Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jan
8
Wed
2019-20 ACLS Fellowship and Grant Competitions
Jan 8 all-day

The 2019-20 ACLS competitions are now open for programs with fall deadlines. ACLS offers fellowship and grant programs that promote research across the full spectrum of humanities and humanistic social science fields and support scholars from the advanced graduate student level through all stages of the academic career. Comprehensive information and eligibility criteria for all programs can be found at https://www.acls.org/Fellowship-and-Grant-Programs/Competitions-and-Deadlines.

Application deadlines vary by program:

September 25, 2019, 9pm EDT 
*ACLS Fellowships (the central program, which includes several named awards and Project Development Grants)
*Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowships for Recently Tenured Scholars (including opportunities specifically for liberal arts college faculty)
*Mellon/ACLS Community College Faculty Fellowships

October 23, 2019, 9pm EDT
*Getty/ACLS Postdoctoral Fellowships in the History of Art
*Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art
*Luce/ACLS Program in Religion, Journalism & International Affairs – Fellowships for Scholars
*Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships
*Mellon/ACLS Scholars & Society Fellowships

November 6, 2019, 9pm EST 
*Luce/ACLS Predissertation Travel Grants to China
*Luce/ACLS Early Career Fellowships in China Studies
*Luce/ACLS Collaborative Reading-Workshop Grants in China Studies
*Comparative Perspectives on Chinese Culture and Society (grants for planning meetings, workshops, and conferences) – pending renewal of funding

November 13, 2019, 9pm EST
*The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Dissertation Fellowships in Buddhist Studies
*The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowships in Buddhist Studies
*The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Research Fellowships in Buddhist Studies
*The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Grants for Critical Editions and Scholarly Translations
*Luce/ACLS Program in Religion, Journalism & International Affairs – Collaborative Programming Grants

November 20, 2019, 9pm GMT
*African Humanities Program Postdoctoral Fellowships

January 8, 2020, 9pm EST
*ACLS Digital Extension Grants
*The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation New Professorships in Buddhist Studies

Jan
13
Mon
CFP: #ALT-MKE Conference
Jan 13 all-day

The Center for 21st Century Studies, UW-Milwaukee

The Center for 21st Century Studies and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee will host this year’s annual conference, “#ALT-MKE” on April 30-May 2, 2020. Confirmed plenary speakers for the conference are: Dasha Kelly Hamilton (Wisconsin’s Poet Laureate), Brian Larkin (Barnard College/Columbia University), Monique Liston (Ubuntu Research), Rick Lowe(University of Houston), AbdouMaliq Simone (University of Sheffield) and Fatima El-Tayeb (University of California, San Diego).

Please refer to a description of the conference theme and the call for proposals below.

 

Conference Description

In July 2020, the City of Milwaukee will host the Democratic National Convention where leaders will gather to nominate a presidential candidate and to ratify a platform with national and global agendas. The DNC chose Milwaukee because it sees Wisconsin as emblematic of the key Midwestern and post-industrial states that the Democrats must win to retake the presidency. In turn, Milwaukee sought to host the Democratic Convention as an opportunity to remake its image as a thriving, multicultural city.

During the DNC, predictable narratives will be trotted out about Milwaukee: of segregation, crime, poverty, and blight, alongside those championing a resurgent economy and new forms of capitalist urban development. The DNC marks a supposedly transformational moment from which new solutions will emerge. But the narratives of blight and rebirth–articulated not only by political leaders but often by academics as well–often reify what they are intended to counteract. The spectacle of the DNC and of its capitalist solutions mask a panoply of more ordinary efforts underway all around us, as movements, activists, and everyday people demand new ways of seeing, organizing, and acting in the world to address the overwhelming crises of the day. Indeed, Milwaukee is like many cities in the US: a babel of ecological, social, and political perspectives, a metropolis at a crossroads of critical thinking, and a place of promise and failure.

UWM’s Center for 21st Century Studies explores these multiple perspectives in its spring 2020 conference, “#ALT-MKE: Finding New Answers in the 21st Century City.”  At this critical juncture, we must rethink our political imaginations and critical engagements. Can Milwaukee, and other urban areas like it, offer novel answers to the intractable problems that confront us?  If the city is an answer, what questions must we ask?

#ALT-MKE will highlight how the temporality and space of the ordinary city offers new epistemologies and practices that are engaged in the global struggle to combat racialized disinvestment, a fractured body politic, ecological crisis, and urban abandonment. The spectacles offered by the DNC–whether political, mediated, or financial in nature–lead only to institutional inaction and failure, wherein lie opportunities for ongoing forms of resistance to find new and stronger footings.

From the Situationists and Russian Constructivists, to suffragists, tactical urbanists, the Movement for Black Lives, and the Occupy movement, people have always imagined and sought new ways of life to challenge oppressive structures and violent erasure. Under the increasingly dire pressures of climate crisis, racial capitalism, ongoing settler displacement, destructive national politics, and crushing inequality, the time has come to reclaim our future by reframing these issues through the refocused lens of the 21st century city.

At the core of this investigation is our focus on reframing cities as political and ideological acts that hold within them normative values of aesthetics, power/resistance, public life, and citizenship. By inviting explorations of critical, decolonial, anti-racist politics, this conference hopes to bring together new forms of analysis, methods of urban historiography, organizing, and engaged forms of scholarship.

The conference seeks to highlight the undercommons and the counternarratives fomented in the ordinary life of spaces and places. We will ask how contested knowledges and stories of a city may be experienced across different and intersecting power relations that organize bodies and space. We hope that accounts of everyday practices, local knowledges, and organizing will help illuminate how urban residents resist, adapt and reformat conventional structures of power, governance, and order. We do not expect to find a single solution, but to foster a variety of grounded strategies and projects that we aim to highlight, bring together, and learn from.

 

Call for Proposals

We seek proposals for 15-20 minute presentations which could address any of the following topics:

  • Racial capitalism
  • Climate, ecology, water justice, and cities
  • Urban culture/urbanities
  • Water and land issues, particularly as they pertain to indigenous rights
  • Historiography of the city, historiography of urban political, social, or activist movements
  • Artistic practices and urban space
  • New ways to read and interpret cities—epistemologies of the urban
  • The dynamics of race, class, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality in urban spaces
  • Narratives of cities, urban crime, and/or segregation (in literature, film, or other media)
  • Indigenous knowledges and practices
  • Local foodways and agricultural practices
  • Urban design and sustainability (including transportation)
  • Settler colonialism and decolonizing cities
  • Cities and biopolitics/biopower
  • The urban in relation to the suburban/exurban

Please send your abstract (up to 250 words) and a brief (1-page) CV in one PDF document by Monday, January 13, 2020 to Richard Grusin, Director, Center for 21st Century Studies, at [email protected].

Jan
31
Fri
Brandeis Israel Studies Fellowships
Jan 31 all-day

Faculty Fellowship: The Summer Institute for Israel Studies 

June 10–21, 2020 at Brandeis and June 22–July 1, 2020 in Israel

Apply now for this competitive fellowship. Created to address the need for serious and nuanced study of Israel in the academy, the Summer Institute for Israel Studies is a rigorous program that equips faculty members to develop and teach courses about modern Israel in any discipline. Stipend of up to $2,500, plus group travel, accommodations and most meals provided. 

  • ENGAGE with world-class faculty from Israel and the U.S. in a two-week multidisciplinary Brandeis seminar.
  • MEET with leading personalities in public life, the academy and the arts on a 10-day Israel study tour.
  • EXPLORE the complexity of Israeli society, politics and culture.
  • DEVELOP or revise a syllabus to teach at your home institution.
  • JOIN a network of over 335 alumni — teaching at over 200 institutions — supported by a wealth of pedagogical resources and ongoing professional development.

Faculty teaching outside of Israel are eligible for the program. 

Apply online by January 31, 2020. Learn more at www.brandeis.edu/israel-center/siis/index.html. 

If this opportunity is not a fit for you, we invite you to nominate a colleague and to share the fellowship information with faculty members who might benefit from the program.

 

Doctoral Fellowships in Israel Studies at Brandeis University

Full and partial fellowships supporting doctoral students whose research focuses on Israel. Candidates must be accepted into Brandeis University graduate school programs of Anthropology, History, Literature, Middle East Studies, Near Eastern & Judaic Studies, Politics or Sociology. Competitive living stipend with generous health care benefits. Renewable for up to five years. Deadlines vary by department. Learn more at www.brandeis.edu/israel-center/resources/grants-fellowships/graduate-students.html

Mar
2
Mon
2020 Phillips Fund Grants for Native American Research
Mar 2 all-day

Phillips Fund Grants for Native American Research


Scope
For research in Native American linguistics and ethnohistory, focusing on the continental United States and Canada. Given for a maximum of one year from date of award to cover travel, tapes, and consultants’ fees.

Eligibility
Applicants may be graduate students pursuing either a master’s or a doctoral degree; postdoctoral applicants are also eligible.

Award
From $1,000 to $3,500.

Deadline
March 2; notification in May.

Contact 

Linda Musumeci, Director of Grants and Fellowships, American Philosophical Society, 104 South Fifth Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106; (215) 440-3429; [email protected].

Website

https://www.amphilsoc.org/grants/phillips-fund-native-american-research (information and access to the application portal).

Sep
2
Wed
COMELA 2020 @ American College of Greece, Athens, Greece
Sep 2 – Sep 5 all-day

The COMELA 2020 – The (Annual) Conference on Mediterranean and European Linguistic Anthropology 2020

American College of Greece, Athens, Greece, September 2 – 5, 2020

https://comela2020.acg.edu

Information

Following the growth of the COMELA, The Conference on Mediterranean and European Linguistic Anthropology, we announce The COMELA 2020, September 2-5, 2020, at The American College of Greece, Athens, Greece.

The COMELA seeks to redefine scholarship on Mediterranean and European Language and Society.

 

Purpose and Structure

The COMELA 2020 invites academics in the fields of Linguistics, Anthropology, Linguistic and Cultural Anthropology, and Ethnology, pertinent to The Mediterranean and Europe, to discuss work, and engage in scholarly collaborations, thus strengthening global academic networks in the field.

 

Location

American College of Greece
Athens, Greece

 

Keynote and Plenary Speakers 

Jan Blommaert – Tilburg University
Alexandra Georgakopoulou – King’s College London
Dimitris Dalakoglou – Vrije University Amsterdam

Partners

  • Taylor and Francis Global Publishers (Official Publishing Partner)
  • 120 major academic institutions globally
  • Scientific Committee of over 120 academics

Publications

Journal Special Issues, and Monographs, from papers submitted that meet publication requirements. Papers selected will be published with Top-Tier journals. Here, ample assistance will be provided to revise manuscripts.

All COMELA Conference proceedings will be SCOPUS published.

 

Dates

Abstract and poster proposal submission – June 1, 2019 – November 15, 2019

Notification of acceptance – No later than December 30, 2019 (for those submitted prior to this)

Registration

  • Early bird – October 30, 2019 – January 21, 2020
  • Normal bird – January 22, 2020 – April 25, 2020
    • Presenters must register by April 25, 2020, to guarantee a place in the program. Registration will remain open after this, but conference organizers cannot guarantee placement in the conference.
  • Late bird – April 26, 2020 – September 5, 2020 (Conference end)

 

Conference dates

Wednesday September 2, 2020 – Saturday September 5, 2020

Final day comprises optional Anthropological excursion (separate cost)

 

Abstract submissions

The Call for Abstracts opens on June 1, 2019, at https://comela2020.acg.edu, which contains all information

 

Anthropological Excursion

Several options
Attica, Greece

 

Theme

Bounded Languages … Unbounded

Politics of identity are central to language change. Here, linguistic boundaries rise and fall, motivating the ephemeral characteristics of language communities. The Mediterranean and European region is one replete with histories, with power struggles, uniquely demarcating nation, ethnicity, and community. For this, cultural and political identities, language ideologies, as well as the languages themselves, have sought boundedness, dynamics of which have indeed sought change over eons, through demographic movements, through geopolitics, through technological innovation. In a current era of technological advancement, transnational fluidity, intellectual power, capitalism, and new sexualities, then, we question, once again, the boundedness of language and identity, and ways in which to unbound languages and ideologies. More than before, we now increasingly pursue anthropological toil, so to innovate ways to locate these ideologies and their fluid boundaries, actively. We now need to increasingly unbind these languages, and their ideologies, so to arrive at progressive realizations, and to rectify, or at least see and move past, the segregations of old.

The COMELA 2020 theme, “Bounded languages… Unbounded”, encapsulates the ongoing struggle throughout Mediterranean and European regions. As the continuous tension between demarcation, and the concurrent legitimization, of languages, language ideologies, and language identities, enters an era where new modes of interactivity require language communities to take on roles super-ordinate to the past, flexible citizenship now operates within, and not only across, language communities, to unbind languages, and to create new boundaries, unlike those ever seen throughout history.

The COMELA 2020 invites work which addresses the shifting boundedness of Language Communities of the Mediterranean and Europe. Papers and posters should acknowledge and describe processes of language shape, change, and ideology, pertinent to social, cultural, political histories, and futures of Mediterranean and European regions, and by those working in Mediterranean and European regions.

 

Strands

Abstract and poster proposals should address one or more of the key strands related to Mediterranean and European countries and regions:

  • Anthropological Linguistics
  • Applied Sociolinguistics
  • Buddhist studies and discourses
  • Cognitive Anthropology and Language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Ethnographical Language Work
  • Ethnography of Communication
  • General Sociolinguistics
  • Islamic Studies and discourses
  • Language, Community, Ethnicity
  • Language Contact and Change
  • Language, Dialect, Sociolect, Genre
  • Language Documentation
  • Language, Gender, Sexuality
  • Language Ideologies
  • Language Minorities and Majorities
  • Language Revitalization
  • Language in Real and Virtual Spaces
  • Language Socialization
  • Language and Spatiotemporal Frames
  • Multi functionality
  • Narrative and Meta narrative
  • Nonverbal Semiotics
  • Poetics
  • Post-Structuralism and Language
  • Semiotics and Semiology
  • Social Psychology of Language
  • Text, Context, Entextualization

 

Presentation lengths

  • Colloquia – 1.5 hours with 3-5 contributors (Parts A and B are possible, thus 6-10 contributors)
  • General paper sessions – Approx. 20-25 minutes each, including 5 mins for questions/responses
  • Posters – to be displayed at designated times throughout the COMELA 2020

 

Submission Guidelines (via the online submission website, or by email (see below))

General session papers

  • 18-word maximum title
  • 400-word maximum abstract, including references

Colloquia

  • Submission of only the main abstract for colloquium required
  • Abstract must contain the colloquium main description, and a summary of each individual paper within the colloquium

 

Evaluation of proposals

  • All abstracts for general sessions will be double blind reviewed.
  • Main parent abstracts for colloquia will be double blind reviewed. All abstracts for individual presentations within each colloquia will not be peer reviewed, but are expected to be at a standard commensurate to the colloquium parent abstract.

Review of criteria are as follows:

  • Appropriateness and significance to COMELA themes
  • Originality/significance/impact of the research
  • Clarity/coherence of research concerns
  • Theoretical and analytical framework(s)
  • Description of research, data collection, findings/conclusions, rhetoric, and exegesis as a whole
  • For colloquia, importance/significance of the overarching topic and/or framework(s) addressed, and its coherence of and with individual presentations.

 

For more information, please contact:

Chair

Professor Helena Maragou

Helena P. Maragou, PhD

Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences

The American College of Greece

 

Head of Communications

Ms. Nhan Huynh

[email protected]
https://comela2020.acg.edu

Sep
17
Thu
Raising Indigenous Voices in Academia Conference
Sep 17 – Sep 19 all-day

Raising Indigenous Voices in Academia
September 17–19, 2020

Seneca Resort & Casino
310 Fourth Street, Niagara Falls, New York 14303

We are pleased to announce a Call for Proposals for Raising Indigenous Voices in Academia, A RIVA Conference on the Scholarship of Indigenous Knowledge

 

Room Rates

Wed. & Thurs Single/Double – $115 (taxes & fees included) Fri. & Sat. Single/Double $225 (taxes & fees included)

For Hotel Reservations Call: 1-877 873-6322, or (716) 299-1100

Invited speakers

Salish Scholar Dean Nickolai – “Exploring Indigenous Methodological Perspectives in Cultural Resource Management”; Australian Gumbaynggirr Scholar Clark Webb – “Increasing Indigenous Voices in Universities”; Sami Scholar Gunvor Guttom – “The Academic Relevance of a Sami Speaker Researching Sami Language”; Inuit/Greenlandic Scholar Naja Dyrendom Graugaard – “Kalaallit Sealing and the Arctic Sealskin Industry Through Inuit Hunting Knowledge in Greenland”; Salish Scholar Shandin Pete – “Intersecting Ancient Salish Hydrological Knowledge with Modern Hydrological Tools”; and Miami Scholar and MacArthur Foundation “Genius Award” recipient Daryl Baldwin

Presentation Types

The conference features research addressing academic areas of interest in archeology, ethno- botany, linguistic anthropology, political/legal anthropology, socio-cultural anthropology, or any other sub discipline of anthropology. Proposals are invited for paper presentations, interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, or innovative showcases.

All scholars and administrators are welcome. Indigenous scholars, as perhaps the most underrepresented ethnic group globally, are encouraged to submit proposals.

Registration Fee Schedule

Registrations received prior to May 1st – $360, after May 1st – $400.

Student registrations received before May 1st – $200, after May 1st – $240.

For information on submitting registration form & fee go to www.umt.edu/nsilc/contact.php

 

Submit completed registration forms to [email protected]

Presentation proposals should be submitted by March 1, 2020