Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Aug
30
Fri
The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020
Aug 30 all-day

The CALA 2020 – The (Annual) Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia, February 5 – 8, 2020

http://cala2020.upm.edu.my

Information

Following the success of the CALA 2019, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2019, in Cambodia, we announce The CALA 2020, February 5-8, 2020, at The University Putra Malaysia, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia.

 

The CALA seeks to redefine scholarship on Asian Language and Society.

Purpose and Structure

The CALA 2020 invites Linguists, Anthropologists, Linguistic and Cultural Anthropologists, Culturologists, Sociologists, Political Scientists, Ethnologists, and those in related fields pertinent to Asia, to discuss work, and engage in scholarly collaborations, thus forming global networks.

Location

University Putra Malaysia

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Partners

  • Taylor and Francis Global Publishers (Official Publishing Partner)
  • 60 major academic institutions globally
  • Scientific Committee of over 100 academics

Publications

Journal Special Issues, and Monographs, from papers submitted that meet publication requirements. Papers selected will be published with Top-Tier journals. Here, ample assistance will be provided to revise manuscripts.

Dates

Abstract and poster proposal submission – November 17, 2018 – May 9, 2019

Notification of acceptance – No later than May 10 2018 (for those submitted prior to this)

Registration

Early bird – March 10, 2019 – June 14, 2019

Normal bird – June 15, 2019 – September 25, 2019

Presenters must register by September 25, 2019, to guarantee a place in the program. Registration will remain open after this, but conference organizers cannot guarantee placement in the conference.

Late bird – September 26, 2019 – February 8, 2020 (Conference end)

Conference dates

Wednesday February 5, 2020 – Saturday February 8, 2020

Final day comprises optional Anthropological excursion (separate cost)

Abstract submissions

The Call for Abstracts is now open, at http://cala2020.upm.edu.my, which contains all information

Anthropological Excursion

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Theme

Asian Text, Global Context

The CALA 2020, February 5-8, 2020, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia, will follow on from the success of the CALA 2019, in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The CALA 2020 will thus expand on work on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, as well as Asian Language and Society. Here, the global Linguistic Anthropologists will gather to discuss work on Linguistics, Anthropology, and Language and Society, in and of Asia, and beyond.

With an increased focus on the significance of Asian Language and society, the Annual CALA Conference has emerged at an appropriate time, opportuning academics from the West to tap into, and work with, Academia in the East. Scholars in institutions throughout Asia increasingly affiliate with the CALA network, as do those in Western contexts, to explore the vast possibilities of the Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, academically, and socioculturally, where the CALA network has now well contributed and has significantly boosted research, publications, and academic networks, globally.

Themed Asian Text, Global Context, The CALA 2020 will represent over 400 years of East-West global interaction, communication, and transnationalism. Throughout, symbolisms of Asian ‘texts’ have been significantly emphasized, (re)interpreted, contested, and distorted, while employed for cultural and political purpose. Asian texts have become highly representational, authenticating and legitimizing sociopolitical and cultural devices, where their potency should not be undervalued. Never have these texts shown more significance than in the present, as their intensified use, and their qualities in Asian identities long contested, seek this Linguistic Anthropological exploration.

The Asian text has thus regenerated itself as a semiotic, in that, as a verbal, non-verbal, and visual artifact, it encompasses the whole semiotic spectrum of that which is performatively Asian, and that which is distinct from the Non-Asian, yet a text which can interlink the East and the West, through a multitude of textual modes. The continuous recentralizations and recontextualizations of Asian texts, both locally and globally, have hence become vital to representations of Asia, Linguistically, Anthropologically, Socioculturally, Politically, and much more.

The CALA 2020 thus calls for renewed interpretations of Asian texts, and asks that we seek new perspectives of these complex texts, in global contexts. These interpretations increase in significance as; return migration to Asia is now a salient factor in transnational flows; online texts and their textual modes now compete ever more enthusiastically to effect disjunctures in previously Western dominated technologies; ontological conceptions of life and social interaction now increasingly draw from Asian philosophies, sociocultural models, lifeworlds, and Asian urban anthropologies, thus producing interstices for new or revised textual and textualized semiotics; the entangled complexities and intersubjectivities of political, sociocultural, and religious practices and their constraints, motivate engagements in interfaith dialogue, shifting ethnic demarcations, and sociopolitical interventions. Ultimately, the massive sets of Eastern demographics, and their expansive sets of social dynamics, models, and praxes, continue to uniquely inform and (re)complexify productions of Asian texts, in both local and in global contexts.

Strands

Abstract and poster proposals should address one or more of the key strands related to Asian countries and regions:

  • Anthropological Linguistics
  • Applied Sociolinguistics
  • Buddhist studies and discourses
  • Cognitive Anthropology and Language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Ethnographical Language Work
  • Ethnography of Communication
  • General Sociolinguistics
  • Islamic Studies and discourses
  • Language, Community, Ethnicity
  • Language Contact and Change
  • Language, Dialect, Sociolect, Genre
  • Language Documentation
  • Language, Gender, Sexuality
  • Language Ideologies
  • Language Minorities and Majorities
  • Language Revitalization
  • Language in Real and Virtual Spaces
  • Language Socialization
  • Language and Spatiotemporal Frames
  • Multifunctionality
  • Narrative and Metanarrative
  • Nonverbal Semiotics
  • Poetics
  • Post-Structuralism and Language
  • Semiotics and Semiology
  • Social Psychology of Language
  • Textualization, Contextualization, Entextualization

Presentation lengths

  • Colloquia – 1.5 hours with 3-5 contributors (Parts A and B are possible, thus 6-10 contributors)
  • General paper sessions – Approx. 20-25 minutes each, including 5 mins for questions/responses
  • Posters – to be displayed at designated times throughout the CALA 2020

Submission Guidelines (via the online submission website, or by email (see below))

General session papers

  • 18-word maximum presentation title
  • 400-word maximum abstract, including references

Colloquia

  • Submission of only the main abstract for colloquium required
  • Abstract must contain the colloquium main description, and a summary of each individual paper within the colloquium

Evaluation of proposals

All abstracts for general sessions will be double blind reviewed.

Main parent abstracts for colloquia will be double blind reviewed. All abstracts for individual presentations within each colloquia will not be peer reviewed, but are expected to be at a standard commensurate to the colloquium parent abstract.

Review criteria are as follows:

  • Appropriateness and significance to CALA themes
  • Originality/significance/impact of the research
  • Clarity/coherence of research concerns
  • Theoretical and analytical framework(s)
  • Description of research, data collection, findings/conclusions, rhetoric, and exegesis as a whole
  • For colloquia, importance/significance of the overarching topic and/or framework(s) addressed, and its coherence of and with individual presentations.

For more information, please contact:

Chair

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Hazlina Abdul Halim

Head, Dept. of Foreign Languages

Faculty of Modern Languages & Communication

Universiti Putra Malaysia

[email protected]

Head of Communications

Ms. Nhan Huynh

[email protected]

http://cala2020.upm.edu.my

Sep
1
Sun
2019 Praxis Award Competition
Sep 1 all-day

Recognizing Excellence in Practitioner Anthropology

THE 2019 PRAXIS AWARD COMPETITION

Since 1981, the Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists’ (WAPA) biennial Praxis Award competition has recognized outstanding achievement in translating anthropological knowledge into action as reflected in a single project or specific endeavor. Ideal award candidates are anthropologists who can demonstrate the value of anthropological knowledge, theory and methods to solve problems addressed through public and/or private sector efforts (e.g., government, industry, or non-profit).

Award recipients will receive a $1000 prize and will be recognized at a Praxis Award ceremony and reception at the 2020 meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology. For further information, requirements, and a list of past award recipients, please see https://wapadc.org/praxis. A brief pre-application (2 pages) is encouraged. Both the pre-application and full application templates are available on the Praxis Awards Guidelines page.

The competition is open to anyone holding an MA or PhD in any subfield of anthropology. WAPA strongly encourages submissions from individuals, mixed-discipline groups, or organizations where at least one anthropologist worked on and influenced the designated project. Entries are encouraged from anthropologists worldwide. All entries will be evaluated by an expert panel of anthropological practitioners.

Key Dates:

  • Optional pre-application deadline: July 1, 2019
  • Full application deadline: September 1, 2019
  • Awardees and other applicants notified: January 2020
  • Praxis award(s) presented: March 2020

Please direct questions to [email protected], noting Praxis in the subject line. Pre-applications and applications should be submitted to [email protected].

Sep
7
Sat
CFP: South African Society for Critical Theory Conference
Sep 7 all-day

Contested Identities: Critical Conceptualisations of the Human

November 22–23, 2019

 

The South African Society for Critical Theory (SASCT) invites abstract submissions of up to 500 words for its 3rd Annual Conference which will take place at the Howard College Campus of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, from the 22nd to the 23rd of November 2019.

SASCT invites papers which address the vexed notion of the “human” in the contemporary age. As part of such considerations, this conference welcomes papers that consider the possibilities and pitfalls of identity theory in relation to Critical Theory. What analytic and conceptual resources does identity politics offer Critical Theory? What might a critical analysis of identity politics reveal? Do identity politics serve as an instance of a process whereby we come to view our own individuality in terms of pre-constructed cultural categories? What stance should Critical Theory adopt towards identity politics?

This conference also welcomes papers that explore the concept of “the human” and “human nature” from a critical perspective. What, for instance, might we construe as “essential” human characteristics? Is critical reason to be understood as such a characteristic? Is the question of the “human’ even meaningful any longer? Would the attempt to define the “human” in its present historico-social conditions enable us to map its future trajectory? Would the attempt to formulate such a definition facilitate liberation or merely serve a repressive ideological function? If the “human” or “human nature” are no longer meaningful categories, then what is it that Critical Theory aims to liberate? Has the technological mediation of existence altered our understanding of humanity? In short, what is the future of the “human”?

The conference welcomes approaches from all aspects of Critical Theory, broadly construed. In particular, the conference welcomes papers that address issues relating to: African Critical Theory, Digital Culture, the intersections between Critical Theory of European origin (Frankfurt School, Foucault, etc.), Black Existentialism, and Africana Critical Theory as well as contributions on any and all aspects of Critical Theory, e.g. the 3 generations of Frankfurt School Critical Theory, Postcolonial Theory, De-colonial Theory, Critical Feminism, Critical Film Studies, Critical Race Theory, Critical Theory of Technology, Critical Legal Studies, Post-structuralism, Psychoanalysis, Critical Hermeneutics, Liberation Theory, Critical Pedagogy, Critical Theology, Critical Anthropology, etc. 

The Conference organisers would also appreciate papers that address thinkers whose work lies outside the “canon” of Critical Theory, but whose work can extend current research in Critical Theory or whose work in itself embodies alternative forms of Critical Theory. Whilst the organisers encourage contributions that address the conference theme, the theme itself should be viewed as merely suggestive.

Please submit abstracts to [email protected] by the 7th September 2019 Acceptance letters will be sent by the 21st of September at the latest.

Should you have queries regarding any aspect of the conference then please do not hesitate to contact the conference organising committee.

Sep
16
Mon
2020-2021 Fulbright US Scholar Program
Sep 16 all-day

The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is open and accepting applications for academic year 2020-2021!   Whether you plan to conduct independent research, teach students, or pursue a professional project, Fulbright makes a real and lasting impact. Fulbright Scholars return to their home institutions with enhanced career prospects, ideas for future collaborations, and a truly global perspective. Don’t miss out on this important opportunity to share knowledge and serve as a cultural ambassador through Fulbright. The deadline to apply to the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is September 16th, 2019.

 

There are many options for awards focusing on Anthropology and Archaeology including the following:

 

Australia: Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (The Australian National University)

Canada: Research Chairs in Indigenous Studies

Czech Republic: Fulbright-Palacky University Distinguished Chair

Egypt: American University in Cairo

India:  Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award (All Disciplines)

Peru: All Disciplines

Ukraine: Cultural Resource Management

Zambia: Multiple Disciplines – University of Zambia

 

For the full list of related awards, click here.

Join us for a live webinar focused on Fulbright US Scholar Program Opportunities including Anthropology and Archaeology. Register below:

Opportunities for U.S. Fulbright Scholar Applicants in Education and the Social Sciences

May 22, 2019 – 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program Team
Contact: [email protected]

Oct
1
Tue
Claremont Prize for the Study of Religion
Oct 1 all-day

The Claremont Prize for the Study of Religion is dedicated to the publication of first books by early career scholars working in any discipline of the humanities or social sciences. Submissions can be on any aspect of the study of religion, including the study of secularism. Prize-winners will be invited to IRCPL to participate in a workshop and the books will appear in IRCPL’s series, “Religion, Culture, and Public Life,” published by Columbia University Press.

Deadline for applications: October 1, 2019.

Eligibility

The international competition is open to scholars working in the social sciences and humanities. Submissions must meet the following criteria:

  1. Authors must have received the PhD on or after January 1, 2012.
  2. The manuscript must be single-authored.
  3. The submission must be the author’s first book (excluding edited books).
  4. The manuscript must not be under consideration at any other press.


Timeline

October 1, 2019: Deadline for submission
November 2019: Notification by selection committee of short list
November 2019 – February 2020: Short-listed manuscripts peer reviewed by Columbia University Press
March 2020: Prize winners announced by IRCPL
May 2020: Workshop for winning books at Columbia University

Submission Instructions

Applicants should submit the following materials to Marianna Pecoraro at [email protected]. Please merge application form, CV and book précis into one PDF file; the book manuscript should be sent as a separate PDF file. All file names should include the applicant’s last name.

  1. Completed application form (found here).
  2. Brief CV. Maximum 2 pages. Please include contact details for two references.
  3. Book Précis. Maximum 2000 words. Please include: (a) Title; (b) Abstract; (c) Full description (thesis, purpose, methodological approach, and intended contribution to literature); (d) Chapter outline; and (e) Market considerations and intended audience.
  4. Full Book Manuscript, including low-res images (if applicable).
Oct
15
Tue
CFP: 2020 Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology
Oct 15 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 80th Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, NM, March 17-21, 2020.  The theme of the Program is “Cultural Citizenship and Diversity in Complex Societies.”

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution.  We welcome papers from all disciplines.  The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2019.  For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/).

Oct
16
Wed
2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Oct 16 – Oct 19 all-day

The 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society  

October 16-19, 2019 • Hyatt Regency Baltimore Inner Harbor • Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Community-Driven

You can’t stop the people of Baltimore, Maryland, from expressing the enduring traditions that define this City of Neighborhoods, where community-based efforts drive culture, spark change, and sustain place-making. Come to Baltimore and experience what it means to be community driven in a city that illuminates the diverse geographies and peoples of Maryland and the surrounding region—urban, rural, Appalachian, and estuarine.

This meeting will explore what it means for the folklore world to be of, by and for the people—community driven. We invite participants to reveal how communities use the tools of folklore to build partnerships, foster innovation and sustainability, respond to injustice, and create conditions for reconciliation in a time of division and distraction; to explore community-driven curation and preservation in a digitally connected world; and to participate in discussions on building capacity to help folklorists better serve the communities with whom they work. Equally, we invite reflections on folklore as an instrument for constructing and shaping communities themselves, recognizing that this is not always a benevolent process for either insiders or outsiders.

In focusing on what is community driven, we also draw attention to:

  • Partnerships
  • Local responses and resistance
  • Work fostering new connections
  • Grassroots curations of action and sustainability
  • The role of cultural workers in sustaining communities and expressive life
  • The value of (and definitions of) community in times of division
  • Folk and vernacular culture in a digitally connected world
  • Community resilience and solidarity on the front lines of climate change

The Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen relationships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required. We especially welcome proposals for creative presentations in any format that are populated robustly by community members telling their own stories in their own words. Contact [email protected] to discuss alternative presentation formats.

You can find more information about the meeting, including the full theme statement, instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2019AM.

Proposals may be submitted February 15–March 31, 2019.

Oct
21
Mon
CFP: 2020 Southern Studies Conference at AUM
Oct 21 all-day

CFP: Southern Studies Conference, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL January 31-February 1, 2020

 

Now in its twelfth year, the Southern Studies Conference, hosted by Auburn University at Montgomery, explores themes related to the American South across a wide array of disciplines and methodologies.

Registrants to the two-day conference enjoy a variety of peer-reviewed panels, two distinguished keynote speakers, and a lecture and exhibition by a visiting artist. This coming year, the Conference includes an opening reception the evening of January 30th, a professional session oriented towards graduate student attendees, a graduate student poster session competition, and a voluntary Montgomery-based cultural outing on the afternoon of Saturday, February 1st.

The 2020 Southern Studies Conference keynote speakers and visiting artist are distinguished Southern historian Dan T. Carter, who will reflect upon the future of Southern Studies as a discipline; Jodi Skipper, Associate Professor of Anthropology & Southern Studies at University of Mississippi; and photographer Johanna Warwick, whose exhibition “The Bottom” engages with issues of race, class, urban planning, and the built environment in Baton Rouge, LA.

The 2020 Conference Committee invites proposals for pre-formed 90-minute panels or individual twenty- minute academic papers or creative presentations on any aspect of Southern Studies (broadly defined), including those relating to the fields of anthropology, geography, art history, history, literature, theater, music, communications, political science, economics, and sociology. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Southern Economies
  • Southern food studies
  • Pedagogy and the teaching of Southern topics
  • Canonicity and the South
  • Slavery and the American South
  • Civil War narratives
  • Southern archives, museums, and collections
  • Civil Rights narratives
  • Southern Geographies
  • Explorations of race and conflict in the South
  • Religion in the South
  • Southern literature
  • History of science or medicine in the South
  • Southern arts (in any medium or genre)
  • Southern architecture
  • Explorations of the Southern worker
  • Southern politics
  • Anthropological studies of the South
  • Sociological studies of the South
  • Southern music
  • Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
  • Native American topics of the South
  • Stories of immigration/migration and border- crossings
  • Contemporary re/mis-conceptions of “The South”
  • Presentations by artists/performers/writers working in the South/making work about the South

Proposals can be emailed to [email protected] Please submit a 250-word abstract and a 2-page cv for an individual twenty-minute academic paper or creative presentation proposal. Pre-formed 90-minute panel applications should include a 250-word description of the panel, list of speakers and chair/respondent, if applicable, and individual 2-page cvs for each participant.

The deadline for submission is Monday, October 21, 2019. Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend, if accepted. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by November 2019. For more information, visit the conference website, or contact Naomi Slipp, Conference Director and Assistant Professor of Art History, Auburn University at Montgomery: [email protected]

Oct
25
Fri
Chronicity and Crisis: Time in the Medical Humanities
Oct 25 – Oct 26 all-day

The Montclair State University Medical Humanities Program and the Waiting Times Research Group are pleased to sponsor “Chronicity and Crisis: Time in the Medical Humanities”

 

Montclair State University in Montclair, New Jersey
October 25–26, 2019

To register: please click here

 

Keynote Speakers

Dr. Mark Solms
Chair, Neuropsychology, University of Cape Town & Groote Schuur Hospital
Title: “A Man Who Got Lost in Time:  Feeling and Uncertainty in the Face of Oblivion”

Dr. Rishi Goyal
Director, Medicine, Literature and Society Program, Columbia University
Title: “Crisis, Catastrophe and Emergency: Disentangling Temporal Patterns of Care and Response”

 

The conference will bring together scholars from the humanities and social sciences as well as the psychosocial disciplines, health studies, and biomedicine to examine how the concepts of chronicity and crisis inform historical and contemporary understandings of health, illness and well-being. “Chronicity and Crisis” aims to open up the relationship between the long term and the urgent in order to address a range of questions in individual, social and global health.

The temporal aligning of care and illness — the potentially long time-frames of care as juxtaposed to the urgency of acute interventions — factors into the success of diverse medical treatments.  From the prioritization of wait times in emergency centers to approvals by insurance companies and the monitoring of chronic physical and mental illnesses, care is determined by more than the treatment at hand.  Likewise, adverse public health outcomes arise from social inequities and inequalities of long historical duration, including the chronic legacies of colonial violence, the inaccessibility of public spaces for the less abled, the health risks of environmental neglect, or gender imbalances in the subjects of medical research. The narrative markers of onset, frequency, and remission inform how the experiences of sudden and chronic illnesses are communicated, from self-reporting and clinical records to medical fiction, biography, and memoir.

The conference is accessible and open to the public.

Please contact Jefferson Gatrall for assistance with registration.

Nov
7
Thu
Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting @ Bloomington, Indiana
Nov 7 – Nov 10 all-day

Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting – Bloomington, IN, Nov 7-10, 2019

The Society for Ethnomusicology will hold its 64th Annual Meeting on November 7-10, 2019, at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The meeting will be hosted by Indiana University in conjunction with the IU Bicentennial (1820-2020). For the Call for Proposals, abstract submission instructions, and preliminary meeting information, please visit the SEM 2019 area of the SEM website (www.ethnomusicology.org).

In conjunction with the SEM Annual Meeting, two concurrent pre-conference symposia will be presented on November 6: “Film as Ethnography, Activism, and Public Work in Ethnomusicology” and “Heritage and the Politics of Inclusion in Latin American Brass Bands.”

Visit the conference website for more information about the Annual Meeting, pre-conference symposia, online registration, and hotel accommodations.