Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected]ananthro.org.

 

Oct
18
Fri
UCI Global Scholars Early Career Fellowship
Oct 18 all-day

UCI Global Scholars Early Career Fellowship

Deadline: Friday, October 18, 2019

 

Early career scholars that are doing critical interdisciplinary research on pressing global issues are encouraged to apply for a fellowship to attend the 2nd Annual UCI Global Studies Conference. The conference will be held January 31 – February 1, 2020 and will be hosted by the Department of Global & International Studies at the University of California Irvine.

The purpose of the UCI Global Scholars Early Career Fellowship is to support professionalization in the field of Global Studies, including successful publishing, by fostering quality mentorship for junior scholars.

Successful applicants will present a work in progress to a panel of distinguished scholars. Panel mentors will comment on the Fellow’s work, making suggestions intended to increase the likelihood it will be accepted for publication. Topics of discussion could include the kinds of questions being asked, relevant literature in the field, appropriate conclusions, significance of the work, avenues for further research and funding, and specific journals or publishers to which the work could be submitted.

UC Irvine will provide successful applicants with travel and lodging at the conference.

Scholars from historically underrepresented backgrounds including women, minorities, Indigenous scholars, as well as scholars from the global south, are especially encouraged to apply.

 

Submission Details

Eligibility
Early career scholars, including pre-tenure assistant professors, postdoctoral fellows, recent Ph.D. and advanced graduates (ABD), are eligible to apply.

Dates
Deadline for applications is Friday, October 18, 2019.

Requirements

  1. Online Application
  2. Curriculum Vitae
  3. Article or book chapter in progress with abstract*
  4. A one-page research statement
  5. One copy of student’s transcript (student applicants only)
  6. Letter of Recommendation (the name of one recommender who is well acquainted with your academic work)

* Applicants must submit with their application a full draft of a work in progress that they will present at the conference. The work could be a journal article or book chapter that is to be submitted for publication to a peer review journal or academic press.\

To apply please visit: https://www.globalstudies.uci.edu/conference/index.php

If you have any questions or concerns please contact Eve Darian-Smith, [email protected]

Oct
21
Mon
CFP: 2020 Southern Studies Conference at AUM
Oct 21 all-day

CFP: Southern Studies Conference, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL January 31-February 1, 2020

 

Now in its twelfth year, the Southern Studies Conference, hosted by Auburn University at Montgomery, explores themes related to the American South across a wide array of disciplines and methodologies.

Registrants to the two-day conference enjoy a variety of peer-reviewed panels, two distinguished keynote speakers, and a lecture and exhibition by a visiting artist. This coming year, the Conference includes an opening reception the evening of January 30th, a professional session oriented towards graduate student attendees, a graduate student poster session competition, and a voluntary Montgomery-based cultural outing on the afternoon of Saturday, February 1st.

The 2020 Southern Studies Conference keynote speakers and visiting artist are distinguished Southern historian Dan T. Carter, who will reflect upon the future of Southern Studies as a discipline; Jodi Skipper, Associate Professor of Anthropology & Southern Studies at University of Mississippi; and photographer Johanna Warwick, whose exhibition “The Bottom” engages with issues of race, class, urban planning, and the built environment in Baton Rouge, LA.

The 2020 Conference Committee invites proposals for pre-formed 90-minute panels or individual twenty- minute academic papers or creative presentations on any aspect of Southern Studies (broadly defined), including those relating to the fields of anthropology, geography, art history, history, literature, theater, music, communications, political science, economics, and sociology. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Southern Economies
  • Southern food studies
  • Pedagogy and the teaching of Southern topics
  • Canonicity and the South
  • Slavery and the American South
  • Civil War narratives
  • Southern archives, museums, and collections
  • Civil Rights narratives
  • Southern Geographies
  • Explorations of race and conflict in the South
  • Religion in the South
  • Southern literature
  • History of science or medicine in the South
  • Southern arts (in any medium or genre)
  • Southern architecture
  • Explorations of the Southern worker
  • Southern politics
  • Anthropological studies of the South
  • Sociological studies of the South
  • Southern music
  • Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
  • Native American topics of the South
  • Stories of immigration/migration and border- crossings
  • Contemporary re/mis-conceptions of “The South”
  • Presentations by artists/performers/writers working in the South/making work about the South

Proposals can be emailed to [email protected] Please submit a 250-word abstract and a 2-page cv for an individual twenty-minute academic paper or creative presentation proposal. Pre-formed 90-minute panel applications should include a 250-word description of the panel, list of speakers and chair/respondent, if applicable, and individual 2-page cvs for each participant.

The deadline for submission is Monday, October 21, 2019. Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend, if accepted. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by November 2019. For more information, visit the conference website, or contact Naomi Slipp, Conference Director and Assistant Professor of Art History, Auburn University at Montgomery: [email protected]

Oct
31
Thu
2020 ASCSA National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships 
Oct 31 all-day

ASCSA National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships 

DeadlineOctober 31, 2019

 

Founded in 1881, the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) is the most significant resource in Greece for American scholars in the fields of Greek language, literature, history, archaeology, philosophy, and art, from pre-Hellenic times to the present. It offers two major research libraries: the Blegen, with over 113,000 volumes dedicated to the ancient Mediterranean world; and the Gennadius, with over 146,000 volumes and archives devoted to post-classical Hellenic civilization and, more broadly, the Balkans and the eastern Mediterranean. The School also provides centers for advanced research in archaeological and related topics at its excavations in the Athenian Agora and Corinth, and houses an archaeological sciences laboratory at the main campus in Athens. By agreement with the Greek government, the ASCSA is authorized to serve as liaison with the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports on behalf of American students and scholars for the acquisition of permits to conduct archaeological work and to study collections.

Since its inception in 1994, the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowship program at the ASCSA has demonstrated its effectiveness by supporting projects for 60 scholars with distinguished research and teaching careers in the humanities.

Eligibility:  Postdoctoral scholars and professionals in all fields relevant to the mission of the ASCSA who are US citizens, or foreign nationals who have lived in the US for the three years immediately preceding the application deadline. Applicants must already hold their Ph.D. or have completed all requirements, except for the actual conferral of the degree, by the application deadline.

Terms:  Two to four fellows will be selected for awards of 4, 5, or 9 months duration. The monthly stipend per fellow is $4,200 allocated from a total pool of $75,600 per year. Applicants should indicate their preference for the length and dates of tenure of the award to coincide with the American School’s academic year: 9 months, Sept. 2020-beginning of June 2021; 4 months, Sept. – Dec.; 5 months, January to the beginning of June. School fees are waived, and the award provides lunches at Loring Hall five days per week. The NEH Fellow will pay for travel costs, housing, residence permit, and other living expenses from the stipend. A final report is due at the end of the award period, and the ASCSA expects that copies of all publications that result from research conducted as a Fellow of the ASCSA will be contributed to the relevant library of the School. The NEH Fellow is also required to send one copy of all books and electronic copies of articles directly to the NEH.

NEH Fellows should use the American School of Classical Studies at Athens as their primary research base, but research may be carried out throughout Greece.

Application: Submit Senior “Associate Membership with Fellowship” Application online on the ASCSA web site by October 31. Link to application: https://ascsa.submittable.com/submit/115299/associate-membership-with-fellowship-application

The following items should be included in the application submitted online on the ASCSA web site:

  1.  Short abstract of the project (up to 300 words).
  2.   A statement of the project (up to five pages, single spaced), including desired number of months in Greece, a timetable, explicit goals, a selected bibliography, the importance of the work, the methodologies involved (where applicable), and the reasons it should occur at the ASCSA.
  3. Current curriculum vitae.  If not a US citizen, state US visa status /date of residence.
  4. Names of three recommenders who are individuals familiar with applicant’s work and field of interest. Include a list of names, positions, and addresses of the referees.  Instructions for recommenders to submit letters will be sent through the application portal. Please make sure your recommenders have submitted their letters by November 4. These letters should comment on the feasibility of the project and the applicant’s ability to carry it out successfully.

The following criteria will be used by the Selection Committee when considering applications.

  1. Are the objectives and approaches clearly stated and coherent?
  2. Will the project result in an important and original contribution?
  3. Are the research perspectives and methodologies appropriate?
  4. Is the projected timetable reasonable for the tenure of the fellowship?
  5. What resources are necessary? Does the ASCSA provide resources that are not available at the home institution?
  6.  Will residence in Greece contribute substantially to the success of the project?

Web site: www.ascsa.edu.gr or https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/apply/fellowships-and-grants/postdoctoral-and-senior-scholars
E-mail: [email protected]

The awards will be announced during February. Awardees will be expected to accept the award within two weeks of notification of funding, but no later than March 1.

Nov
1
Fri
2020 Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research
Nov 1 all-day

Lewis and Clark Fund for Exploration and Field Research


Scope
The Lewis and Clark Fund encourages exploratory field studies for the collection of specimens and data and to provide the imaginative stimulus that accompanies direct observation. Applications are invited from disciplines with a large dependence on field studies, such as archaeology, anthropology, biology, ecology, geography, geology, linguistics, and paleontology, but grants will not be restricted to these fields.

Eligibility
Grants will be available to doctoral students who wish to participate in field studies for their dissertations or for other purposes. Master’s candidates, undergraduates, and postdoctoral fellows are not eligible.

Award
Grants will depend on travel costs but will ordinarily be in the range of several hundred dollars to about $5,000.

Deadline
November 1 (letters of support due October 30); notification in early April.

Contact 

Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, American Philosophical Society, 104 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106; (215) 440-3429; [email protected].

Website

https://www.amphilsoc.org/grants/lewis-and-clark-fund-exploration-and-field-research (for information and access to application portal)

2020-2021 Institute for Advanced Study Fellowships
Nov 1 all-day

Each year, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, invites around 25 scholars to be in residence for the full academic year to pursue their own research. The School welcomes applications in economics, political science, law, psychology, sociology and anthropology. It encourages social scientific work with an historical and humanistic bent and also entertains applications in history, philosophy, literary criticism, literature and linguistics. Applicants must have a Ph.D. at time of application. Each year there is a general thematic focus that provides common ground for roughly half the scholars; for 2020-2021 the focus will be “Science and the State.” The application deadline is November 1, 2019. Applications must be submitted through the Institute’s online application system, which opens June 1 and can be found, along with more information about the theme, at www.sss.ias.edu/applications.

Modern science and the modern state are inextricable and co-emergent. Indeed, the rise of the state form has been accomplished through the ways of knowing and extracting that scientific analysis makes possible—including classification, hierarchization, quantification, and reductionism. But while the production of science and the formation of the state are relatively well studied, much remains to be understood about the relationships between the two—how states support, use, and regulate sciences, and how the sciences support the structure, function, and legitimacy of states.

What have been the historical processes involved in the intertwined development of states and sciences, and how much have they varied across national contexts? While the state remains the driver of both private and public sector technoscience in certain societies, what has its role become in many others, where scientific innovation is increasingly seen as the purview of the private sector? As we today face issues and crises, from human gene-editing to climate change, that supersede provincial  boundaries—even  as  forms  of  violence and social control enabled by science continue to be operationalized by nation-states— what forms of transnational oversight may be required? How might state engagement with the natural and social sciences, such as the use of “nudge units” and “evidence- based” claims in legislation and governance, necessitate new understandings of the relationship between states and sciences? How does the corporate world respond to increasing demands  from both the state and citizens for social responsibility and ethical practice with regard to science and technology? These are some  of  the  questions  that will be addressed by the various disciplines of the social sciences and humanities.

Applications from scholars working outside the theme are also encouraged.

The program will be led by

Alondra Nelson, Harold F. Linder Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in collaboration with

Didier Fassin, James D. Wolfensohn Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study

Embodiment and literacies: Teaching, learning, and becoming in a post- world CFP
Nov 1 all-day

Special issue call for papers from English Teaching: Practice & Critique

Special Issue of English Teaching: Practice and Critique

Embodiment and literacies: Teaching, learning, and becoming in a post- world
Guest Editors: Stavroula Kontovourki, Elisabeth Johnson, Grace Enriquez

In recent years, there has been a surge in literacy studies research that transgresses views of literacy as a set of skills or socially situated meaning-making practices to reconfigure meaning making at the intersection of human subjects and materials. Following broader trends in the social and humanist sciences, such ontological, epistemological, and axiological reconfigurations rework notions of agency, politics, and ethics (e.g., Barad, 2003; Davies et al., 2013; Lather & St. Pierre, 2013; St. Pierre, 2014). This re-theorization has been instantiated in the renaming of literacies as im/material (Burnett et al., 2014), post-human (Kuby & Rowsell, 2017), and trans- (Stornaiuolo, Smith, & Phillips, 2017). Across such work, we see a concern with flows, emergences, difference, and potential: flows of affect and cognition and in connected space-times, entanglements of humans and nonhumans, unexpected encounters and meaning-making practices, transgressions and possibilities of/for new matterings and becomings (e.g., Boldt & Leander, 2017, Ehret, Hollet, & Jocius, 2016; Leander & Ehret, 2019; Marsh, 2017). These post-era trends emphasize how meanings of literacy and learners’ identities flow in connected space-times, where humans and nonhumans are entangled and unexpectedly encountered. These flows, entanglements, and encounters make new ways of mattering and being possible.

Within this broader move, we see much value in understanding literacy as embodied, (i.e., as of material bodies, subjective feelings, and produced identities, interacting across non-human materials, spaces and times, while risking and affirming recognition). This understanding invites researchers and educators to examine different ways bodies matter in literacy teaching and learning; to wonder how literate bodies (of educators and learners) are simultaneously disciplined and disciplining; feeling and affective; impossible to represent but also possible to present anew; and thus, mobile and indeterminate (Johnson & Kontovourki, 2016). In effect, one is invited to consider literate bodies as not only acting and feeling objects, but also as sites where humans, materials, and ideas entangle to make up particular meanings of literacy, of pedagogy, and of people.

Focusing on literacy pedagogies, we invite submissions that foreground bodies and incorporate premises of different post- theories to engage with questions like:

  1. Whose bodies are recognized as relevant (or not) at different pedagogical moments? How are recognitions tied to norms that circulate social relations and ways teachers and students mis/recognize their roles in defining what matters as literacy?
  2. What feelings and emotions circulate at the entanglement of bodies, texts, and objects, illuminating spaces of control and possibility? How can emergent difference and transformation speak back to structures like schooling? In what moments can this newness even be paradoxical, violent, and potentially inequitable?
  3. What kinds of meaning-making occur as students disrupt expectations or teachers follow the lead of students or materials? How do unexpected engagements across bodies and materials help us re-imagine literacy in school and other institutional spaces?

Considering the embodiment of literacy in these terms constitutes an ethico-political project of tracing the boundaries of literacies and literacy pedagogies in a post- world. Maintaining the focus on criticality, this special issue aims to contribute to the art of the im/possible by showcasing examples of practice where both possibility and constriction, paradoxes of newness and difference, inclusion and exclusion emerge.

Submission Details
Submissions for this Special Issue must be made through the ScholarOne online submission and peer review system. Please refer to the ETPC Author Guidelines for guidelines on submissions, including word limits. For inquiries on the special issue, you may contact Stavroula Kontovourki ([email protected]), Elisabeth Johnson ([email protected]), or Grace Enriquez ([email protected]).

Submission date: November 1, 2019

Nov
4
Mon
SAR 2020-2021 Resident Scholar Fellowships
Nov 4 all-day

The School for Advanced Research is currently accepting applications for the 2020-2021 Resident Scholar fellowships term

 

Nine-month Resident Scholar Fellowships are awarded to scholars who have completed their research and analysis in the social sciences, humanities, Latino/a Studies, and Native Studies and who need time to reflect, debate, and write. Fellowships are awarded annually by the School for Advanced Research (SAR) to five or six scholars who have completed their research and who need time to prepare manuscripts or dissertations on topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from the perspective of anthropology or from related fields such as history and sociology. Scholars from the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to apply.

The tenure runs from 9/1/20 to 5/31/21 and includes a stipend and low-cost housing.

The deadline for application is November 4, 2019.

For more information, please visit scholar.sarweb.org.

Nov
6
Wed
CFP: Cinema and the City: Interdisciplinary Perspectives
Nov 6 all-day

Call for Papers
Cinema and the City: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

International Conference
November 29-30, 2019

University of Palermo, Department of Architecture, viale delle Scienze
Room 1.3 and 1.4, Main Building

Deadline for proposals: November 6, 2019

 

The conference aims to explore the relationships established between cinema and urban areas. We want to stress the connections woven between cities and cinema, films, fiction and documentaries – important unconventional sources for the understanding of social and cultural contexts. We intend to focus on the modalities used in films to tell stories – through images and speech – concerning cities, territories, and places, residents’ lives in relation to spaces, to buildings, to landscapes, as well as to its urban culture as a whole. The perspective we have chosen for this conference is interdisciplinary and cinema will be considered as a medium to be understood and interpreted in several, possibly comparative, ways. Actually, cinema, as a specific cultural artefact, expresses both individual and collective viewpoints mirroring cultures and hybridizations that can be explored by various disciplines and comparative perspectives. This complexity, possible reflection of the contemporary world, is perhaps more tangible in cinema than in other expressive forms, making it accessible to many people and at the same time a medium in which several genres and contents meet and can be analysed and compared. We are particularly interested in comparative perspectives and interdisciplinary viewpoints. As a result, the conference aims to engage researchers from different countries and various fields of study in order to explore the multiple ways through which cinema is able to contain and manifest crucial aspects of cities and urban spaces. Anthropologists, architects, urban planners, geographers, sociologists, film critics, semioticians, scholars of aesthetics, of images, of cultural studies, as well as film directors, documentary film makers and designers are invited to share their experiences and their ideas. We intend to collect the articles and publish them in a collective volume.

 

The Committee welcomes papers on any-related topic. Suggested topics may include:

 

  • Cultural and social exchanges and/or conflicts between cultures, people and places
  • Cultural hybridizations
  • Urban spaces: the concrete building
  • Urban spaces: the symbolic building
  • Urban spaces: beauty
  • Urban spaces: transformation
  • Urban spaces: relationships between people
  • Living, moving, dwelling
  • Urban economy and the real estate market
  • Urban rituals
  • Visual imaginaries
  • Cities and comics
  • Film photography and urban spaces
  • Food and cities
  • Politics, cinema and cities
  • Ghettoes and cities as “prisons”
  • Urban distress and marginalization, inclusion and exclusion
  • Transforming urban spaces
  • Centres, suburbs, gentrification
  • Cities and dreams
  • Urban biographies: telling the city
  • Everyday life and urban infrastructures
  • Domestic spaces and cities
  • Identity and urban configurations
  • Old and new methodologies of analysis
  • Imaginary horizons and cities
  • Perception, interaction and urban spaces
  • Urban Resilience/Resistance

 

Scientific Coordinators

Flavia Schiavo and Stefano Montes

 

Organizing committee

Flavia Schiavo, Stefano Montes, Leonardo Mercatanti, Federico Montanari, Alessandro Prato, Gaetano Sabato, Giusi Coppola, Massimo Bonura, Alessio Arena

 

Administrative organisation

Department of Architecture, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze 90128, Palermo

 

Proposals  and information should be sent to:

Flavia Schiavo ([email protected]) and Stefano Montes ([email protected])

 

Deadline for proposals and biodata: November 6, 2019

Proposal abstract and title: max 250 words

Time for speech: 20 minutes

Languages used in the conferences: Italian, English, French and Spanish

 

Participation is free, travelling, accommodation and meals are covered by participants.

Nov
7
Thu
Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting @ Bloomington, Indiana
Nov 7 – Nov 10 all-day

Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting – Bloomington, IN, Nov 7-10, 2019

The Society for Ethnomusicology will hold its 64th Annual Meeting on November 7-10, 2019, at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The meeting will be hosted by Indiana University in conjunction with the IU Bicentennial (1820-2020). For the Call for Proposals, abstract submission instructions, and preliminary meeting information, please visit the SEM 2019 area of the SEM website (www.ethnomusicology.org).

In conjunction with the SEM Annual Meeting, two concurrent pre-conference symposia will be presented on November 6: “Film as Ethnography, Activism, and Public Work in Ethnomusicology” and “Heritage and the Politics of Inclusion in Latin American Brass Bands.”

Visit the conference website for more information about the Annual Meeting, pre-conference symposia, online registration, and hotel accommodations.

Dec
2
Mon
2020 Franklin Research Grants
Dec 2 all-day

Franklin Research Grants

Scope
This program of small grants to scholars is intended to support the cost of research leading to publication in all areas of knowledge. The Franklin program is particularly designed to help meet the cost of travel to libraries and archives for research purposes; the purchase of microfilm, photocopies or equivalent research materials; the costs associated with fieldwork; or laboratory research expenses.

Eligibility
Applicants are expected to have a doctorate or to have published work of doctoral character and quality. Ph.D. candidates are not eligible to apply, but the Society is especially interested in supporting the work of young scholars who have recently received the doctorate.

Award
From $1,000 to $6,000.

Deadlines
October 1, December 2; notification in January and March.

Contact 

Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, American Philosophical Society, 104 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106; (215) 440-3429; [email protected].

Website

https://www.amphilsoc.org/grants/franklin-research-grants (for information and access to application portal)