Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected]ananthro.org.

 

Sep
25
Wed
ACLS King Fellowship to Support Pre-Columbian Art History
Sep 25 all-day

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) is pleased to announce the establishment of the H. and T. King Fellowship in Pre-Columbian Art History as part of our central ACLS Fellowship program. ACLS will begin naming King Fellows in 2020.

ACLS King Fellowships will support scholars whose research contributes to the understanding of art and its history in Pre-Columbian cultures of Latin America.

“We are enormously grateful to the King family for this generous contribution, which represents a new area for ACLS. We hope that this fellowship will foster innovative scholarship in the field of Pre-Columbian art history,” said Pauline Yu, ACLS president. The field of study is understood capaciously, to include material culture and architecture prior to European encounters, epigraphy, historical and documentary accounts, and ethnographic study that aids in our understanding of the visual culture of the period.

The fellowship will be awarded annually to scholars who apply through the central ACLS Fellowship program. ACLS Fellowships support research projects whose ultimate goal is a major piece of scholarly work. Awards range from $40,000 to $70,000 (depending on career stage) and are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve months to teaching and writing.

Application information will be available on our website by July 2019.

Contact: Matthew Goldfeder, [email protected]

Oct
10
Thu
2020-21 National Humanities Center Residential Fellowship Competition
Oct 10 all-day

The National Humanities Center invites applications for academic-year or one-semester residential fellowships. Mid-career, senior, and emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work from all areas of the humanities are encouraged to apply.

Scholars from all parts of the globe are eligible; stipends and travel expenses are provided. Fellowship applicants must have a PhD or equivalent scholarly credentials. Fellowships are supported by the Center’s own endowment, private foundation grants, contributions from alumni and friends, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Located in the vibrant Research Triangle region of North Carolina, the Center affords access to the rich cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. Fellows enjoy private studies, in-house dining, and superb library services that deliver all research materials.

Applications are due by 11:59 p.m. ET, October 10, 2019. For more information and to apply, please visit the link below.

https://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/become-a-fellow/

Oct
15
Tue
CFP: 2020 Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology
Oct 15 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA) invites abstracts (sessions, papers and posters) for the Program of the 80th Annual Meeting in Albuquerque, NM, March 17-21, 2020.  The theme of the Program is “Cultural Citizenship and Diversity in Complex Societies.”

The Society is a multi-disciplinary association that focuses on problem definition and resolution.  We welcome papers from all disciplines.  The deadline for abstract submission is October 15, 2019.  For additional information on the theme, abstract size/format, and the meeting, please visit our web page (www.sfaa.net/annual-meeting/).

Oct
16
Wed
2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Oct 16 – Oct 19 all-day

The 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society  

October 16-19, 2019 • Hyatt Regency Baltimore Inner Harbor • Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Community-Driven

You can’t stop the people of Baltimore, Maryland, from expressing the enduring traditions that define this City of Neighborhoods, where community-based efforts drive culture, spark change, and sustain place-making. Come to Baltimore and experience what it means to be community driven in a city that illuminates the diverse geographies and peoples of Maryland and the surrounding region—urban, rural, Appalachian, and estuarine.

This meeting will explore what it means for the folklore world to be of, by and for the people—community driven. We invite participants to reveal how communities use the tools of folklore to build partnerships, foster innovation and sustainability, respond to injustice, and create conditions for reconciliation in a time of division and distraction; to explore community-driven curation and preservation in a digitally connected world; and to participate in discussions on building capacity to help folklorists better serve the communities with whom they work. Equally, we invite reflections on folklore as an instrument for constructing and shaping communities themselves, recognizing that this is not always a benevolent process for either insiders or outsiders.

In focusing on what is community driven, we also draw attention to:

  • Partnerships
  • Local responses and resistance
  • Work fostering new connections
  • Grassroots curations of action and sustainability
  • The role of cultural workers in sustaining communities and expressive life
  • The value of (and definitions of) community in times of division
  • Folk and vernacular culture in a digitally connected world
  • Community resilience and solidarity on the front lines of climate change

The Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen relationships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required. We especially welcome proposals for creative presentations in any format that are populated robustly by community members telling their own stories in their own words. Contact [email protected] to discuss alternative presentation formats.

You can find more information about the meeting, including the full theme statement, instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2019AM.

Proposals may be submitted February 15–March 31, 2019.

Oct
18
Fri
UCI Global Scholars Early Career Fellowship
Oct 18 all-day

UCI Global Scholars Early Career Fellowship

Deadline: Friday, October 18, 2019

 

Early career scholars that are doing critical interdisciplinary research on pressing global issues are encouraged to apply for a fellowship to attend the 2nd Annual UCI Global Studies Conference. The conference will be held January 31 – February 1, 2020 and will be hosted by the Department of Global & International Studies at the University of California Irvine.

The purpose of the UCI Global Scholars Early Career Fellowship is to support professionalization in the field of Global Studies, including successful publishing, by fostering quality mentorship for junior scholars.

Successful applicants will present a work in progress to a panel of distinguished scholars. Panel mentors will comment on the Fellow’s work, making suggestions intended to increase the likelihood it will be accepted for publication. Topics of discussion could include the kinds of questions being asked, relevant literature in the field, appropriate conclusions, significance of the work, avenues for further research and funding, and specific journals or publishers to which the work could be submitted.

UC Irvine will provide successful applicants with travel and lodging at the conference.

Scholars from historically underrepresented backgrounds including women, minorities, Indigenous scholars, as well as scholars from the global south, are especially encouraged to apply.

 

Submission Details

Eligibility
Early career scholars, including pre-tenure assistant professors, postdoctoral fellows, recent Ph.D. and advanced graduates (ABD), are eligible to apply.

Dates
Deadline for applications is Friday, October 18, 2019.

Requirements

  1. Online Application
  2. Curriculum Vitae
  3. Article or book chapter in progress with abstract*
  4. A one-page research statement
  5. One copy of student’s transcript (student applicants only)
  6. Letter of Recommendation (the name of one recommender who is well acquainted with your academic work)

* Applicants must submit with their application a full draft of a work in progress that they will present at the conference. The work could be a journal article or book chapter that is to be submitted for publication to a peer review journal or academic press.\

To apply please visit: https://www.globalstudies.uci.edu/conference/index.php

If you have any questions or concerns please contact Eve Darian-Smith, [email protected]

Oct
21
Mon
CFP: 2020 Southern Studies Conference at AUM
Oct 21 all-day

CFP: Southern Studies Conference, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL January 31-February 1, 2020

 

Now in its twelfth year, the Southern Studies Conference, hosted by Auburn University at Montgomery, explores themes related to the American South across a wide array of disciplines and methodologies.

Registrants to the two-day conference enjoy a variety of peer-reviewed panels, two distinguished keynote speakers, and a lecture and exhibition by a visiting artist. This coming year, the Conference includes an opening reception the evening of January 30th, a professional session oriented towards graduate student attendees, a graduate student poster session competition, and a voluntary Montgomery-based cultural outing on the afternoon of Saturday, February 1st.

The 2020 Southern Studies Conference keynote speakers and visiting artist are distinguished Southern historian Dan T. Carter, who will reflect upon the future of Southern Studies as a discipline; Jodi Skipper, Associate Professor of Anthropology & Southern Studies at University of Mississippi; and photographer Johanna Warwick, whose exhibition “The Bottom” engages with issues of race, class, urban planning, and the built environment in Baton Rouge, LA.

The 2020 Conference Committee invites proposals for pre-formed 90-minute panels or individual twenty- minute academic papers or creative presentations on any aspect of Southern Studies (broadly defined), including those relating to the fields of anthropology, geography, art history, history, literature, theater, music, communications, political science, economics, and sociology. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Southern Economies
  • Southern food studies
  • Pedagogy and the teaching of Southern topics
  • Canonicity and the South
  • Slavery and the American South
  • Civil War narratives
  • Southern archives, museums, and collections
  • Civil Rights narratives
  • Southern Geographies
  • Explorations of race and conflict in the South
  • Religion in the South
  • Southern literature
  • History of science or medicine in the South
  • Southern arts (in any medium or genre)
  • Southern architecture
  • Explorations of the Southern worker
  • Southern politics
  • Anthropological studies of the South
  • Sociological studies of the South
  • Southern music
  • Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
  • Native American topics of the South
  • Stories of immigration/migration and border- crossings
  • Contemporary re/mis-conceptions of “The South”
  • Presentations by artists/performers/writers working in the South/making work about the South

Proposals can be emailed to [email protected] Please submit a 250-word abstract and a 2-page cv for an individual twenty-minute academic paper or creative presentation proposal. Pre-formed 90-minute panel applications should include a 250-word description of the panel, list of speakers and chair/respondent, if applicable, and individual 2-page cvs for each participant.

The deadline for submission is Monday, October 21, 2019. Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend, if accepted. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by November 2019. For more information, visit the conference website, or contact Naomi Slipp, Conference Director and Assistant Professor of Art History, Auburn University at Montgomery: [email protected]

Oct
25
Fri
Chronicity and Crisis: Time in the Medical Humanities
Oct 25 – Oct 26 all-day

The Montclair State University Medical Humanities Program and the Waiting Times Research Group are pleased to sponsor “Chronicity and Crisis: Time in the Medical Humanities”

 

Montclair State University in Montclair, New Jersey
October 25–26, 2019

To register: please click here

 

Keynote Speakers

Dr. Mark Solms
Chair, Neuropsychology, University of Cape Town & Groote Schuur Hospital
Title: “A Man Who Got Lost in Time:  Feeling and Uncertainty in the Face of Oblivion”

Dr. Rishi Goyal
Director, Medicine, Literature and Society Program, Columbia University
Title: “Crisis, Catastrophe and Emergency: Disentangling Temporal Patterns of Care and Response”

 

The conference will bring together scholars from the humanities and social sciences as well as the psychosocial disciplines, health studies, and biomedicine to examine how the concepts of chronicity and crisis inform historical and contemporary understandings of health, illness and well-being. “Chronicity and Crisis” aims to open up the relationship between the long term and the urgent in order to address a range of questions in individual, social and global health.

The temporal aligning of care and illness — the potentially long time-frames of care as juxtaposed to the urgency of acute interventions — factors into the success of diverse medical treatments.  From the prioritization of wait times in emergency centers to approvals by insurance companies and the monitoring of chronic physical and mental illnesses, care is determined by more than the treatment at hand.  Likewise, adverse public health outcomes arise from social inequities and inequalities of long historical duration, including the chronic legacies of colonial violence, the inaccessibility of public spaces for the less abled, the health risks of environmental neglect, or gender imbalances in the subjects of medical research. The narrative markers of onset, frequency, and remission inform how the experiences of sudden and chronic illnesses are communicated, from self-reporting and clinical records to medical fiction, biography, and memoir.

The conference is accessible and open to the public.

Please contact Jefferson Gatrall for assistance with registration.

Nov
1
Fri
2020-2021 Institute for Advanced Study Fellowships
Nov 1 all-day

Each year, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, invites around 25 scholars to be in residence for the full academic year to pursue their own research. The School welcomes applications in economics, political science, law, psychology, sociology and anthropology. It encourages social scientific work with an historical and humanistic bent and also entertains applications in history, philosophy, literary criticism, literature and linguistics. Applicants must have a Ph.D. at time of application. Each year there is a general thematic focus that provides common ground for roughly half the scholars; for 2020-2021 the focus will be “Science and the State.” The application deadline is November 1, 2019. Applications must be submitted through the Institute’s online application system, which opens June 1 and can be found, along with more information about the theme, at www.sss.ias.edu/applications.

Modern science and the modern state are inextricable and co-emergent. Indeed, the rise of the state form has been accomplished through the ways of knowing and extracting that scientific analysis makes possible—including classification, hierarchization, quantification, and reductionism. But while the production of science and the formation of the state are relatively well studied, much remains to be understood about the relationships between the two—how states support, use, and regulate sciences, and how the sciences support the structure, function, and legitimacy of states.

What have been the historical processes involved in the intertwined development of states and sciences, and how much have they varied across national contexts? While the state remains the driver of both private and public sector technoscience in certain societies, what has its role become in many others, where scientific innovation is increasingly seen as the purview of the private sector? As we today face issues and crises, from human gene-editing to climate change, that supersede provincial  boundaries—even  as  forms  of  violence and social control enabled by science continue to be operationalized by nation-states— what forms of transnational oversight may be required? How might state engagement with the natural and social sciences, such as the use of “nudge units” and “evidence- based” claims in legislation and governance, necessitate new understandings of the relationship between states and sciences? How does the corporate world respond to increasing demands  from both the state and citizens for social responsibility and ethical practice with regard to science and technology? These are some  of  the  questions  that will be addressed by the various disciplines of the social sciences and humanities.

Applications from scholars working outside the theme are also encouraged.

The program will be led by

Alondra Nelson, Harold F. Linder Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in collaboration with

Didier Fassin, James D. Wolfensohn Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study

Nov
4
Mon
SAR 2020-2021 Resident Scholar Fellowships
Nov 4 all-day

The School for Advanced Research is currently accepting applications for the 2020-2021 Resident Scholar fellowships term

 

Nine-month Resident Scholar Fellowships are awarded to scholars who have completed their research and analysis in the social sciences, humanities, Latino/a Studies, and Native Studies and who need time to reflect, debate, and write. Fellowships are awarded annually by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to five or six scholars who have completed their research and who need time to prepare manuscripts or dissertations on topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from the perspective of anthropology or from related fields such as history and sociology. Scholars from the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to apply.

The tenure runs from 9/1/20 to 5/31/21 and includes a stipend and low-cost housing.

The deadline for application is November 4, 2019.

For more information, please visit scholar.sarweb.org.

Nov
7
Thu
Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting @ Bloomington, Indiana
Nov 7 – Nov 10 all-day

Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting – Bloomington, IN, Nov 7-10, 2019

The Society for Ethnomusicology will hold its 64th Annual Meeting on November 7-10, 2019, at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The meeting will be hosted by Indiana University in conjunction with the IU Bicentennial (1820-2020). For the Call for Proposals, abstract submission instructions, and preliminary meeting information, please visit the SEM 2019 area of the SEM website (www.ethnomusicology.org).

In conjunction with the SEM Annual Meeting, two concurrent pre-conference symposia will be presented on November 6: “Film as Ethnography, Activism, and Public Work in Ethnomusicology” and “Heritage and the Politics of Inclusion in Latin American Brass Bands.”

Visit the conference website for more information about the Annual Meeting, pre-conference symposia, online registration, and hotel accommodations.