Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Feb
28
Wed
Call for Nominations: The 2018 Clyde Snow Social Justice Award
Feb 28 all-day

The Center for Social Justice at the University of Oklahoma invites nominations for the award honoring the work of forensic anthropologist, Dr. Clyde Snow.  The award recognizes the efforts of those who strive to restore the humanity and dignity of individuals and communities that have suffered human rights violations.

Nominees should have a record of efforts towards supporting survivors of human rights abuses, honoring victims of atrocities, and advocating on behalf of communities in the pursuit of justice.  Individuals or groups may nominate themselves, or be nominated by someone else.  Nominators should submit a completed application, consisting of the nomination form, a copy of the nominee’s resume (or a chronological summary of accomplishments, if the nominee is a group), and a letter of nomination detailing the nominee’s efforts and accomplishments.  Letters of nomination should:

  1. demonstrate the nominees’ leadership, courage, and compassion in their work advocating for victims of human rights abuses;
  2. give a clear history of the nominees’ involvement with their causes; and
  3. explain how the nominees’ efforts give continuity to Dr. Snow’s work.

If the nominee makes the nomination, a letter of recommendation should also be included.  Supporting documentation, in the form of media coverage, photos, videos, artwork, and testimonials, is encouraged, but these materials cannot be returned to the nominator.  We accept nominations in the following UNESCO languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.  The deadline for submission of all materials is February 28, 2018.  The award will be conferred at a banquet at the University in Norman, Oklahoma in September 2018.

Additionally, the Center seeks donations to sustain the award and celebrate the work of Dr. Snow. The endowment will be used bi-annually for a monetary award of $5000 and the production of the award sculpture designed by Oklahoma artist Harvey Pratt, as well as travel expenses, room and board for the awardee, and the costs of the award banquet.

All information about the award, including the nomination form and guidelines for nominations, can be found at this website.  Questions may be directed to the Center for Social Justice at [email protected] or call (405) 325-5787.

Established in 2009, the Center for Social Justice is an initiative of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, based in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Oklahoma.  The Center works to promote gender justice, equality, tolerance, and human rights through local and global engagement.

Mar
1
Thu
Society for Economic Anthropology (SEA) Spring Conference: Water and Economy
Mar 1 – Mar 3 all-day

Water is Life. The refrain of water rights activists globally is an invitation to consider the many ways in which water is essential to human economy, environments, and health. The theme of this SEA conference is the role of water in human economic life – from studies of water management in ancient societies, to irrigation in agrarian settings, to informal economies of water in squatter settlements, to social movements to secure a human right to water.

Thinking Gender, Pre-existing Conditions
Mar 1 – Mar 2 all-day

Thinking Gender, Pre-existing Conditions

28th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference

March 1-2, 2018

UCLA Faculty Center

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Terri Conley, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan

FEATURED WORKSHOP: Trauma-Informed Yoga led by Zabie Yamasaki, Program Director of Trauma-Informed Yoga Programs at UCLA

 

The UCLA Center for the Study of Women invites submissions of paper, poster, speed pitching research roundtable, and visual arts proposals for our 28th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference. This year’s conference theme, Pre-existing Conditions, will focus on the interactions of health and gender as a play on the current, on-going discussions about gender-focused health and healthcare. Pre-existing Conditions invites conversations about the directions and foci of intersectional and multi-contextual approaches to health and well-being. With our focus on gender and health, Thinking Gender 2018, Pre-existing Conditions, welcomes submissions of graduate student projects on a wide range of health and health-related topics (see the attached call or visit http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP for details).

 

Deadline for All Proposal Submissions: November 1, 2017

Submission Information

We invite proposal submissions for the following categories:

  • Panel Presentations
  • Posters
  • Speed Pitching Research Roundtables
  • Visual Arts Reception and Exhibition

Registered graduate students from any institution are eligible to submit presentation proposals for all Thinking Gender sessions, including the panel, poster, speed pitching research roundtable, and Visual Arts Reception & Exhibition sessions.

Registered undergraduate students from any institution are eligible to submit proposals for poster presentations and participation in the Visual Arts Reception & Exhibition only.

Full details – including proposal length requirements and additional specifications – are available in the attached call for proposals and on our website at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP.

To participate in Thinking Gender, successful applicants will be required to pay a registration fee of $50, the entirety of which will go towards covering conference costs. Participants for whom the registration fee is prohibitive are encouraged to contact [email protected].

Deadlines

The deadline for all submission proposals is November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made online via the link at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP. Once submissions are reviewed and accepted, all participants in the paper panel sessions will be required to submit a draft of their paper by January 29, 2018, for pre-circulation among their co-panelists and faculty moderator.

For full details, including proposal length requirements, additional specifications, and a link to the online submission system, visit http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP.

Mar
7
Wed
Anthrosophia 2018
Mar 7 – Mar 10 all-day

ANTHROSOPHIA 2018: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Philosophy, Anthropology, and Allied Disciplines

Dates:                     March 7–10, 2018

Location:               Center for Human-Environmental Research

3400 St. Claude Ave., New Orleans, LA 70117

 

Founded in 2015, Anthrosophia is an annual interdisciplinary conference bridging the fields of philosophy, anthropology, and allied social sciences. The conference is dedicated to the holistic investigation of the questions of how and why human societies organize themselves in the diverse ways that we do today, and have done in the past. The basic premise of Anthrosophia is that the fields of philosophy and anthropology have much more in common than is typically acknowledged. Philosophical claims about humans and human societies had to start somewhere and, indeed, they usually began as basic empirical generalizations about the nature of human behavior. Anthropology began as an offshoot from the field philosophy in the early 19th century and it continues to carry the same fundamental set of theoretical building blocks with it into the present day.

As an interdisciplinary conference, Anthrosophia aims to articulate the theoretical principles, methodological orientations, and empirical data that form the basis of philosophy and anthropology as traditionally distinct fields. Through this collaboration, we hope to identify persistent shortcomings and biases in our thinking about the nature of human social life and to find better ways forward.

Participants may give oral presentations of up to 20 minutes. If you wish to present a paper, we ask you to submit a 150-word abstract outlining your topic to [email protected] by January 2nd. Please also indicate your preference about which day you would like to present. (We do our best to accommodate these preferences but we can’t make any promises!)

The Anthrosophia scholarly society also publishes a journal of the same name. Papers presented at the Anthrosophia conference may be considered for publication in this journal, though we also accept unrelated submissions. For more information about the Anthrosophia conference and the journal, please visit http: //www.cherscience.org.

 

Conference Program Committee: Drew Chastain (co-chair), Loyola University New Orleans; Grant S. McCall (co-chair), C.H.E.R. and Tulane University; Karl Widerquist, Georgetown University SFS-Qatar; Enzo Rossi, University of Amsterdam

Any questions about the conference should be directed to [email protected]

 

 

Registration:

Student/unemployed registration:                 $25

Junior professional registration:                    $50 (Postdocs, Assistant Professors, etc.)

Senior professional registration:                   $100 (Associate and Full Professors, etc.)

 

*We ask that all conference participants remit registration fees as stated above. If these fees are a hardship and might prevent you from participating, please email [email protected] to request a reduction.

Mar
8
Thu
Society for Linguistic Anthropology (SLA) Inaugural Conference: New:  Media, Messages, Meanings, E-Motions
Mar 8 – Mar 11 all-day

The Society for Linguistic Anthropology invites submissions for its inaugural annual spring meeting March 8-10, 2018 at the University of Pennsylvania. We welcome panels and presentations, posters, and multi-modal installations from a wide variety of scholarly directions dedicated to the study of language and semiosis in their social and cultural contexts. Scholars of Anthropology, Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, and adjacent disciplines are all invited to participate.

The theme “New: Media, Messages, Meanings, E-motions” invites thinking through how language and semiosis more broadly are involved in producing new and contingent forms and functions. From thinking about mass media to affective states, from new forms of message to the shifting indexicalities of their meaning, the meetings provide an opportunity to think through how new forms and functions emerge, how participants perceive and describe them, and what kinds of anxieties and possibilities are produced. The terms “media, message, meaning, and e-motion” are meant to suggest possible clusters of analysis to think through how new forms of semiosis emerge, challenge older forms, and show the effects of contingency in social life.

To think through these points, we invite presentations connected to, but not limited to,the following clusters of topics:

MEDIA

A great deal of scholarship is currently directed to understanding the anxieties resulting from mass media as well as new social media platforms, and how reality or fakeness is produced. How is mass communication changing with new developments in technology? How are notions of authentic selves and face-to-face communication being disturbed, and what reactions are being provoked in response? Further, linguistic anthropology has always emphasized that all interaction is mediated in some way. When does the materiality of language, the increasingly varied forms through which linguistic signs are communicated, matter? How are particular affordances enabling and constraining how new forms and function emerge?

MESSAGES

One long-term contribution of linguistic anthropology has been to show that messages cannot be reduced to denotationally explicit content, and that messages aren’t simply transmitted from sender or speaker to receiver or addressee. Messages today seem to come in any number of new or changed forms, which can reach participants at limited or larger scale–from gossip to the political candidate’s extended campaign, from text messages to viral memes. Other new message forms can emerge as part of new registers, styles, and genres. How are messages signaled, transmitted, and co-constituted? And how do new types of contexts and forms of participation change what counts as a message?

MEANING

More historical work has sought to consider how change is shaped by the very structural relations found in language and semiosis. Under what conditions do new meanings become apparent to communities of speakers, and how are old meanings still playing a role?

E-MOTION

Attention to affective stances and states is now a core area of research in studies of language and semiosis. How are such stances and states brought into being, and how are they connected to the multiple scales of communication and forms of mediation?

Mar
22
Thu
American Ethnological Society (AES) and Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Joint Spring Conference: Resemblance
Mar 22 – Mar 24 all-day

In an era of “fake news” and “alt” political movements, what counts as meaning making? How can we understand epistemology in an era of madness? The issue of resemblance is as much a pressing social question as it is an academic preoccupation. The American Ethnological Society and the Society for Visual Anthropology explore the theme of resemblance at their 2018 joint spring conference. Welcoming anthropologists, artists, media makers, and community members to Philadelphia during March 22-24, the meeting will provide an opportunity to revisit and explore anew what we believe is knowable as anthropologists and the ways we may wish to rethink our priorities and approaches in our era of heightened violence, strife, surveillance, and policing.

Resemblance is at the very heart of anthropology, as its practitioners have sought to demonstrate the commonalities of all people. While resemblance relies upon recognition and likening, it is also a means of comparison to what one perceives and believes they already know. The conference organizers invite proposals for panels consisting of papers or multimodal presentations, as well as individual submissions that theoretically, methodologically, visually, or otherwise examine the conference theme. We welcome graduate students to present their work in its early stages and to network with more establish practitioners. The conference will feature exhibitions, speakers, films, performances, as well as a town hall discussion about how our field can wield greater influence in public struggles of resemblance.

Immigration Futures: Marking 20 Years of the National Metropolis Conference
Mar 22 – Mar 24 all-day

The National Metropolis Conference is an annual forum for researchers, policy makers, representatives from community and settlement organizations to get together to share and exchange knowledge and experience in the field of immigration and settlement.

The National Metropolis Conference will focus on future immigration trends and policies and the challenges and opportunities that they create for Canadian society. The conference will include plenary panels with distinguished speakers and workshop and roundtable sessions on a wide variety of topics related to immigration and diversity.

Register for the conference at https://www.metropolisconference.ca/en/registration.php.

Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness (SAC) Spring Conference: Altered States, Sound, Ritual and Healing Today, Both in Traditional Cultures and Non Traditional
Mar 22 – Mar 25 all-day

Healing is one function attributed to shamanic practice and is fundamental to many of the esoteric principals of ritual and spiritual healing beliefs that have been part of our world’s cultures. Sound weather chanting, sacred sounds, and instruments of varying types are also used to form the vessel of healing. Exploring the various uses and meaning of ritual, sound, and altered states invites a deeper understanding of why these elements are conflated into the healing arts of many cultures ancient and newly forming sub-cultures around the world.  The theme of the 2018 conference concerns the diverse ways in which these healing practices are used and being transformed by technology and modern world philosophy; and how these modalities of sound and ritual have significance in healing practices around the world today.

Mar
30
Fri
CFP: EPIC 2018
Mar 30 all-day

How is evidence created, used, and abused? The EPIC2018 theme is Evidence, conceptualized in the broadest sense. We’ll focus on methods both new and tried-and-true, the changing types of evidence that are now possible, and how to make a case with evidence in a challenging social environment.

The program committee invites proposals for Papers, Case Studies, PechaKucha, Film/Animation, and Gallery presentations that address evidence creation, use, and abuse. (Salons and Tutorials will be part of the EPIC2018 program, but organized by invitation.) We are also extending a special invitation to data and computer scientists, and ethnographer + data/computer scientist collaborators.

Most contributions should draw on theoretical advances in ethnographically informed social science research and aligned disciplines, coupled with applied best practices from professional fields. They should show new directions for creating knowledge and making change. We welcome contributions from any discipline, industry, or organization in the private, public, or nonprofit sectors that creates and applies ethnography.

Submit to EPIC2018!

  • Submission deadline—March 30
  • Acceptance notification—June 8

Invitation to Submit

Research methods are proliferating, yet the connection between evidence and decisions seems more tenuous than ever. EPIC2018 will explore the richness of methods, tools, and approaches in contemporary ethnographic practice; the changing types of evidence that are now possible; and how to make a case with evidence in a challenging social environment.

The Conference Committee is accepting submissions in these categories:
Papers • Case Studies • PechaKucha • Film/Animation • Gallery

We particularly encourage submissions at the emerging intersection of data science and ethnography. In addition to contributions from the many fields that regularly engage in ethnographic work, we invite data and computer scientists, as well as teams of ethnographers + data/computer scientists.

Mar
31
Sat
2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Mar 31 all-day

2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
October 17-20, 2018
Buffalo Niagara County Convention Center
Buffalo, New York, USA

Proposal submission deadline: March 31, 2017

 

No Illusions, No Exclusions

The meeting theme, “No Illusions, No Exclusions,” is inspired by its location in Buffalo, New York, “The City of No Illusions.”

Buffalo is proudly gutsy, realistic, highly vernacular and inclusive. The city openly welcomes recent refugees, who enhance the substantial diversity brought about by its remarkable industrial heritage and legacy of Native Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) First Nations. Buffalo’s post-industrial transformation brings with it challenges of gentrification, reconfiguration of the labor force and new symbolic strategies of self-representation.

Participants in the annual meeting are encouraged to explore how, at this divisive moment in American life, folklore confronts economic and social disruptions, builds community resilience and sustains pluralism amidst threats to E Pluribus Unum.

Participants are invited to present with colleagues from other disciplines and our community collaborators in recognition of folklore as an inherently inclusive, multidisciplinary field of study. As a discipline, folklore cannot stand in isolation from other fields as it shapes and is shaped by other disciplines while endeavoring to sustain itself as an autonomous discipline. In considering folklore as both academic discipline and public practice, participants are encouraged to examine how folklore engages community members as partners, valuing local knowledge and facilitating cultural self-determination.

The 129th Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen friendships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required.

You can find more information about the meeting, including instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events, beginning February 1, 2018, at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2018AM.

 

Contact information:

Lorraine Walsh Cashman
American Folklore Society
812-856-2422
www.afsnet.org
[email protected]