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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Nov
30
Fri
CFP: SLACA Spring 2019 Conference
Nov 30 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS & POSTERS
SLACA SPRING 2019 CONFERENCE
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
April 11-13, 2019

Featuring Keynote Kearney Lecture by Dr. Yarimar Bonilla (Rutgers)

Reconstructions: Material, Political, and Theoretical Renovations

 

Reconstructions is an invitation to consider the ways in which anthropology has been involved in ongoing processes of building and rebuilding Latin America and the Caribbean both materially and intellectually. As the title suggests, we understand reconstruction as a form of renovation that includes the transformation of material and political landscapes, the renewal of intellectual trends and discussions, and recent engagements with old and new issues. Reconstruction also suggests that we look beyond deconstruction and reflect on how Latin America and the Caribbean are sites of constant debate on the reconstruction of their past legacies and future directions.

The Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology (SLACA) welcomes paper and poster submissions under the conference theme Reconstructions. We invite theoretical and empirical analyses that address reconstruction in Latin America and the Caribbean. We particularly encourage members to submit abstracts dealing with the reconstruction/renovation of the following: borders (materially and symbolically); national and regional identities; material landscapes impacted by climate change, natural disaster, and political mobilizations; legal and judicial systems; and racial, ethnic, class, and gender politics.

Submission of abstracts must be done through SLACA’s website. Please visit http://slaca.americananthro.org to submit your abstract on or before November 30th, 2018. Should you have questions, please contact the conference organizing committee at: [email protected]. Detailed information about the conference venue, hotel accommodations, and conference program activities will be made available on the SLACA website.

 

Conference Fees

  • $80  Members from the United States, Canada, and Europe
  • $50  Members from Latin America
  • $30  Students

 

Conference Format

We are limiting the number of papers to no more than 40 in order to assure that there are no concurrent sessions on the conference theme. Posters and papers can be written in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and English. However, because the meetings are in a Spanish-speaking locale, presentations in Spanish will reach more people and are encouraged.

 

Important dates and deadlines

  • November 30, 2018        Deadline for submission of abstracts
  • January 14, 2019            Confirmation of acceptance
  • February 1, 2019            Confirmation of participation
  • April 11-13, 2019            Conference in Santo Domingo, D.R.

 

Selection procedure

The Conference Committee will select 30-40 papers to be presented at the conference’s thematic sessions on April -11-13, 2019. To ensure one’s participation, the committee must receive confirmation of participation no later than February 1, 2019. Participation is contingent on confirmation.

 

Conference Organizing Committee

  • Ricardo Pérez, SLACA Councilor (Bi-Annual Meeting Chair, 2015-18)
  • Iván Sandoval Cervantes, SLACA Councilor (Bi-Annual Meeting Chair, 2018-21)
  • Ronda Brulotte, SLACA President
  • Luisa Rollins Castillo, SLACA Councilor
  • Joseph Feldman, SLACA Member
Dec
1
Sat
CFP: Sinophone Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Critical Reflections
Dec 1 all-day

Call for Papers: Sinophone Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Critical Reflections

April 12-13, 2019

University of California, Los Angeles
Organized by Professor Shu-mei Shih (UCLA)
Deadline: December 1, 2018

Website: http://international.ucla.edu/apc/article/197181

 

Since the initial conceptualization of Sinophone studies over a decade ago as a field that examines Sinitic-language cultures and communities marked by difference and heterogeneity around the world, scholarly work in the field has become more and more interdisciplinary, involving not only literary and cinema studies, but also history, anthropology, musicology, linguistics, art history, dance, and others. Now we routinely see “Sinophone” as a specific marker with multiple implications that are no longer merely denotative, enabling, on the one hand, marginalized voices, sites, and practices to come into view, and, on the other hand, an expanded conversation with such fields as postcolonial studies, settler colonial studies, immigration studies, ethnic studies, queer studies, and area studies. There have been vibrant debates at the definitional and conceptual level about critical issues and standpoints, such as the pros and cons of the diasporic framework (diaspora as history versus diaspora as value), the difficulty of overcoming Chineseness, the strength and pitfalls of language-determined identities, imperial and anti-imperial politics, racialization and self-determination of minority peoples, place-based cultural practices, the dialectics between roots and routes, and many others, and presently, scholars in disciplines other than literary and cinema studies have begun to join these conversations. The increasingly interdisciplinary nature of Sinophone studies compels us to take stock, at this particular historical conjuncture, of where this inherently interdisciplinary field has been, where it is going, and where it might go in the future.

The conference calls for paper proposals that engage with the broad contours of Sinophone studies as described above with the aim of gathering selected conference papers into a new reader entitled Sinophone Studies: An Interdisciplinary Reader, after the 2013 volume, Sinophone Studies: A Critical Reader (Columbia UP). The 2013 volume was largely limited to literary and cultural studies, and the current volume in preparation will give preference to disciplines that are not yet represented in the 2013 volume as well as more conceptual and theoretical essays that elaborate upon Sinophone studies as an interdisciplinary field and the ways in which Sinophone studies has reframed existing discussions and challenged specific centrisms and boundaries.

Please send your paper proposal of no more than 300 words to Kunxian Shen at [email protected] by December 1, 2018. Notifications of proposal acceptance will be sent by December 15 to allow presenters time to apply for travel funding. Full papers are expected for delivery at the conference. The conference organizers will provide lodging, refreshments, and some meals, but will not be able to cover travel expenses. Conference registration is free.

Dec
4
Tue
AAS2018: Life in an Age of Death
Dec 4 – Dec 7 all-day

AAS2018: LIFE IN AN AGE OF DEATH

4-7 December, 2018

James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia

During the first decades of the twenty-first century, the proliferation of life as a generative possibility has become marked by the spectre of death, closure, denial and ends. Ours is an era of precarity, extinction, militarised inequality, a seemingly boundless war on terror, the waning legitimacy of human rights, a rising consciousness of animal cruelty and consumer complicity in killing and suffering, and the global closure of decolonial and socialist windows of emancipation. Artificial intelligence and post-human technology-flesh interventions have become sources of existential threat to be secured against, rather than means of freeing, or otherwise expanding life. Mbembe (2003) first developed the notion of necropolitics in relation to ‘assemblages of death’, zones where technology, economy and social structures bind together to reproduce patterns of extreme violence. Following Foucault, he envisaged a distribution of the world into life zones and death zones. While we can readily identify zones of life and death on these terms, the imaginaries of death have increasingly colonised life zones.

This conference seeks to embrace this moment in history in all its roiling complexity, challenge, and specificity. It asks what accounts for this current interest in the spectre of Death in the anthropological imagination? What sorts of life—social, cultural, technological, creative—emerge in spaces pregnant with death and other life-ending spectres? What new horizons of fear, hope and possibility emerge? What kinds of new social formations, subjectivities and cultural imaginaries?

What social and cultural forms might an affirmative biopolitics, where the power of life is regained from the spectre of death, take? What new strategies of engagement, activism and refusal?

What can anthropology specifically bring to these emergent and often-interdisciplinary zones of urgency? How might our methods, theories and orientations be re-tooled and re-energised for these shadowed times?

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Refugee camp life, detention centres, border zones
  • New interspecies alliances
  • Securitisation of the internet of things
  • Agriculture and food in relation to animal cruelty and environmental degradation
  • Militarisation of urban space and zones of expulsion
  • Affective ecologies
  • Terms of the biopolitical across species, taxa
  • Aging populations
  • Securitising life, normalised insecurity
  • The medical body and social body technologies
  • Death of the fight for the internet
  • Reimagining the museum
  • Mediated death and the digital
  • Indigenous deathscapes
  • Posthuman experiments in and experiences of technology in the flesh
  • Autonomous systems
  • Memory, affect and imaginaries of life
  • Affirmative and critical biopolitics

For further information please see:

https://www.aasconf.org/2018/call-for-panels

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Panels and roundtables: 5 April to 7 May
Call for Papers, Labs: 21 May to 22 June
Early Bird registration opens: 10 August
Standard registration opens: 29 September

InterAsian Connections VI: Hanoi
Dec 4 – Dec 7 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS
InterAsian Connections VI: Hanoi
December 4–7, 2018
Hosted by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences
DEADLINE: February 28, 2018

 

Organizers: Social Science Research Council InterAsia Program, Duke University Global Asia Initiative, Göttingen University Global and Transregional Studies Platform, the Hong Kong Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Hong Kong, Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore, Seoul National University Asia Center, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences, and Yale University.

We are pleased to announce an open call for papers from researchers in any world region who wish to participate in one of the eight thematic workshops at InterAsian Connections VI: Hanoi, the sixth in this international conference series.

The conference, to be held in Hanoi, Vietnam, and hosted by the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences, will include concurrent workshops coordinated by individual directors and showcasing innovative research from across the social sciences and related disciplines. Workshops will focus on themes of particular relevance to Asia, reconceptualized as a dynamic and interconnected historical, geographical, and cultural formation stretching from West Asia through Eurasia and South Asia and Southeast Asia to East Asia.

The conference structure and schedule have been designed to enable intensive working group interactions on a specific research theme, as well as broader interactions on topics of mutual interest and concern. Accordingly, there will be public sessions open to the full group of conference participants and additional scholars as well as closed workshop sessions.

Paper submissions are invited from junior and senior scholars, whether graduate students, faculty, or researchers in NGOs or other research organizations, for the following eight workshops:

  • Beyond the New Media: Deep Time of Networks and Infrastructural Memory in Asia
    • Workshop Directors: Xiao LIU (East Asian Studies, McGill University) and Shuang SHEN (Comparative Literature and Asian Studies, Pennsylvania State University)
  • China’s OBOR Initiative and Its Impacts for Asian Countries
    • Workshop Directors: Anh Nguyen DANG (Director, Institute of Sociology and Vice President, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences)
  • Divine/Transcendent Rulers of Imagined Communities: The Rise and Fall of Royal Nationhood in Asia
    • Workshop Directors: Wasana WONGSURAWAT (History, Chulalongkorn University) and Michael K. CONNORS (School of Politics, History, and International Relations, University of Nottingham, Malaysia Campus)
  • Eurasia’s Islamic Socialist Ecumene
    • Workshop Directors: Eren TASAR (History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) and Mustafa TUNA (Slavic & Eurasian Studies, Duke University)
  • Sacred Forests and Political Ecology: Cosmological Properties and Environmentality
    • Workshop Directors: Bixia CHEN (Agricultural Science, University of the Ryukyus) and Christopher COGGINS (Geography and Asian Studies, Bard College at Simon’s Rock)
  • Sport Mega-Events as Hubs for InterAsian Interactions
    • Workshop Directors: Susan BROWNELL (Anthropology, University of Missouri-St. Louis) and Gwang OK (Physical Education, Chungbuk National University)
  • States of Fortification: Connecting Asia through Technologies of Food and Health
    • Workshop Directors: Melissa L. CALDWELL (Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz) and Izumi NAKAYAMA (The University of Hong Kong)
  • The Netware of the New Asian Economy under the Industrial Revolution 4.0
    • Workshop Directors: Salvatore BABONES (Sociology, University of Sydney) and Vinh Duc NGUYEN (Institute of Sociology, Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences)

Detailed abstracts for the individual workshops, information on the application process, the required application materials, answers to frequently asked questions, and details on funding can be found on our website.

Please note that an individual cannot apply to more than one workshop.

Application materials are due by February 28, 2018. Selection decisions will be announced in April 2018. Accepted participants are required to submit a draft research paper in July 2018, and a final paper in November 2018.

Questions? Contact: [email protected]

Dec
31
Mon
Call for Papers: Rurality and Future-Making
Dec 31 all-day

Rurality and Future-Making: Comparative Perspectives from Europe, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean 
May 24–25, 2019
NSG, University of Cologne (organized jointly by the following Regional Working Groups of the German Anthropological Association (GAA) – RG Europe, RG Middle East and RG Mediterranean)

 

 

Submission Deadline: 31.12.2018 

The conference language will be English.

If you are interested to present a paper, please send an Abstract (200-300 words) to [email protected] by December 31, 2018.

We are planning to publish the proceedings of the conference in an edited volume.

 

To facilitate the process, please adhere to the following deadlines:

  • Dec 31st, 2018 – deadline for the submission of abstracts (200-300 words)
  • Jan 31st, 2019 – notification of acceptance
  • May 22-24th, 2019 – Conference
  • Oct 31st, 2019 – deadline for the submission of papers (10.000-12.000 words)

 

Conveners:

  • GAA Regional Working Group Europe:
  • Jelena Tošić (St. Gallen/Vienna), Andreas Streinzer (Frankfurt/Vienna) GAA Regional Working Group Middle East:
  • Katharina Lange (Berlin)
  • GAA Regional Working Group Mediterranean:
  • Michaela Schäuble (Bern), Martin Zillinger (Cologne)
  • Organizers: Simon Holdermann (Cologne), Christoph Lange (Cologne)

Contact: [email protected]

 

This conference brings together three GAA regional working groups – Anthropology of Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean – to explore rurality as a reserve and resource for future-making in their interconnected and transnational regionalities. It invites participants to explore situated practices of future-making in order to trace how rurality is achieved, marked and (de-)stabilized in different places. Through concrete ethnographic case studies, we aim at conceptualizing the ‘rural’ beyond wellknown center-periphery dichotomies. Well aware that ‘the rural’ and ‘the urban’ can only be “understood as a continuum irreducible to the polarity of one or the other term” (Chio 2017:362); we use the rural lens to create an anthropological laboratory (Albera 1999) which enables us to “write against established categories” (Horden 2014:9). This conference invites researchers to reflect on the various perpetuated methodological urbanisms, ruralisms and regionalisms, i.e. the persisting preoccupation of ethnographers with urban spaces and research in geographically and/ or politically bounded categories like Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Most of these categories contribute to the construction of our methodological iron cage as Wimmer and Glick-Schiller pointed out in the term methodological nationalism (2002:302). With the focus on rurality as an anthropological laboratory and lens, we aim to challenge earlier essentialist approaches and at the same time emphasize its contradictory and thus productive potential.

While overall, the rural population may be on the decline, it may well increase in absolute numbers in specific places. And while rural population may predominantly rely on agriculture for a living, in various regions its share of GDP is diminishing. Poverty remains particularly pronounced in rural regions. In North Africa, this becomes evident in the inadequate access to education, health services, electricity or clean water (Barnes 2014). Moreover, the demographic exodus out of vast rural areas in parts of Southern Europe challenges not only individual but also communal lives as well as national political agendas. Nevertheless, grand visions of future-making by politicians and entrepreneurs remain geared towards rural regions – whether it be in terms of large-scale agricultural projects for the continuous fragile and fragmented landscapes of the Mediterranean, irrigation and electrification schemes for the exploitation of its natural resources, or in the form of touristic development agencies for purported isolated areas. Also, in various countries along the Mediterranean shorelines, governments continue to rely on networks and patronage systems in the rural hinterlands as its basis of power.

But rurality is not only played out as a resource for large scale politics of modernization, it can also be used as a socio-ecological reserve that people maintain to diversify their opportunities and resources in times of crises. Large-scale modernization schemes and their risks are thus mitigated by individual strategies to provide for alternative options and material foundations in case of failure. One de-centered perspective on rurality is Hauschild’s emphasis on the rural hinterland as material and political reserve which encompasses various available resources to ensure, expand and delimit agency (Hauschild 2008:217f.).

For a long time, Eastern and Southern Europe, the Mediterranean as well as the Middle East have been approached by their presupposed outstanding rural character in anthropological inquiry; like the notorious ‘honor-and-shame’ complex, ‘the rural’ can be seen as a “gatekeeping concept” for anthropologists who had been working in these areas (Appadurai 1986:357). This is apparently present in classical anthropological studies on ‘Mediterranean countrymen’ (Pitt-Rivers 1963, Davis 1977) as well as in the rich corpus of peasant studies from Southern Europe to the Middle East – a body of research and literature that has provided essential impulses in the formation of anthropological theory.

Arguably, anthropological research in recent decades has shifted away from the countryside to the metropoles, predominately exploring the rural through the lens of the urban, bureaucratic elites, cultural entrepreneurs and tourists’ promises (Deeb/Winnegar 2012:539). Against this background we want to promote a symmetrical anthropology of the rural, which opens up new perspectives for research.

Finally, we invite scholars to expand and multiply Horden and Purcell’s (2000) perspective on the Mediterranean to Europe as a whole and the Middle East. Their emphasis on the ruptures and connectivities of “human micro-ecologies” (Horden 2012: 28) pervading the karst landscapes of the Mediterranean and encompassing Southern Europe, parts of the Middle East and North Africa, can help us comparatively zoom in on webs of microregions in which rurality takes on different forms and meaning and is played out differently at different locales.

Research topics and questions for the conference may entail:

  • How and for whom does the rural/hinterland/landscape figure to be a meaningful space of social relations and livelihoods?
  • The ‘rural’ as backdrop for processes of globalization or the recursive rural impact on globalization
  • What are spatial and power implications of the Mediterranean as an imaginary category?
  • What are the perceptions of “rural Europe” and what kind of histories and future-making imaginaries do they imply?
  • The ‘mediatized Mediterranean’: rurality, infrastructures and media
  • How can we conceptualize local/global, rural/urban and periphery/center binaries in a more productive way?
  • The ‘rural’ in development practice and discourse and in changing modernization narratives
  • Migration and other rural (im-)mobilities?
  • Rurality, Scale and Migration
  • Rethinking the ‘rural’ with reference to Horden/Purcell’s historical ecology and its defining features of rupture and connectivity
  • The ‘rural’ as cultural identity and heritage – the entrepreneurial potential and imaginary for ‘the touristic gaze’

References:

Albera, Dionigi (1999): The Mediterranean as an anthropological laboratory, Anales de la Fundacion Joaquín Costa 16, 215-232.

Appadurai, Arjun (1986): Theory in Anthropology: Center and Periphery, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 28(2), 56-361.

Barnes, Jessica (2014): Cultivating the Nile The Everyday Politics of Water in Egypt. Durham: Duke University Press.

Chio, Jenny (2017): “Introduction: Rural as space and sociality.” Critique of Anthropology 37 (4):361-363.

Hauschild, Thomas (2008): Ritual und Gewalt: Ethnologische Studien an europäischen und mediterranen Gesellschaften. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Horden, P. (2014): Introduction. A companion to Mediterranean history. P. Horden and S. Kinoshita.

Chichester, Wiley-Blackwell: 1-6.

Horden, P. (2012): Situations Both Alike? Connectivity, the Mediterranean, the Sahara. Saharan frontiers space and mobility in Northwest Africa. J. McDougall and J. Scheele. Bloomington, Indiana University Press: 25-38.

Horden, Peregrine and Purcell, Nicholas (2000): The Corrupting Sea: A Study of Mediterranean history. Oxford: Blackwell.

Deeb, Lara and Winegar, Jessica (2012): Anthropologies of Arab-Majority Societies, Annual Review of Anthropology, (41), 537-58.

Davis, John (1977): People of the Mediterranean: An Essay in Comparative Social Anthropology Pitt-Rivers, Julian (1968): Mediterranean countrymen: Essays in the Social Anthropology of the Mediterranean, Paris: Mouton.

Wimmer, Andreas, and Nina Glick Schiller (2002): “Methodological nationalism and beyond: nation– state building, migration and the social sciences.” Global Networks 2 (4):301-334.

Jan
4
Fri
CHRÓNOS: an International Multi-Disciplinary Percussion Symposium
Jan 4 all-day

CHRÓNOS is an International Multi-Disciplinary Percussion Symposium bringing together scholars, performers, pedagogues, and health and wellness professionals in an inclusive environment aimed at delving à l’intérieur of percussion studies and percussive processes.

 

Organization: University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Location: School of Music, Brownsville, TX
Dates: April 4 & 5, 2019
Abstract Deadline: January 4, 2019

 

Call for Presentations

UTRGV School of Music invites abstracts for its international, multi-disciplinary percussion symposium with keynote address by Dr. John Parks IV. We invite proposals for paper presentations, interactive sessions, or posters/exhibits addressing the following theme and perspectives:

 

The Art of Noise

In antiquity, life was nothing but silence. Noise was really not born before the 19th century. With the advent of machinery, noise reigns supreme over human sensibility. —Luigi Russolo (1913)

Reflective: “Primitive people attributed to sound a divine origin. It became surrounded with religious respect, and reserved for the priests, who thereby enriched their rites with a new mystery.”

Current: “To excite our sensibility, music has developed into a search for a more complex polyphony and a greater variety of instrumental tones and coloring. It has tried to obtain the most complex succession of dissonant chords, thus preparing the ground for musical noise.

Forward: “We must break at all cost from this restrictive circle of pure sounds and conquer the infinite variety of noise-sounds.”

 

Submission Guidelines

Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to [email protected] by January 4. The abstract should include title of the paper, name of the author, institutional affiliation, short bio, and any A/V requirements. Invitations to present will be sent via email by January 21, 2019.

 

Webpage: https://webapps.utrgv.edu/it/em/index.cfm?event=Public.View.Courses&Event_id=1262

Jan
31
Thu
Call for Contributors: What Anthropologists Do, Veronica Strang (2nd edition)
Jan 31 all-day

Dear Fellow Anthropologists,

We are in the process of updating an introductory ‘primer’ in Applied Anthropology, entitled What Anthropologists Do, which was initially published in 2009.

The intention was originally to introduce the subject to school leavers or first year undergraduates, who often have little idea about what anthropology is, or what anthropologists do. The purpose of this second edition remains primarily to encourage people to study anthropology and also to illustrate the wide variety of careers now available to anthropologists. The book has also become widely used in undergraduate anthropology courses, to help people think about the areas they want to focus on as they progress.

The text has a secondary purpose: many potential employers of anthropologists – industries, agencies and government organisations – also have little familiarity with anthropology as a discipline, and thus only rarely make use of anthropologists and their particular skills. By providing them with a highly accessible and updated introduction to the subject, the volume will – it is hoped – encourage greater use of anthropology and the potential insights provided by ethnographic research.

What we are looking for this time are exciting new examples of research and short autobiographical accounts describing people’s experiences in applying anthropology, especially in emergent areas.

If you would like to be involved in helping to get our discipline ‘out there’, please have a look at these new areas (below). Depending on your level of enthusiasm and ability to spend some time on this, you could send some brief examples of your current research and how you have applied anthropology. How did you get involved, and what difference has the inclusion of anthropology made in your work? (If I quote you or make broader use of your comments, this will be acknowledged.) 

And/or you could offer a short autobiographical account (1000-2000 words) of your work as an applied anthropologist, possibly including some feedback about it from the people with whom you have worked. If you think you might like to do this, please write a brief outline (about 200 words), and attach a CV as well as your contact details.

We do hope that you will support this continuing effort to encourage wider engagement with our discipline. So if you are doing some good things with anthropology, please let us know, sending responses to either [email protected] or [email protected].

Initial drafts/suggestions should be submitted by the end of September, so that we can spend October reviewing possible items to include. The deadline for the inclusion of final drafts for approved content is January 31st, 2019.

Many thanks,

Veronica Strang and Joanna Puckering

 

Summary of new areas, update for 2nd edition.

Introduction

A more substantial body of literature to mention, including basic introductions to anthropology and to professional practice.

Chapter 1. Anthropology and Advocacy

Debates on GM and related issues – new issues such as:

Neonicotinoids

Fracking

Biofuels etc.

Indigenous rights and mining issues, eg. Standing Rock

Debates about ecological justice/rights for nature

Efforts to declare rivers as ‘living ancestors’ and ‘legal persons’

Advocacy more directly in relation to non-human rights and conservation

Human rights:

More focus on displacement

Treatment of refugees

Human trafficking

Modern slavery

Rights to clean water

Rights to sanitation

Freshwater resources

Water security

Chapter 2. Anthropology and Aid

General updating with ongoing research on (and critiques of) international aid development

Medical humanitarianism

More on involvement of anthropologists in participatory action research

Material about gypsies could be updated

Chapter 3. Anthropology and Development

Ecotourism

Emergent conflicts around tourism taking over cities (eg. Barcelona, Lisbon)

Displacement of local residents in favour of profitable Air B&B accommodation etc.

Dams continue to be controversial

Diversion of limited freshwater resources into irrigation

Chapter 4. Anthropology and the Environment

Impacts of the patterns of freshwater use (and see Ch3)

Plastics in the ocean

Tipping points in extinctions

Air quality issues

Energy production/consumption

Fisheries policy (and Brexit)

Conservation controversies over big cat protection

Updates to climate change debates / anthropological perspectives

Archaeology and historical archaeology

Heritage:

 – Recent controversies over Stonehenge tunnel would update that material

 – Lighthouses and heritage

 – Land and identity

 – Strengthen the material on urban identities

Chapter 5. Anthropology and Governance

Recent rise in populism, Brexit etc.

Rising influence of social media

Anthropology’s involvement in public policy development

Changes in managerial cultures

Corporatisation of health and education institutions (schools and universities)

Continued rise of transnational corporations; their ownership of key resources and utilities

Involvement of anthropology in military and covert government activities

Chapter 6. Anthropology, Business and Industry

Business and digital developments:

 – Advertising etc. via Facebook (and related controversies)

 – Virtual realities/cyberspace

 – Online gaming

 – Employment of anthropologists by Google, Microsoft etc

Anthropologists working with unions/on industrial action

New methods such as UX (user experience) testing

Professional behaviour

Gender relations

Gender pay gap

Chapter 7.  Anthropology and Health

Sex/reproduction/technologies

Changes in the last decade, eg. issues:

 – Surrogacy

 – Sperm donation

 – Abortion

 – Child rearing

Emergent issues about millennials and health

Changes in approaches to mental health

Huge issues (especially in the UK) about the demographics of aging, dementia etc.

Related concerns around health provision:

 – NHS

 – Health insurance in the US etc.

Major new outbreaks of disease, eg. Ebola (importance of anthropological understandings)

Forensic anthropology – continues to expand, especially in relation to disaster zones

Chapter 8. Anthropology, Art and Identity

 Standalone ‘identity’ related topics

 Those expressed via art and material culture

The former:

New work dealing with gender and sexuality, eg.

 – Same sex marriage

 – Transgender issues

 – Adoption etc.

Discussions about race:

 – Re-emergence of the extreme right wing and its effects

Breakdown of federal states, eg. Scotland and Catalonia, efforts to achieve independence and outcomes to date

Visual anthropology and representation:

 – Museums

 – Cultural heritage

 – Archaeology and historical archaeology

Development and (both tangible and intangible) cultural heritage

Visual anthropology and social intervention

Chapter 9. Interdisciplinary Anthropology (New chapter)

Situations in which interdisciplinary research involves (and is assisted by the involvement of) anthropology

Issues around how anthropology is applied

The need to provide students with practical training in engaging with other disciplines

The perspectives of non-academic professionals, industry specialists etc.

Engaging with alternate forms of expertise involves:

 – seeking shared research questions

 – common theoretical framework

 – navigating sometimes difficult issues, eg. disciplinary identity, territoriality, power, access to funding, disciplinary status

Conclusion

Additional section providing a vision of where anthropology is heading in the future.

 

Feb
15
Fri
25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

Mar
1
Fri
Call for Papers: Place Branding and Consumption of Heritage
Mar 1 all-day

Special Issue “Place Branding and the Consumption of Heritage”

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section “Sustainability of Culture and Heritage“.

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2019

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050) calls for original research on the synergisms between the geographic attributes of place (regions, countries, cities, towns and landscapes) and how consumption —through tourism or via consumer goods and services—creates a special niche in regional and global economies. While globalization aims to homogenize consumer tastes and preferences, public and private stakeholders increasingly draw on folklore, culture, history, and the tangential attributes of landscape to add value to consumer and tourist experiences. Together, these synergisms portend a sustainable approach to improving the human condition in an increasingly borderless and limitless realm of consumption and tourist experiences. This process, however, is fraught with tension as different narratives about authenticity and heritage emerge. Accordingly, we seek contributions from across the social sciences and business fields that use both case-study and empirically-anchored perspectives, as well as approaches at broader, theoretical and meta-analytical levels, to explore these aspects of place-branding.

Topics might range from the rise of agricultural tourism (wine-circuits and viticulture, specialty produce), micro-breweries, social justice museums (the American south, Eastern Europe), and the burgeoning literature on “Made in [fill in the country],” to ways in which local, regional, and national products enlist color, music, story-telling, cultural icons, and myth-making to couple consumption or tourism-marketing strategies with place attributes.

The Guest Editor guarantees a timely yet thorough review and turnaround of all submissions. Sustainability, whose Impact Factor this fifth year of open-access publication is 2.075, is an international, scholarly journal whose peer-reviewed papers highlight the  environmental, cultural, economic, and social sustainability of human beings. It is indexed by SCIE, SSCI, and other databases.

If you have interest in this special topic issue, please provide a 150-word abstract first before formal submission. Looking forward to your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Joseph L. Scarpaci
Guest Editor

References

  • Arnould, E. J., & Thompson, C. J. (2005). Consumer culture theory (CCT): Twenty years of research. Journal of consumer research31(4), 868-882.
  • Ashworth, G., & Larkham, P. (2013). Building a new heritage (RLE Tourism). Routledge.
  • Dinnie, K. (2015). Nation branding: Concepts, issues, practice. Routledge.
  • Fehimović, D. & Ogden, R. (Eds.) (2017) Branding Latin America: Strategies, aims, resistance. Lexington Books.
  • Graham, B. J., & Howard, P. (Eds.). (2008). The Ashgate research companion to heritage and identity. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • Graham, B., Ashworth, G., & Tunbridge, J. (2016). A geography of heritage: Power, culture and economy. Routledge.
  • Holt, D.B. (2004). How brands become icons: Principles of cultural branding. Harvard Business School.
  • Manning, P. & Ulisashvili, A. 2008. “Our Beer”: Ethnographic brands in postsocialist Georgia. American Anthropologist 109 (4): 626-641.
  • Morales, E. & Scapraci, J.L. (2012). Marketing without advertising: Brand preference and consumer choice in Cuba. Routledge
  • Park, H.Y. (2014). Heritage tourism. Routledge.
  • Pettygrove, M., & Ghose, R. (2018). From “rust belt” to “fresh coast”: Remaking the city through food justice and urban agriculture. Annals of the American Association of Geographers108(2), 591-603.
  • Pike, A. (2009). Geographies of brands and branding.  Progress in Human Geography, 33(5):  619-645.
  • Rivera, L. A. (2008). Managing “Spoiled” national identity: War, tourism, and memory in Croatia. American Sociological Review 73(4): 613-634.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2005), Plazas and barrios: Heritage tourism and globalization in the Latin American centro histórico. University of Arizona Press.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2007). Globalization tourists and heritage tourists in American culture: The case of Latin American historic districts. Material Culture 39 (2): 1-16.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2016). The meaning of objects. Material Culture 48:1-9.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Coupey, E. & Reed, S. 2018. Artists as cultural icons:  The icon myth transfer effect as a heuristic for cultural branding. Journal of Product & Brand Management. 27(3): 320-333.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Portela, A.H. (2009). Cuban landscapes: History, memory and place. Guilford.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Sovacool, B.J., and Ballantyne, R. (2016). A critical review of the costs of advertising: A transformative consumer research perspective. Journal of Consumer Policy 39 (2): 1-22.
  • Schor, J.B. & Holt, D.B. (2000) The consumer society reader. The New Press.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • place branding
  • heritage
  • consumer goods
  • tourism
  • cultural geography/cultural anthropology

Published Papers
This special issue is now open for submission.

Mar
15
Fri
The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019
Mar 15 all-day

The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019

Bounded languages, Unbounded

The politics of identity remain central to the mediation of language change. Here, boundaries rise and fall, thus motivating the ephemeral nature of community. The Mediterranean region is one replete with histories and power struggles, clearly demarcating nation, community, and ethnicity. Identities, language ideologies, and the languages themselves, have sought boundedness, dynamics which have indeed sought change over eons, through demographic and geographic movements, through geopolitics, through technological innovation. In a current era of technological advancement, transnational fluidity, intellectual power, capitalism, and new sexualities, we question, once again, the boundedness of language and identity, and ways in which to unbound languages and ideologies. However, mroe than before, we now increasingly require anthropological toil, so to innovative ways to locate these ideologies and their fluid boundaries, actively. We now then need to unbound these languages, and their ideologies, so to arrive at progressive realizations, and to rectify, or at least see past, the segregations of old.

The theme for the COMELA 2019,

Bounded languages, Unbounded

encapsulates an ongoing struggle throughout Mediterranean regions. The continuous tension between demarcation, yet concurrent legitimization, of languages, language ideologies, and language identities, has now entered an era where new modes of interactivity require language communities to take on roles superordinate to the past, and where flexible citizenship now operates within, and not only across, language communities.

For more information about the CFP, please visit the website.

 

Abstract and poster proposal submission

Opens: August 13, 2018 at midnight (CET Time)
Closes: January 25, 2019 at midnight (CET Time)