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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Oct
15
Tue
CFP: Just Code: Power, Inequality, and the Global Political Economy of IT
Oct 15 all-day

Just Code: Power, Inequality, and the Global Political Economy of IT

Just Code is a one and a half day CBI symposium/workshop on how code—construed broadly, from software routines to bodies of law and policy—structures and reinforces power relations. It will explore the often invisible ways that individuals and institutions use software, algorithms, and computerized systems to establish, legitimize, and reinforce widespread social, material, commercial, and cultural inequalities and power imbalances. The event will also examine how individuals, unions, political organizations, and other institutions use code to fight for equality and justice. Other major themes include the (pre-)history of code/algorithmic thinking; code as means of concealment or secret communications; codes of conduct in business, governance, and culture related to IT and its institutions (local and global exploitation through imperialism, human rights violations, and environmental degradation); and codes of ethics in information technology. The papers will draw from across the humanities and qualitative social sciences, including disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, science and technology studies, geography, and communications. We anticipate that papers (collectively) will examine a wide range of themes in the global business, cultural, social, legal, and environmental history of the political economy of information technology. Papers will be pre-circulated (among presenters) and we have plans to publish revised papers (after editorial and peer review) as an edited volume in the Springer History of Computing Book Series.

 

Submission and Dates

Proposals should include a two-page curriculum vitae and a 300 to 450 word abstract (as a single PDF) that highlights the key argument(s), connection of the paper to the symposium’s topic/themes, and a description of core methods/sources.  This should be sent to cbi at umn.edu (please have your last name in the file name and use the subject line “Just Code Symposium Proposal”).

Deadline for Paper Proposals is Oct. 15, 2019 (notifications will be made within 30 days)

Deadline for Submission of Papers (for those offered and accepting a place on the program) is March 31, 2020 (papers will only be pre-circulated to fellow presenters/panelists on the program, not to all registrants).

Those offered and accepting a spot on the program will have to commit to participating in the entire workshop, revising their work based on feedback from peers at the event and the organizers/editors, and submitting it for consideration to the planned edited volume.

For those offered and accepting a place on the symposium’s program (presenters/panelists), CBI will cover the cost of 2 nights lodging at a nearby hotel (walking distance to CBI), lunch, and an event dinner. Early career presenters on the program (graduate students, postdocs, and junior faculty) can apply for CBI travel grants of $300 to partially offset their travel costs (done as a reimbursement/partial reimbursement). Please indicate if you would like to be considered for one of these travel grants at the bottom of your abstract.  The program will commence at 8:30 AM on Friday May 8 and conclude at 12:30 PM on Saturday May 9. Registration is automatic for everyone on the program.

For those wanting to attend who are not presenting, the symposium’s registration is free and open to CBI Friends (and those who become CBI Friends), and to students, academic staff, and faculty of the Univ. of Minnesota.  Lunch is provided for all who register. The event dinner is only for those on the program. Information on becoming a CBI Friend is at http://www.cbi.umn.edu/about/friends.html

Registration form for those attending but not presenting. The size will be capped, so we encourage registering far in advance. https://forms.gle/KK5n37jhN1Mdnyxp9

The event will be at CBI–Andersen Library at the University of Minnesota

CFP: 2020 Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology
Oct 15 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 80th Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, NM, March 17-21, 2020.  The theme of the Program is “Cultural Citizenship and Diversity in Complex Societies.”

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution.  We welcome papers from all disciplines.  The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2019.  For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/).

Oct
21
Mon
CFP: 2020 Southern Studies Conference at AUM
Oct 21 all-day

CFP: Southern Studies Conference, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL January 31-February 1, 2020

 

Now in its twelfth year, the Southern Studies Conference, hosted by Auburn University at Montgomery, explores themes related to the American South across a wide array of disciplines and methodologies.

Registrants to the two-day conference enjoy a variety of peer-reviewed panels, two distinguished keynote speakers, and a lecture and exhibition by a visiting artist. This coming year, the Conference includes an opening reception the evening of January 30th, a professional session oriented towards graduate student attendees, a graduate student poster session competition, and a voluntary Montgomery-based cultural outing on the afternoon of Saturday, February 1st.

The 2020 Southern Studies Conference keynote speakers and visiting artist are distinguished Southern historian Dan T. Carter, who will reflect upon the future of Southern Studies as a discipline; Jodi Skipper, Associate Professor of Anthropology & Southern Studies at University of Mississippi; and photographer Johanna Warwick, whose exhibition “The Bottom” engages with issues of race, class, urban planning, and the built environment in Baton Rouge, LA.

The 2020 Conference Committee invites proposals for pre-formed 90-minute panels or individual twenty- minute academic papers or creative presentations on any aspect of Southern Studies (broadly defined), including those relating to the fields of anthropology, geography, art history, history, literature, theater, music, communications, political science, economics, and sociology. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Southern Economies
  • Southern food studies
  • Pedagogy and the teaching of Southern topics
  • Canonicity and the South
  • Slavery and the American South
  • Civil War narratives
  • Southern archives, museums, and collections
  • Civil Rights narratives
  • Southern Geographies
  • Explorations of race and conflict in the South
  • Religion in the South
  • Southern literature
  • History of science or medicine in the South
  • Southern arts (in any medium or genre)
  • Southern architecture
  • Explorations of the Southern worker
  • Southern politics
  • Anthropological studies of the South
  • Sociological studies of the South
  • Southern music
  • Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
  • Native American topics of the South
  • Stories of immigration/migration and border- crossings
  • Contemporary re/mis-conceptions of “The South”
  • Presentations by artists/performers/writers working in the South/making work about the South

Proposals can be emailed to [email protected] Please submit a 250-word abstract and a 2-page cv for an individual twenty-minute academic paper or creative presentation proposal. Pre-formed 90-minute panel applications should include a 250-word description of the panel, list of speakers and chair/respondent, if applicable, and individual 2-page cvs for each participant.

The deadline for submission is Monday, October 21, 2019. Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend, if accepted. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by November 2019. For more information, visit the conference website, or contact Naomi Slipp, Conference Director and Assistant Professor of Art History, Auburn University at Montgomery: [email protected]

Nov
1
Fri
Embodiment and literacies: Teaching, learning, and becoming in a post- world CFP
Nov 1 all-day

Special issue call for papers from English Teaching: Practice & Critique

Special Issue of English Teaching: Practice and Critique

Embodiment and literacies: Teaching, learning, and becoming in a post- world
Guest Editors: Stavroula Kontovourki, Elisabeth Johnson, Grace Enriquez

In recent years, there has been a surge in literacy studies research that transgresses views of literacy as a set of skills or socially situated meaning-making practices to reconfigure meaning making at the intersection of human subjects and materials. Following broader trends in the social and humanist sciences, such ontological, epistemological, and axiological reconfigurations rework notions of agency, politics, and ethics (e.g., Barad, 2003; Davies et al., 2013; Lather & St. Pierre, 2013; St. Pierre, 2014). This re-theorization has been instantiated in the renaming of literacies as im/material (Burnett et al., 2014), post-human (Kuby & Rowsell, 2017), and trans- (Stornaiuolo, Smith, & Phillips, 2017). Across such work, we see a concern with flows, emergences, difference, and potential: flows of affect and cognition and in connected space-times, entanglements of humans and nonhumans, unexpected encounters and meaning-making practices, transgressions and possibilities of/for new matterings and becomings (e.g., Boldt & Leander, 2017, Ehret, Hollet, & Jocius, 2016; Leander & Ehret, 2019; Marsh, 2017). These post-era trends emphasize how meanings of literacy and learners’ identities flow in connected space-times, where humans and nonhumans are entangled and unexpectedly encountered. These flows, entanglements, and encounters make new ways of mattering and being possible.

Within this broader move, we see much value in understanding literacy as embodied, (i.e., as of material bodies, subjective feelings, and produced identities, interacting across non-human materials, spaces and times, while risking and affirming recognition). This understanding invites researchers and educators to examine different ways bodies matter in literacy teaching and learning; to wonder how literate bodies (of educators and learners) are simultaneously disciplined and disciplining; feeling and affective; impossible to represent but also possible to present anew; and thus, mobile and indeterminate (Johnson & Kontovourki, 2016). In effect, one is invited to consider literate bodies as not only acting and feeling objects, but also as sites where humans, materials, and ideas entangle to make up particular meanings of literacy, of pedagogy, and of people.

Focusing on literacy pedagogies, we invite submissions that foreground bodies and incorporate premises of different post- theories to engage with questions like:

  1. Whose bodies are recognized as relevant (or not) at different pedagogical moments? How are recognitions tied to norms that circulate social relations and ways teachers and students mis/recognize their roles in defining what matters as literacy?
  2. What feelings and emotions circulate at the entanglement of bodies, texts, and objects, illuminating spaces of control and possibility? How can emergent difference and transformation speak back to structures like schooling? In what moments can this newness even be paradoxical, violent, and potentially inequitable?
  3. What kinds of meaning-making occur as students disrupt expectations or teachers follow the lead of students or materials? How do unexpected engagements across bodies and materials help us re-imagine literacy in school and other institutional spaces?

Considering the embodiment of literacy in these terms constitutes an ethico-political project of tracing the boundaries of literacies and literacy pedagogies in a post- world. Maintaining the focus on criticality, this special issue aims to contribute to the art of the im/possible by showcasing examples of practice where both possibility and constriction, paradoxes of newness and difference, inclusion and exclusion emerge.

Submission Details
Submissions for this Special Issue must be made through the ScholarOne online submission and peer review system. Please refer to the ETPC Author Guidelines for guidelines on submissions, including word limits. For inquiries on the special issue, you may contact Stavroula Kontovourki ([email protected]), Elisabeth Johnson ([email protected]), or Grace Enriquez ([email protected]).

Submission date: November 1, 2019

Nov
7
Thu
Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting @ Bloomington, Indiana
Nov 7 – Nov 10 all-day

Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting – Bloomington, IN, Nov 7-10, 2019

The Society for Ethnomusicology will hold its 64th Annual Meeting on November 7-10, 2019, at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The meeting will be hosted by Indiana University in conjunction with the IU Bicentennial (1820-2020). For the Call for Proposals, abstract submission instructions, and preliminary meeting information, please visit the SEM 2019 area of the SEM website (www.ethnomusicology.org).

In conjunction with the SEM Annual Meeting, two concurrent pre-conference symposia will be presented on November 6: “Film as Ethnography, Activism, and Public Work in Ethnomusicology” and “Heritage and the Politics of Inclusion in Latin American Brass Bands.”

Visit the conference website for more information about the Annual Meeting, pre-conference symposia, online registration, and hotel accommodations.