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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Oct
21
Mon
CFP: 2020 Southern Studies Conference at AUM
Oct 21 all-day

CFP: Southern Studies Conference, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL January 31-February 1, 2020

 

Now in its twelfth year, the Southern Studies Conference, hosted by Auburn University at Montgomery, explores themes related to the American South across a wide array of disciplines and methodologies.

Registrants to the two-day conference enjoy a variety of peer-reviewed panels, two distinguished keynote speakers, and a lecture and exhibition by a visiting artist. This coming year, the Conference includes an opening reception the evening of January 30th, a professional session oriented towards graduate student attendees, a graduate student poster session competition, and a voluntary Montgomery-based cultural outing on the afternoon of Saturday, February 1st.

The 2020 Southern Studies Conference keynote speakers and visiting artist are distinguished Southern historian Dan T. Carter, who will reflect upon the future of Southern Studies as a discipline; Jodi Skipper, Associate Professor of Anthropology & Southern Studies at University of Mississippi; and photographer Johanna Warwick, whose exhibition “The Bottom” engages with issues of race, class, urban planning, and the built environment in Baton Rouge, LA.

The 2020 Conference Committee invites proposals for pre-formed 90-minute panels or individual twenty- minute academic papers or creative presentations on any aspect of Southern Studies (broadly defined), including those relating to the fields of anthropology, geography, art history, history, literature, theater, music, communications, political science, economics, and sociology. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Southern Economies
  • Southern food studies
  • Pedagogy and the teaching of Southern topics
  • Canonicity and the South
  • Slavery and the American South
  • Civil War narratives
  • Southern archives, museums, and collections
  • Civil Rights narratives
  • Southern Geographies
  • Explorations of race and conflict in the South
  • Religion in the South
  • Southern literature
  • History of science or medicine in the South
  • Southern arts (in any medium or genre)
  • Southern architecture
  • Explorations of the Southern worker
  • Southern politics
  • Anthropological studies of the South
  • Sociological studies of the South
  • Southern music
  • Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
  • Native American topics of the South
  • Stories of immigration/migration and border- crossings
  • Contemporary re/mis-conceptions of “The South”
  • Presentations by artists/performers/writers working in the South/making work about the South

Proposals can be emailed to [email protected] Please submit a 250-word abstract and a 2-page cv for an individual twenty-minute academic paper or creative presentation proposal. Pre-formed 90-minute panel applications should include a 250-word description of the panel, list of speakers and chair/respondent, if applicable, and individual 2-page cvs for each participant.

The deadline for submission is Monday, October 21, 2019. Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend, if accepted. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by November 2019. For more information, visit the conference website, or contact Naomi Slipp, Conference Director and Assistant Professor of Art History, Auburn University at Montgomery: [email protected]

Nov
1
Fri
Embodiment and literacies: Teaching, learning, and becoming in a post- world CFP
Nov 1 all-day

Special issue call for papers from English Teaching: Practice & Critique

Special Issue of English Teaching: Practice and Critique

Embodiment and literacies: Teaching, learning, and becoming in a post- world
Guest Editors: Stavroula Kontovourki, Elisabeth Johnson, Grace Enriquez

In recent years, there has been a surge in literacy studies research that transgresses views of literacy as a set of skills or socially situated meaning-making practices to reconfigure meaning making at the intersection of human subjects and materials. Following broader trends in the social and humanist sciences, such ontological, epistemological, and axiological reconfigurations rework notions of agency, politics, and ethics (e.g., Barad, 2003; Davies et al., 2013; Lather & St. Pierre, 2013; St. Pierre, 2014). This re-theorization has been instantiated in the renaming of literacies as im/material (Burnett et al., 2014), post-human (Kuby & Rowsell, 2017), and trans- (Stornaiuolo, Smith, & Phillips, 2017). Across such work, we see a concern with flows, emergences, difference, and potential: flows of affect and cognition and in connected space-times, entanglements of humans and nonhumans, unexpected encounters and meaning-making practices, transgressions and possibilities of/for new matterings and becomings (e.g., Boldt & Leander, 2017, Ehret, Hollet, & Jocius, 2016; Leander & Ehret, 2019; Marsh, 2017). These post-era trends emphasize how meanings of literacy and learners’ identities flow in connected space-times, where humans and nonhumans are entangled and unexpectedly encountered. These flows, entanglements, and encounters make new ways of mattering and being possible.

Within this broader move, we see much value in understanding literacy as embodied, (i.e., as of material bodies, subjective feelings, and produced identities, interacting across non-human materials, spaces and times, while risking and affirming recognition). This understanding invites researchers and educators to examine different ways bodies matter in literacy teaching and learning; to wonder how literate bodies (of educators and learners) are simultaneously disciplined and disciplining; feeling and affective; impossible to represent but also possible to present anew; and thus, mobile and indeterminate (Johnson & Kontovourki, 2016). In effect, one is invited to consider literate bodies as not only acting and feeling objects, but also as sites where humans, materials, and ideas entangle to make up particular meanings of literacy, of pedagogy, and of people.

Focusing on literacy pedagogies, we invite submissions that foreground bodies and incorporate premises of different post- theories to engage with questions like:

  1. Whose bodies are recognized as relevant (or not) at different pedagogical moments? How are recognitions tied to norms that circulate social relations and ways teachers and students mis/recognize their roles in defining what matters as literacy?
  2. What feelings and emotions circulate at the entanglement of bodies, texts, and objects, illuminating spaces of control and possibility? How can emergent difference and transformation speak back to structures like schooling? In what moments can this newness even be paradoxical, violent, and potentially inequitable?
  3. What kinds of meaning-making occur as students disrupt expectations or teachers follow the lead of students or materials? How do unexpected engagements across bodies and materials help us re-imagine literacy in school and other institutional spaces?

Considering the embodiment of literacy in these terms constitutes an ethico-political project of tracing the boundaries of literacies and literacy pedagogies in a post- world. Maintaining the focus on criticality, this special issue aims to contribute to the art of the im/possible by showcasing examples of practice where both possibility and constriction, paradoxes of newness and difference, inclusion and exclusion emerge.

Submission Details
Submissions for this Special Issue must be made through the ScholarOne online submission and peer review system. Please refer to the ETPC Author Guidelines for guidelines on submissions, including word limits. For inquiries on the special issue, you may contact Stavroula Kontovourki ([email protected]), Elisabeth Johnson ([email protected]), or Grace Enriquez ([email protected]).

Submission date: November 1, 2019

Nov
6
Wed
CFP: Cinema and the City: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Nov 6 all-day

Call for Papers
Cinema and the City: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

International Conference
November 29-30, 2019

University of Palermo, Department of Architecture, viale delle Scienze
Room 1.3 and 1.4, Main Building

Deadline for proposals: November 6, 2019

 

The conference aims to explore the relationships established between cinema and urban areas. We want to stress the connections woven between cities and cinema, films, fiction and documentaries – important unconventional sources for the understanding of social and cultural contexts. We intend to focus on the modalities used in films to tell stories – through images and speech – concerning cities, territories, and places, residents’ lives in relation to spaces, to buildings, to landscapes, as well as to its urban culture as a whole. The perspective we have chosen for this conference is interdisciplinary and cinema will be considered as a medium to be understood and interpreted in several, possibly comparative, ways. Actually, cinema, as a specific cultural artefact, expresses both individual and collective viewpoints mirroring cultures and hybridizations that can be explored by various disciplines and comparative perspectives. This complexity, possible reflection of the contemporary world, is perhaps more tangible in cinema than in other expressive forms, making it accessible to many people and at the same time a medium in which several genres and contents meet and can be analysed and compared. We are particularly interested in comparative perspectives and interdisciplinary viewpoints. As a result, the conference aims to engage researchers from different countries and various fields of study in order to explore the multiple ways through which cinema is able to contain and manifest crucial aspects of cities and urban spaces. Anthropologists, architects, urban planners, geographers, sociologists, film critics, semioticians, scholars of aesthetics, of images, of cultural studies, as well as film directors, documentary film makers and designers are invited to share their experiences and their ideas. We intend to collect the articles and publish them in a collective volume.

 

The Committee welcomes papers on any-related topic. Suggested topics may include:

 

  • Cultural and social exchanges and/or conflicts between cultures, people and places
  • Cultural hybridizations
  • Urban spaces: the concrete building
  • Urban spaces: the symbolic building
  • Urban spaces: beauty
  • Urban spaces: transformation
  • Urban spaces: relationships between people
  • Living, moving, dwelling
  • Urban economy and the real estate market
  • Urban rituals
  • Visual imaginaries
  • Cities and comics
  • Film photography and urban spaces
  • Food and cities
  • Politics, cinema and cities
  • Ghettoes and cities as “prisons”
  • Urban distress and marginalization, inclusion and exclusion
  • Transforming urban spaces
  • Centres, suburbs, gentrification
  • Cities and dreams
  • Urban biographies: telling the city
  • Everyday life and urban infrastructures
  • Domestic spaces and cities
  • Identity and urban configurations
  • Old and new methodologies of analysis
  • Imaginary horizons and cities
  • Perception, interaction and urban spaces
  • Urban Resilience/Resistance

 

Scientific Coordinators

Flavia Schiavo and Stefano Montes

 

Organizing committee

Flavia Schiavo, Stefano Montes, Leonardo Mercatanti, Federico Montanari, Alessandro Prato, Gaetano Sabato, Giusi Coppola, Massimo Bonura, Alessio Arena

 

Administrative organisation

Department of Architecture, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze 90128, Palermo

 

Proposals  and information should be sent to:

Flavia Schiavo ([email protected]) and Stefano Montes ([email protected])

 

Deadline for proposals and biodata: November 6, 2019

Proposal abstract and title: max 250 words

Time for speech: 20 minutes

Languages used in the conferences: Italian, English, French and Spanish

 

Participation is free, travelling, accommodation and meals are covered by participants.

Nov
7
Thu
Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting @ Bloomington, Indiana
Nov 7 – Nov 10 all-day

Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting – Bloomington, IN, Nov 7-10, 2019

The Society for Ethnomusicology will hold its 64th Annual Meeting on November 7-10, 2019, at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The meeting will be hosted by Indiana University in conjunction with the IU Bicentennial (1820-2020). For the Call for Proposals, abstract submission instructions, and preliminary meeting information, please visit the SEM 2019 area of the SEM website (www.ethnomusicology.org).

In conjunction with the SEM Annual Meeting, two concurrent pre-conference symposia will be presented on November 6: “Film as Ethnography, Activism, and Public Work in Ethnomusicology” and “Heritage and the Politics of Inclusion in Latin American Brass Bands.”

Visit the conference website for more information about the Annual Meeting, pre-conference symposia, online registration, and hotel accommodations.

Sep
2
Wed
COMELA 2020 @ American College of Greece, Athens, Greece
Sep 2 – Sep 5 all-day

The COMELA 2020 – The (Annual) Conference on Mediterranean and European Linguistic Anthropology 2020

American College of Greece, Athens, Greece, September 2 – 5, 2020

https://comela2020.acg.edu

Information

Following the growth of the COMELA, The Conference on Mediterranean and European Linguistic Anthropology, we announce The COMELA 2020, September 2-5, 2020, at The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece.

The COMELA seeks to redefine scholarship on Mediterranean and European Language and Society.

 

Purpose and Structure

The COMELA 2020 invites academics in the fields of Linguistics, Anthropology, Linguistic and Cultural Anthropology, and Ethnology, pertinent to The Mediterranean and Europe, to discuss work, and engage in scholarly collaborations, thus strengthening global academic networks in the field.

 

Location

American College of Greece
Athens, Greece

 

Keynote and Plenary Speakers 

Jan Blommaert – Tilburg University
Alexandra Georgakopoulou – King’s College London
Dimitris Dalakoglou – Vrije University Amsterdam

Partners

  • Taylor and Francis Global Publishers (Official Publishing Partner)
  • 120 major academic institutions globally
  • Scientific Committee of over 120 academics

Publications

Journal Special Issues, and Monographs, from papers submitted that meet publication requirements. Papers selected will be published with Top-Tier journals. Here, ample assistance will be provided to revise manuscripts.

All COMELA Conference proceedings will be SCOPUS published.

 

Dates

Abstract and poster proposal submission – June 1, 2019 – November 15, 2019

Notification of acceptance – No later than December 30, 2019 (for those submitted prior to this)

Registration

  • Early bird – October 30, 2019 – January 21, 2020
  • Normal bird – January 22, 2020 – April 25, 2020
    • Presenters must register by April 25, 2020, to guarantee a place in the program. Registration will remain open after this, but conference organizers cannot guarantee placement in the conference.
  • Late bird – April 26, 2020 – September 5, 2020 (Conference end)

 

Conference dates

Wednesday September 2, 2020 – Saturday September 5, 2020

Final day comprises optional Anthropological excursion (separate cost)

 

Abstract submissions

The Call for Abstracts opens on June 1, 2019, at https://comela2020.acg.edu, which contains all information

 

Anthropological Excursion

Several options
Attica, Greece

 

Theme

Bounded Languages … Unbounded

Politics of identity are central to language change. Here, linguistic boundaries rise and fall, motivating the ephemeral characteristics of language communities. The Mediterranean and European region is one replete with histories, with power struggles, uniquely demarcating nation, ethnicity, and community. For this, cultural and political identities, language ideologies, as well as the languages themselves, have sought boundedness, dynamics of which have indeed sought change over eons, through demographic movements, through geopolitics, through technological innovation. In a current era of technological advancement, transnational fluidity, intellectual power, capitalism, and new sexualities, then, we question, once again, the boundedness of language and identity, and ways in which to unbound languages and ideologies. More than before, we now increasingly pursue anthropological toil, so to innovate ways to locate these ideologies and their fluid boundaries, actively. We now need to increasingly unbind these languages, and their ideologies, so to arrive at progressive realizations, and to rectify, or at least see and move past, the segregations of old.

The COMELA 2020 theme, “Bounded languages… Unbounded”, encapsulates the ongoing struggle throughout Mediterranean and European regions. As the continuous tension between demarcation, and the concurrent legitimization, of languages, language ideologies, and language identities, enters an era where new modes of interactivity require language communities to take on roles super-ordinate to the past, flexible citizenship now operates within, and not only across, language communities, to unbind languages, and to create new boundaries, unlike those ever seen throughout history.

The COMELA 2020 invites work which addresses the shifting boundedness of Language Communities of the Mediterranean and Europe. Papers and posters should acknowledge and describe processes of language shape, change, and ideology, pertinent to social, cultural, political histories, and futures of Mediterranean and European regions, and by those working in Mediterranean and European regions.

 

Strands

Abstract and poster proposals should address one or more of the key strands related to Mediterranean and European countries and regions:

  • Anthropological Linguistics
  • Applied Sociolinguistics
  • Buddhist studies and discourses
  • Cognitive Anthropology and Language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Ethnographical Language Work
  • Ethnography of Communication
  • General Sociolinguistics
  • Islamic Studies and discourses
  • Language, Community, Ethnicity
  • Language Contact and Change
  • Language, Dialect, Sociolect, Genre
  • Language Documentation
  • Language, Gender, Sexuality
  • Language Ideologies
  • Language Minorities and Majorities
  • Language Revitalization
  • Language in Real and Virtual Spaces
  • Language Socialization
  • Language and Spatiotemporal Frames
  • Multi functionality
  • Narrative and Meta narrative
  • Nonverbal Semiotics
  • Poetics
  • Post-Structuralism and Language
  • Semiotics and Semiology
  • Social Psychology of Language
  • Text, Context, Entextualization

 

Presentation lengths

  • Colloquia – 1.5 hours with 3-5 contributors (Parts A and B are possible, thus 6-10 contributors)
  • General paper sessions – Approx. 20-25 minutes each, including 5 mins for questions/responses
  • Posters – to be displayed at designated times throughout the COMELA 2020

 

Submission Guidelines (via the online submission website, or by email (see below))

General session papers

  • 18-word maximum title
  • 400-word maximum abstract, including references

Colloquia

  • Submission of only the main abstract for colloquium required
  • Abstract must contain the colloquium main description, and a summary of each individual paper within the colloquium

 

Evaluation of proposals

  • All abstracts for general sessions will be double blind reviewed.
  • Main parent abstracts for colloquia will be double blind reviewed. All abstracts for individual presentations within each colloquia will not be peer reviewed, but are expected to be at a standard commensurate to the colloquium parent abstract.

Review of criteria are as follows:

  • Appropriateness and significance to COMELA themes
  • Originality/significance/impact of the research
  • Clarity/coherence of research concerns
  • Theoretical and analytical framework(s)
  • Description of research, data collection, findings/conclusions, rhetoric, and exegesis as a whole
  • For colloquia, importance/significance of the overarching topic and/or framework(s) addressed, and its coherence of and with individual presentations.

 

For more information, please contact:

Chair

Professor Helena Maragou

Helena P. Maragou, PhD

Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The American College of Greece

 

Head of Communications

Ms. Nhan Huynh

[email protected]
https://comela2020.acg.edu