

May
1
Wed
2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies
May 1 all-day

2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is pleased to announce that the 2019 ACIP workshop will be African Ethnographies. The project was proposed and will be organized by colleagues at the University of the Western Cape, Jung Ran Annachiara Forte (Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology) and Sakhumzi Mfecane (Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology and Sociology). Activities will take place in Cape Town, South Africa.

African Ethnographies
While the practice of ethnography has a long history in Africa, insufficient debate has emerged around it recently on the African continent. Far from being specific only to anthropology, ethnography has become a widespread mode of knowing inside and outside academic spaces. We would like to prompt reflection around this concept and practice, which is slippery, changing, dense, polysemic, and composed of a plurality of voices. The African Ethnographies workshop will raise questions about ethnography across disciplines, its contemporary forms – not exclusively written, and its publics. Ethnography enables conceptual work that transcends simple divides between the empirical, the methodological, and the theoretical. The workshop is particularly interested in understanding how ethnography and its conceptual work can allow us to grasp the complexities of contemporary African worlds, their precariousness, and their becomings. We are interested in exploring: (1) the work of theorization that ethnography makes possible; (2) understandings of public ethnography today; and finally (3) ways to re-rethink ethnography from the African continent. The workshop seeks to open a space of dialogue by bringing together emerging scholars across different disciplines and from institutions across Africa. By engaging in discussions around theory, methods, public engagements, and ethnographic sensibilities and modes of expression, we hope to better understand the challenges of doing ethnography in Africa’s contemporary worlds. The workshop will include a performance/ lecture that explores the performative potential of ethnographic work and will result in both an edited book and a film about ethnography based on the workshop and interviews with participants.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

Information about applying to organize the 2020 ACIP workshop and for the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards will be available in November 2018. The deadline for both workshop applications and student applications is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund.

Call for Proposals to Organize a 2020 Workshop
May 1 all-day

AFRICAN CRITICAL INQUIRY PROGRAMME

“Who defines the needs of the people and the related epistemologies that serve them?” (Karp & Masolo 2000:10)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO ORGANISE A WORKSHOP

Closing Date: Wednesday 1 May 2019

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organise a workshop to take place in 2020. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions, and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular questions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational forms, or institutional forms from diverse methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that bring into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

 

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energise conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organisations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organisations, NGOs, or others appropriate to the topic. Abstracts for previously funded ACIP Workshops are available here.

 

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2020.
  • a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  •  a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  • a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organisers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape for basic financial administration and are responsible for complying with CHR policies. Workshop organisers should submit a letter from the host institution, centre, programme, or department confirming that appropriate administrative and institutional support will be available.

We ask Workshop organisers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organisers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organisations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches, or specialisations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply: Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  •  abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement defining the proposed Workshop theme and focus, its significance, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organising the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organiser)
  • institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop. Please describe available administrative and logistical support in this letter and/or your work plan
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organisation, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

 

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

 

Conceptualisation: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions, and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross- institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed Workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

 

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

 

Workshop organiser(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organising the Workshop, including previous administration/organisation and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds, and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

 

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

 

Applicants who organise an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research.

After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Wednesday 1 May 2019. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2020 Workshop Proposal” to [email protected]

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html  https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

CFP: Arctic Futures 2050 Conference
May 1 all-day

Call for Poster Abstracts

Arctic Futures 2050 Conference

4-6 September 2019

Washington, D.C.

Poster Abstract Submission Deadline: Wednesday, 1 May 2019

Poster Information and Abstract Submission Guidelines


The Arctic Futures 2050 Conference Organizing Committee invites abstracts for posters. The Arctic Futures 2050 Conference—convened by the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH: https://www.searcharcticscience.org)—will be an international conference designed to enhance collaboration between Arctic scientists from many disciplines, diverse Indigenous knowledge holders, and policy makers from all levels of government. The conference will be held 4-6 September 2019 at the National Academies of Sciences in Washington, D.C.

Poster sessions will be held during each day of the conference as an integral part of the agenda and expansion of the plenary sessions. Posters will offer opportunities to provide specific information relevant to the main themes of the conference, including:

  • Knowledge of the Arctic environment derived from field observations, Indigenous observations, laboratory measurements, or modeling.
  • Policy initiatives, activities, and methods—from all levels of government.
  • Descriptions of what we need to know to respond to a changing Arctic from Indigenous, scientific, or policy perspectives.
  • Tools or processes for informing policy with science or Indigenous Knowledge.
  • Tools or processes for informing knowledge holders and producers about policy needs.
  • Approaches that have supported collaboration across disciplines.
  • Ideas for addressing obstacles that limit collaboration across disciplines and geographies.
  • Other topics—relevant to collaborations needed to effectively respond to a changing Arctic environment—are welcome.

In addition, you may email [email protected] if you would like to present your work through another format, for example, through art or another creative platform.

Current sponsors of the Arctic Futures 2050 Conference include the National Science Foundation’s Arctic Sciences Section, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, and the American Geophysical Union. Conference partners currently include ArcticNetArctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS), and the Wilson Center’s Polar Initiative.

For more information about poster abstract guidelines and submission, go to: https://www.searcharcticscience.org/arctic-2050/conference-2019/submit-abstract

For more information about the Arctic Futures 2050 Conference, go to: https://www.searcharcticscience.org/arctic-2050/conference-2019

For more information about the conference, email Brendan P. Kelly, SEARCH Executive Director, at [email protected]. For questions about poster abstracts, email: [email protected]

CFP: Veganism as Engaged Anthropological Theory
May 1 all-day

Engaging Anthropology Conference
University of Massachusetts Amherst
October 3-6, 2019
Amherst, MA

 

Session: “Veganism as Engaged Anthropological Theory”

 

Human domination over all global systems in the anthropocene has impacted nonhuman animal lives in diverse and wide-reaching ways, from the mass consumption of meat to the devastation of natural ecosystems. Carol J. Adams, through her feminist-veg critical theory, has exposed the “sexual politics of meat” and its ongoing perpetuation by the patriarchy [1]. The meat and dairy industries are sustained by reproductive control and the objectification of female bodies. Achieving universal gender equality must necessarily involve the dissolution of these exploitative industries. In addition, the increasing quantity of meat eaten in the United States is a runaway byproduct of the ideological legacies of colonialism and imperialism. Among the forms of resistance to this is a new grassroots Afro-Vegan movement that reclaims traditional foodways and employs “veganism as a tool to overcome systemic race-based oppression” [2]. Veganism can therefore be a performative feminist and de-colonizing stance that rejects and bears witness to both human and nonhuman animal injustices.

What are the ways in which systems of oppression present in human societies are reflected in our interactions with nonhuman animals? How can a vegan theoretical lens help us imagine and make alternative worlds possible? I welcome papers from various disciplines that seek to address these and related questions, productively exploring the interface between human culture and nonhuman animal lives.

To be considered for this organized session, please send a short abstract (200 words) of your proposed paper topic and a brief biographical statement by May 1, 2019 to Danielle Raad, [email protected]. Feel free to reach out if you have any questions, or are interested in participating and would like to discuss potential topics.

For more information on the conference: https://www.umass.edu/anthro/engaging-anthropology

 

[1] Carol J. Adams, The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory (New York : Bloomsbury Academic, 2015).

[2] Afro-Vegan Society, accessed March 26, 2019, https://www.afrovegansociety.org.

May
9
Thu
The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020
May 9 all-day

The CALA 2020 – The (Annual) Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia, February 5 – 8, 2020

http://cala2020.upm.edu.my

Information

Following the success of the CALA 2019, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2019, in Cambodia, we announce The CALA 2020, February 5-8, 2020, at The University Putra Malaysia, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia.

 

The CALA seeks to redefine scholarship on Asian Language and Society.

Purpose and Structure

The CALA 2020 invites Linguists, Anthropologists, Linguistic and Cultural Anthropologists, Culturologists, Sociologists, Political Scientists, Ethnologists, and those in related fields pertinent to Asia, to discuss work, and engage in scholarly collaborations, thus forming global networks.

Location

University Putra Malaysia

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Partners

  • Taylor and Francis Global Publishers (Official Publishing Partner)
  • 60 major academic institutions globally
  • Scientific Committee of over 100 academics

Publications

Journal Special Issues, and Monographs, from papers submitted that meet publication requirements. Papers selected will be published with Top-Tier journals. Here, ample assistance will be provided to revise manuscripts.

Dates

Abstract and poster proposal submission – November 17, 2018 – May 9, 2019

Notification of acceptance – No later than May 10 2018 (for those submitted prior to this)

Registration

Early bird – March 10, 2019 – June 14, 2019

Normal bird – June 15, 2019 – September 25, 2019

Presenters must register by September 25, 2019, to guarantee a place in the program. Registration will remain open after this, but conference organizers cannot guarantee placement in the conference.

Late bird – September 26, 2019 – February 8, 2020 (Conference end)

Conference dates

Wednesday February 5, 2020 – Saturday February 8, 2020

Final day comprises optional Anthropological excursion (separate cost)

Abstract submissions

The Call for Abstracts is now open, at http://cala2020.upm.edu.my, which contains all information

Anthropological Excursion

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Theme

Asian Text, Global Context

The CALA 2020, February 5-8, 2020, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia, will follow on from the success of the CALA 2019, in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The CALA 2020 will thus expand on work on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, as well as Asian Language and Society. Here, the global Linguistic Anthropologists will gather to discuss work on Linguistics, Anthropology, and Language and Society, in and of Asia, and beyond.

With an increased focus on the significance of Asian Language and society, the Annual CALA Conference has emerged at an appropriate time, opportuning academics from the West to tap into, and work with, Academia in the East. Scholars in institutions throughout Asia increasingly affiliate with the CALA network, as do those in Western contexts, to explore the vast possibilities of the Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, academically, and socioculturally, where the CALA network has now well contributed and has significantly boosted research, publications, and academic networks, globally.

Themed Asian Text, Global Context, The CALA 2020 will represent over 400 years of East-West global interaction, communication, and transnationalism. Throughout, symbolisms of Asian ‘texts’ have been significantly emphasized, (re)interpreted, contested, and distorted, while employed for cultural and political purpose. Asian texts have become highly representational, authenticating and legitimizing sociopolitical and cultural devices, where their potency should not be undervalued. Never have these texts shown more significance than in the present, as their intensified use, and their qualities in Asian identities long contested, seek this Linguistic Anthropological exploration.

The Asian text has thus regenerated itself as a semiotic, in that, as a verbal, non-verbal, and visual artifact, it encompasses the whole semiotic spectrum of that which is performatively Asian, and that which is distinct from the Non-Asian, yet a text which can interlink the East and the West, through a multitude of textual modes. The continuous recentralizations and recontextualizations of Asian texts, both locally and globally, have hence become vital to representations of Asia, Linguistically, Anthropologically, Socioculturally, Politically, and much more.

The CALA 2020 thus calls for renewed interpretations of Asian texts, and asks that we seek new perspectives of these complex texts, in global contexts. These interpretations increase in significance as; return migration to Asia is now a salient factor in transnational flows; online texts and their textual modes now compete ever more enthusiastically to effect disjunctures in previously Western dominated technologies; ontological conceptions of life and social interaction now increasingly draw from Asian philosophies, sociocultural models, lifeworlds, and Asian urban anthropologies, thus producing interstices for new or revised textual and textualized semiotics; the entangled complexities and intersubjectivities of political, sociocultural, and religious practices and their constraints, motivate engagements in interfaith dialogue, shifting ethnic demarcations, and sociopolitical interventions. Ultimately, the massive sets of Eastern demographics, and their expansive sets of social dynamics, models, and praxes, continue to uniquely inform and (re)complexify productions of Asian texts, in both local and in global contexts.

Strands

Abstract and poster proposals should address one or more of the key strands related to Asian countries and regions:

  • Anthropological Linguistics
  • Applied Sociolinguistics
  • Buddhist studies and discourses
  • Cognitive Anthropology and Language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Ethnographical Language Work
  • Ethnography of Communication
  • General Sociolinguistics
  • Islamic Studies and discourses
  • Language, Community, Ethnicity
  • Language Contact and Change
  • Language, Dialect, Sociolect, Genre
  • Language Documentation
  • Language, Gender, Sexuality
  • Language Ideologies
  • Language Minorities and Majorities
  • Language Revitalization
  • Language in Real and Virtual Spaces
  • Language Socialization
  • Language and Spatiotemporal Frames
  • Multifunctionality
  • Narrative and Metanarrative
  • Nonverbal Semiotics
  • Poetics
  • Post-Structuralism and Language
  • Semiotics and Semiology
  • Social Psychology of Language
  • Textualization, Contextualization, Entextualization

Presentation lengths

  • Colloquia – 1.5 hours with 3-5 contributors (Parts A and B are possible, thus 6-10 contributors)
  • General paper sessions – Approx. 20-25 minutes each, including 5 mins for questions/responses
  • Posters – to be displayed at designated times throughout the CALA 2020

Submission Guidelines (via the online submission website, or by email (see below))

General session papers

  • 18-word maximum presentation title
  • 400-word maximum abstract, including references

Colloquia

  • Submission of only the main abstract for colloquium required
  • Abstract must contain the colloquium main description, and a summary of each individual paper within the colloquium

Evaluation of proposals

All abstracts for general sessions will be double blind reviewed.

Main parent abstracts for colloquia will be double blind reviewed. All abstracts for individual presentations within each colloquia will not be peer reviewed, but are expected to be at a standard commensurate to the colloquium parent abstract.

Review criteria are as follows:

  • Appropriateness and significance to CALA themes
  • Originality/significance/impact of the research
  • Clarity/coherence of research concerns
  • Theoretical and analytical framework(s)
  • Description of research, data collection, findings/conclusions, rhetoric, and exegesis as a whole
  • For colloquia, importance/significance of the overarching topic and/or framework(s) addressed, and its coherence of and with individual presentations.

For more information, please contact:

Chair

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Hazlina Abdul Halim

Head, Dept. of Foreign Languages

Faculty of Modern Languages & Communication

Universiti Putra Malaysia

[email protected]

Head of Communications

Ms. Nhan Huynh

[email protected]

http://cala2020.upm.edu.my

May
15
Wed
Sixth Biannual Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples’ Conference
May 15 all-day

Sixth Biannual Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples’ Conference
September 12-14, 2019, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA, USA

Conference Website: www.gonzaga.edu/erip

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/360309841479769/

Proposals for individual papers, posters, pre-organized panels and roundtables can be submitted in Spanish, English, and Portuguese at the conference’s website.

Deadline for submission of proposals: May 15, 2019

About the Conference and Call for Papers

This conference is organized by the Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples section of the Latin American Studies Association (ERIP-LASA), in collaboration with Gonzaga University and the Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies journal (LACES). ERIP has more than 400 members representing diverse academic disciplines, including anthropology, history, sociology, political science, linguistics, Spanish and Portuguese, geography, literature, and the law. ERIP is committed to the promotion of research, teaching, and the exchange of ideas about all topics related to ethnicity, race relations, Indigenous peoples, Afro-descendants and other ethnic or racial groups in Latin America, the Caribbean, and across the Americas.

The ERIP 2019 Conference provides an opportunity for academics, graduate students, activists and practitioners in all the relevant disciplines to present panel, paper, and poster proposals on issues related to ERIP’s mission and areas of interest in the study of Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Americas.

ERIP 2019 seeks to bring together scholars from across disciplines, community-based knowledge producers, and activists whose work addresses contemporary and historical conceptions of indigeneity, ethnicity, and race and how these notions intersect with various political, cultural, social, legal, and economic projects that have engendered divisions, inequities, violence, and dispossessions within and across nation-states and the hemisphere. Submissions might explore impacts and legacies of colonialism and decolonization, imperialism, state-formation, citizenship regimes, populism, neoliberalism, extractivism, democratization, and/or pluriculturalism; as well as historical and contemporary contexts of resistances, non-Western paradigms, insurgencies, and civic and social movements undertaken by Indigenous and minority communities across the Americas. ERIP 2019 intends to provide a forum for discussion, debate, and critical engagement with respect to best paths moving forward in the face of complex challenges facing our contemporary world. Panels, papers, and posters on topics that engage the conference theme, “Bridges and Walls Across the Americas: Dialogues of Survivance, Endurance, and Resistance” are especially welcome and encouraged.

Travel Grants: ERIP, LACES, and Gonzaga University have jointly established a fund to assist participants’ travel from Latin America and the Caribbean, on a competitive basis.  Instructions for travel grant applications can be found at the conference website: https://www.gonzaga.edu/ethnicity-race-indigenous-peoples-conference/registration/travel-grants

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THE CONFERENCE:
Email: [email protected]
Phone: +1 (509) 313-6783

Jun
1
Sat
2019 Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Meeting
Jun 1 all-day

We are pleased to announce the Call for Participation for the 2019 Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Meeting, October 17-19 in Portland, Oregon.  Our conference theme is “The Profession of Sociological Practice.” Please see the text below and attached flyer.  We would appreciate it greatly if you would forward this mail to colleagues in your department, and others who may be interested in attending a professional conference dedicated to advancing the social and behavioral sciences in work, occupations, professions, and organizations, as well as networking with applied, clinical, and engaged public sociologists, and other professionals, at the 2019 AACS Annual Meeting.

Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Conference, October 17-19, 2019.  Portland, Oregon.  Theme: “The Profession of Sociological Practice.” In the last quarter century, applied and clinical sociologists have marshalled significant momentum  to “professionalize” sociological practice.  Join sociologists who serve the public in sundry occupations in the academic and non-academic workplace and professional marketplace.  Open to all sociologists, social and behavioral scientists, and professionals who use social and behavioral science in business and industry, government, and academia.  AACS Annual Meetings attract practicing sociologists and other professionals from around the world who know how to make a difference.

We don’t just present “papers” at AACS –  we look for innovation and creativity in content and presentation form.  Consider leading a professional development workshop, panel, roundtable, or poster session.  Proposals that address teaching with an applied focus are also invited.  Do you have a project to submit for the Social Design Award?  Learn More.  Program participants are invited to submit their presentations to the Journal of Applied Social Science, AACS’s Official peer-refereed journal, for publication.

AACS has a reputation as a student-friendly Association.  Our annual meetings offer mentoring opportunities for students.  Students who attend AACS Annual Meetings are encouraged to submit their papers for the Undergraduate and Graduate Student Paper Competition.  Student teams are welcome to participate in the Client Problem-solving Competition.

AACS pre-conference professional development workshops are available on Thursday afternoon for a modest additional charge for non-members.  Registration includes welcome and closing receptions, complimentary breakfasts by Embassy Suites with stay, keynote and presidential luncheons, and refreshments.

Deadline: June 1, 2019. For more information, please visit AACS at https://www.aacsnet.net/, and explore the Conferences tab.

2019 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition
Jun 1 all-day

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology announces our annual poetry competition as a means to encourage scholars to use alternative literary genres to explore anthropological concerns. These concerns may be any of those associated with any of the five fields of anthropology: Archaeological, Biological, Linguistic, Sociocultural and Applied.

Deadline: June 1, 2019.

There is no entry fee for this competition. Please email your entry of no more than three unpublished poems as a single pdf document to: [email protected] without the author’s name (anonymized), along with a separate cover page with the following information:

  • NAME, TITLE, INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION (S)
  • CONTACT INFO (ADDRESS, PHONE, EMAIL)
  • POEM TITLE (S)
  • ETHNOPOETRY STATEMENT*

The anonymous entry pdf must include an *ethnographic statement (of no more than 400 words) which connects the poem(s) submitted to anthropology which will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections. Examples of ethnographic statements can be found in the poems published in Anthropology and Humanism: (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anhu.12058/full).

Before you submit a manuscript to the competition, please consider exploring the work of the ethnographic poets we have published. We’re drawn to technical virtuosity combined with abundant imagination, vivid imagery, and musical approaches to fresh language, risk-taking, and an ability to convey penetrating insights into human experience. We seek a layer of trust concerning the writer’s experience and perspective as both anthropologist and creative writer, one who is ethically responsible in terms of representing the other, one who is able to locate his or her reader in the context of the ethnographic study and reveal anthropological themes associated with any of the fields of anthropology.

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, November 20-24, 2019. The first-place winner(s) will receive a certificate and award of $100. All entries will be considered for publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. (Note that Membership in AAA or an institutional subscription is required for digital access to the journal and SHA membership with the paid print option is required to receive a print issue.)

JUDGES: Ather Zia, Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor, Leah Zani & Nomi Stone

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2019 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition
Jun 1 all-day

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology is pleased to announce that we are opening our annual writing contest for Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction. We celebrate the use of creative literary prose genres to explore anthropological concerns, and we encourage you to share your work with us.

As a guideline, ethnographic fiction and creative nonfiction use literary elements to bring stories to life and engage the reader. Whether fiction or nonfiction, these creative prose pieces reflect insights about the real world seen through an anthropological lens or reflecting an anthropological sensibility (related to any field of anthropology).

Submissions should not exceed 20 pages typed double-spaced, and need to work as stand-alone stories. There is a limit of one submission per applicant.

We do expect contestants to be affiliated with the field or practice of anthropology and/or ethnography in some manner. There is no entry fee for this competition.

Submission deadline is June 1, 2019. Submissions must be previously unpublished and not currently under consideration elsewhere.

Please email your entry as two pdf documents to: [email protected]

The entry should consist of two files:

  1. Your story (double spaced) with title but without the author’s name (anonymized), PLUS an extra final page with a statement of no more than 400 words that answers the question: “How is this piece anthropologically informed and in what ways has your background in the field contributed to it?” This statement will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections.
  2. A separate cover page with your full name, title of your submission, mailing address, email address, and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

JUDGES: Julia Offen (Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Editor, Anthropology and Humanism), John Wood (Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville), Katrina Daly Thompson (Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison), Caitrin Lynch (Professor, Olin College), and Helle Bundgaard (Associate Professor, University of Copenhagen).

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized in a ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, November 20-24, 2019.

The first-place winner will receive an award of $100 and publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. The second-place winner will receive $75. And the third-place winner will receive $50. All winners will receive a certificate of their award.

Jun
4
Tue
Seventh Congress of the Portuguese Anthropological Association
Jun 4 – Jun 7 all-day

7th CONGRESS OF THE PORTUGUESE ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION
Lisbon, 4-7 June, 2019 (NOVA – School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidade Nova de Lisboa)

Submission of paper proposals: until January 7, 2019

The period for submission of paper proposals is open until January 7, 2019. The 7th Congress of the Portuguese Anthropological Association (APA) will take place between June 4 and 7, 2019 in Lisbon, at NOVA – School of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. To submit a paper proposal to the congress, proponents should first consult the list of approved panels and identify the most appropriate panel for their paper proposal. Paper proposals should be addressed directly to the panel coordinators using the contacts provided with the detailed information of each panel.

List of approved panels: http://apa2019.apantropologia.org/en/approved-panels/
Rules to submit a paper proposal: http://apa2019.apantropologia.org/en/call-for-papers/

The 7th APA congress aims to discuss the condition of being human and being in the world today, 2019. A year of a possible calendar among many other available. Without identifying themes, reference words, categories or classifications, 2019 marks a stage in the social and natural history of the planet. The openness suggested in an ‘untitled’ congress also points to an anthropology without conceptual, thematic or epistemological boundaries. It is life in itself that interests anthropology, anthropologies, thinking the gerund of human existence, others and the rest from multiple interpretive possibilities. After all, anthropology is practiced on everything and everyone in a project of knowledge that remains inexhaustible in terms of what exists and is to come.

By simply proposing 2019, APA recognizes that the terrain of anthropology goes beyond the most obvious – on the most immediate scales of perception possible from the condition of being human. In a time when we also talk about societal, anthropocentric, climate change or end of the world challenges, the intentionally open proposal is an invitation to think about everything that affects the past, present and future unequally lived by humans and nonhumans.

2019 marks the 30 years of APA as an Association that represents anthropology and anthropologists who speak Portuguese or who work in Portugal. It is a congress celebrating a journey seen as a process under construction and for which so many have contributed. May 2019 be the first of more 30 years of Portuguese anthropology in the world.

Further information: http://apa2019.apantropologia.org/