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Feb
20
Wed
Call for Papers: Rurality and Future-Making
Feb 20 all-day

Rurality and Future-Making: Comparative Perspectives from Europe, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean 
May 24–25, 2019
NSG, University of Cologne (organized jointly by the following Regional Working Groups of the German Anthropological Association (GAA) – RG Europe, RG Middle East and RG Mediterranean)

 

 

Submission Deadline: February 20, 2019

The conference language will be English.

If you are interested to present a paper, please send an Abstract (200-300 words) to [email protected] by December 31, 2018.

We are planning to publish the proceedings of the conference in an edited volume.

 

Conveners:

  • GAA Regional Working Group Europe:
  • Jelena Tošić (St. Gallen/Vienna), Andreas Streinzer (Frankfurt/Vienna) GAA Regional Working Group Middle East:
  • Katharina Lange (Berlin)
  • GAA Regional Working Group Mediterranean:
  • Michaela Schäuble (Bern), Martin Zillinger (Cologne)
  • Organizers: Simon Holdermann (Cologne), Christoph Lange (Cologne)

Contact: [email protected]

 

This conference brings together three GAA regional working groups – Anthropology of Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean – to explore rurality as a reserve and resource for future-making in their interconnected and transnational regionalities. It invites participants to explore situated practices of future-making in order to trace how rurality is achieved, marked and (de-)stabilized in different places. Through concrete ethnographic case studies, we aim at conceptualizing the ‘rural’ beyond wellknown center-periphery dichotomies. Well aware that ‘the rural’ and ‘the urban’ can only be “understood as a continuum irreducible to the polarity of one or the other term” (Chio 2017:362); we use the rural lens to create an anthropological laboratory (Albera 1999) which enables us to “write against established categories” (Horden 2014:9). This conference invites researchers to reflect on the various perpetuated methodological urbanisms, ruralisms and regionalisms, i.e. the persisting preoccupation of ethnographers with urban spaces and research in geographically and/ or politically bounded categories like Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Most of these categories contribute to the construction of our methodological iron cage as Wimmer and Glick-Schiller pointed out in the term methodological nationalism (2002:302). With the focus on rurality as an anthropological laboratory and lens, we aim to challenge earlier essentialist approaches and at the same time emphasize its contradictory and thus productive potential.

While overall, the rural population may be on the decline, it may well increase in absolute numbers in specific places. And while rural population may predominantly rely on agriculture for a living, in various regions its share of GDP is diminishing. Poverty remains particularly pronounced in rural regions. In North Africa, this becomes evident in the inadequate access to education, health services, electricity or clean water (Barnes 2014). Moreover, the demographic exodus out of vast rural areas in parts of Southern Europe challenges not only individual but also communal lives as well as national political agendas. Nevertheless, grand visions of future-making by politicians and entrepreneurs remain geared towards rural regions – whether it be in terms of large-scale agricultural projects for the continuous fragile and fragmented landscapes of the Mediterranean, irrigation and electrification schemes for the exploitation of its natural resources, or in the form of touristic development agencies for purported isolated areas. Also, in various countries along the Mediterranean shorelines, governments continue to rely on networks and patronage systems in the rural hinterlands as its basis of power.

But rurality is not only played out as a resource for large scale politics of modernization, it can also be used as a socio-ecological reserve that people maintain to diversify their opportunities and resources in times of crises. Large-scale modernization schemes and their risks are thus mitigated by individual strategies to provide for alternative options and material foundations in case of failure. One de-centered perspective on rurality is Hauschild’s emphasis on the rural hinterland as material and political reserve which encompasses various available resources to ensure, expand and delimit agency (Hauschild 2008:217f.).

For a long time, Eastern and Southern Europe, the Mediterranean as well as the Middle East have been approached by their presupposed outstanding rural character in anthropological inquiry; like the notorious ‘honor-and-shame’ complex, ‘the rural’ can be seen as a “gatekeeping concept” for anthropologists who had been working in these areas (Appadurai 1986:357). This is apparently present in classical anthropological studies on ‘Mediterranean countrymen’ (Pitt-Rivers 1963, Davis 1977) as well as in the rich corpus of peasant studies from Southern Europe to the Middle East – a body of research and literature that has provided essential impulses in the formation of anthropological theory.

Arguably, anthropological research in recent decades has shifted away from the countryside to the metropoles, predominately exploring the rural through the lens of the urban, bureaucratic elites, cultural entrepreneurs and tourists’ promises (Deeb/Winnegar 2012:539). Against this background we want to promote a symmetrical anthropology of the rural, which opens up new perspectives for research.

Finally, we invite scholars to expand and multiply Horden and Purcell’s (2000) perspective on the Mediterranean to Europe as a whole and the Middle East. Their emphasis on the ruptures and connectivities of “human micro-ecologies” (Horden 2012: 28) pervading the karst landscapes of the Mediterranean and encompassing Southern Europe, parts of the Middle East and North Africa, can help us comparatively zoom in on webs of microregions in which rurality takes on different forms and meaning and is played out differently at different locales.

Research topics and questions for the conference may entail:

  • How and for whom does the rural/hinterland/landscape figure to be a meaningful space of social relations and livelihoods?
  • The ‘rural’ as backdrop for processes of globalization or the recursive rural impact on globalization
  • What are spatial and power implications of the Mediterranean as an imaginary category?
  • What are the perceptions of “rural Europe” and what kind of histories and future-making imaginaries do they imply?
  • The ‘mediatized Mediterranean’: rurality, infrastructures and media
  • How can we conceptualize local/global, rural/urban and periphery/center binaries in a more productive way?
  • The ‘rural’ in development practice and discourse and in changing modernization narratives
  • Migration and other rural (im-)mobilities?
  • Rurality, Scale and Migration
  • Rethinking the ‘rural’ with reference to Horden/Purcell’s historical ecology and its defining features of rupture and connectivity
  • The ‘rural’ as cultural identity and heritage – the entrepreneurial potential and imaginary for ‘the touristic gaze’
Mar
1
Fri
Call for Papers: Place Branding and Consumption of Heritage
Mar 1 all-day

Special Issue “Place Branding and the Consumption of Heritage”

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section “Sustainability of Culture and Heritage“.

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 March 2019

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050) calls for original research on the synergisms between the geographic attributes of place (regions, countries, cities, towns and landscapes) and how consumption —through tourism or via consumer goods and services—creates a special niche in regional and global economies. While globalization aims to homogenize consumer tastes and preferences, public and private stakeholders increasingly draw on folklore, culture, history, and the tangential attributes of landscape to add value to consumer and tourist experiences. Together, these synergisms portend a sustainable approach to improving the human condition in an increasingly borderless and limitless realm of consumption and tourist experiences. This process, however, is fraught with tension as different narratives about authenticity and heritage emerge. Accordingly, we seek contributions from across the social sciences and business fields that use both case-study and empirically-anchored perspectives, as well as approaches at broader, theoretical and meta-analytical levels, to explore these aspects of place-branding.

Topics might range from the rise of agricultural tourism (wine-circuits and viticulture, specialty produce), micro-breweries, social justice museums (the American south, Eastern Europe), and the burgeoning literature on “Made in [fill in the country],” to ways in which local, regional, and national products enlist color, music, story-telling, cultural icons, and myth-making to couple consumption or tourism-marketing strategies with place attributes.

The Guest Editor guarantees a timely yet thorough review and turnaround of all submissions. Sustainability, whose Impact Factor this fifth year of open-access publication is 2.075, is an international, scholarly journal whose peer-reviewed papers highlight the  environmental, cultural, economic, and social sustainability of human beings. It is indexed by SCIE, SSCI, and other databases.

If you have interest in this special topic issue, please provide a 150-word abstract first before formal submission. Looking forward to your contribution.

Prof. Dr. Joseph L. Scarpaci
Guest Editor

References

  • Arnould, E. J., & Thompson, C. J. (2005). Consumer culture theory (CCT): Twenty years of research. Journal of consumer research31(4), 868-882.
  • Ashworth, G., & Larkham, P. (2013). Building a new heritage (RLE Tourism). Routledge.
  • Dinnie, K. (2015). Nation branding: Concepts, issues, practice. Routledge.
  • Fehimović, D. & Ogden, R. (Eds.) (2017) Branding Latin America: Strategies, aims, resistance. Lexington Books.
  • Graham, B. J., & Howard, P. (Eds.). (2008). The Ashgate research companion to heritage and identity. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
  • Graham, B., Ashworth, G., & Tunbridge, J. (2016). A geography of heritage: Power, culture and economy. Routledge.
  • Holt, D.B. (2004). How brands become icons: Principles of cultural branding. Harvard Business School.
  • Manning, P. & Ulisashvili, A. 2008. “Our Beer”: Ethnographic brands in postsocialist Georgia. American Anthropologist 109 (4): 626-641.
  • Morales, E. & Scapraci, J.L. (2012). Marketing without advertising: Brand preference and consumer choice in Cuba. Routledge
  • Park, H.Y. (2014). Heritage tourism. Routledge.
  • Pettygrove, M., & Ghose, R. (2018). From “rust belt” to “fresh coast”: Remaking the city through food justice and urban agriculture. Annals of the American Association of Geographers108(2), 591-603.
  • Pike, A. (2009). Geographies of brands and branding.  Progress in Human Geography, 33(5):  619-645.
  • Rivera, L. A. (2008). Managing “Spoiled” national identity: War, tourism, and memory in Croatia. American Sociological Review 73(4): 613-634.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2005), Plazas and barrios: Heritage tourism and globalization in the Latin American centro histórico. University of Arizona Press.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2007). Globalization tourists and heritage tourists in American culture: The case of Latin American historic districts. Material Culture 39 (2): 1-16.
  • Scarpaci, J.L. (2016). The meaning of objects. Material Culture 48:1-9.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Coupey, E. & Reed, S. 2018. Artists as cultural icons:  The icon myth transfer effect as a heuristic for cultural branding. Journal of Product & Brand Management. 27(3): 320-333.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Portela, A.H. (2009). Cuban landscapes: History, memory and place. Guilford.
  • Scarpaci, J.L., Sovacool, B.J., and Ballantyne, R. (2016). A critical review of the costs of advertising: A transformative consumer research perspective. Journal of Consumer Policy 39 (2): 1-22.
  • Schor, J.B. & Holt, D.B. (2000) The consumer society reader. The New Press.

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • place branding
  • heritage
  • consumer goods
  • tourism
  • cultural geography/cultural anthropology

Published Papers
This special issue is now open for submission.

Call for Papers:  Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora
Mar 1 all-day

Call for Papers:  Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora

10th Biennial Conference, November 5-9, 2019

The College of William & Mary

Williamsburg, Virginia, USA

 

Remembrance, Renaissance, Revolution: The Meaning of Freedom in the African World Over Time and Space

Proposal Submission Deadline: 1st March, 2019

The year 2019 marks the four hundredth anniversary of the origins of slavery in what became the United States with the arrival of approximately twenty Africans in modern-day Jamestown, Virginia in August 1619. Described in English records as “twenty and odd” Negroes, these captive Africans from West-Central Africa reflected the growing intensity of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, the world’s largest forced migration that connected Africa, Europe, the Americas, the Caribbean, and Asia. This global system of migration, enslavement, and oppression was critical to the making of the modern world. Throughout the Black world, unfortunately, the emancipation of enslaved people did not result in full freedom.Moreover, decades of European worldwide colonial domination, especially within the African continent, further obstructed people of African descent in the global political economy, with a continued impact in the present day.

Africa is the birthplace of humankind, and under a multiplicity of circumstances, African descendants have dispersed and migrated to every corner of the globe. These numerous African diasporas are marked variously by (in)voluntary movement, servitude, trade, military/imperial objectives, and cultural, academic, and professional ambition. This broader understanding provides new opportunities to fully appreciate the complex histories and creative cultures of today’s many African diasporas. Despite vast differences across and within contemporary African diasporas around the globe, there remain broad commonalities of marginalization, exclusion and relative material deprivation for African-descended people in their respective societies. The contemporary world has seen a resurgence of blatant racism, xenophobia, misogyny, homophobia, and other forms of intolerance directed towards the African-descended and other communities racially constructed as “others”. But despite past and present horrors, African-descended peoples across the globe have survived and thrived, remembering their pasts and re-envisioning their futures in ways that continue to lead to and strive for renaissance, freedom, and revolution in the contemporary world.

ASWAD invites panel and individual paper proposal submissions for its 10th biennial conference to be held in Williamsburg, VA (USA), November 5 to 9, 2019 on the campus of the College of William and Mary to discuss, examine, and reflect on the legacies of enslavement and the meaning(s) of freedom for people of African descent nationally and globally on the four hundredth anniversary of the origins of slavery in what became the United States. We also seek papers that interrogate the many other diasporas that began (and continue) in Africa, and continue to flourish in Europe, Asia, the Middle East, South and Central America, the Caribbean and the Pacific/Indian Ocean basins.  We are particularly interested in panels and papers on the conference themes of remembrance, renaissance, and revolution in the many African diasporas across time and space. However, we encourage papers from any time period and topic related to the study of the African-descended.

As an interdisciplinary organization, ASWAD invites presentations that illuminate the lives of Africans and African descendants from scholars of any discipline, including the humanities, social sciences, performing arts, education, physical sciences, life and health sciences, engineering, and computer science. We aim to collaborate with activist and intellectual communities around sustained dialogue involving the black diaspora and the meaning of freedom across time and space, and the historical and contemporary legacies of slavery.

In addition to academics, ASWAD welcomes artists, activists, journalists, and independent scholars with specific interests in one or more of the many African Diasporas. We are especially keen to forge and to enhance collaborations between academics, independent scholars, and community members.

We encourage proposals that align with the conference theme. Suggested panel themes include, but are not limited to the following:

  1. Slavery, Abolition, and Reparations
  2. Freedom, Resistance, and Revolution
  3. UN International Decade for People of African Descent, 2015-2024
  4. Importance of Remembering the Year 1619
  5. Humanitarianism and Human Rights across the African World
  6. Diasporic Feminisms, Women, Girls, and Global Africa
  7. Political Economy, Globalization, Migration, and the African Diaspora
  8. Religion, Power, and Praxis in the African Diaspora
  9. Music, Performance, and Cultural Activism in Africa and the Black World
  10. Families, Community, and the Black World
  11. The State, Citizenship, and Civil Society
  12. Black Lives Matter, Reaja ou Será MortaReaja ou Será Morto;Mass Incarceration, State Violence, and Resistance across the African World
  13. Black Queer Diasporas and Black LGBTQ People
  14. White Nationalism, Racism, Xenophobia, and the Contemporary Black World
  15. The Chesapeake and the African Diaspora
  16. Food, Health, Wellness, and Global Africa
  17. The Environment, Climate Change, Sustainability, and the African World
  18. Media, Representations, and Black People
  19. Literature and Translating the African Diaspora and Black Identities
  20. Social Media, Electronic Mediations, Digital Mobilities, and Technological Connectivities
  21. Diasporic communities in the Asian/Pacific World: China, India, Japan, etc.
  22. Sports and Black Athletes
  23. Temporality, Memory, and the African Diaspora
  24. Pedagogy, Higher Education, Community, and Activism
  25. Labor Organizing in Local and Transnational Contexts
  26. Black Europe
  • Geographies, Space, and Place
  • African Diasporic Futures: Challenges and Opportunities
  • Pre-Atlantic Slave Trade Diasporas
  • Diasporic Communities in the Middle East
  • Trade, Labor, and Economic Migration Diasporas
  • Professional/Educational Diasporas
  • Cultural and Ethnic- Identified Diasporas (i.e. Yoruba diasporas)
  • “State of the Field” Panels

Information about Excursions:   The conference will take participants out of the academic setting and into local Virginia communities. Conference attendees will visit prominent historic sites and participate in community events, such as the “Day of Remembrance” at Point Comfort, the first landing place of Africans in 1619. They will tour Fort Monroe, the site of liberation of 100,000 blacks who escaped slavery during the Civil War; sites of the Underground Railroad and runaway slave maroon communities; the Nat Turner Trail and the Emancipation Oak at Hampton University. The conference coincides with an African Diaspora Food Festival, to be held in Williamsburg from November 8-10, 2019. Showcasing African, Caribbean, South American, African American and Native American cuisines and cultures, the Festival speaks to the diasporic nature of the ASWAD conference. The ASWAD conference will conclude with a tour of Richmond’s historic Jackson Ward, viewing of 1619 exhibits at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the Virginia Museum of History and Culture and a closing reception at the Institute of Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR SUBMISSIONS OF PROPOSALS

All ASWAD conference presenters must be members of ASWAD.

To join or renew, please click here: https://aswad.memberclicks.net/

Whole panel proposals will be given priority in the review process. Please submit a panel proposal of no more than 200 words for thematic panels consisting of no more than four panelists, and a possible discussant. Proposals must include paper abstracts of no more than 150 words and bios of no more than 50 words for each presenter. All participants must be members of ASWAD in good standing at the time of abstract submission.

The deadline for Panel/Paper Proposals is March 1, 2019 and acceptance notification is expected April 1, 2019. Confirmation of attendance and paid conference registration are required by May 15, 2019.

To submit proposals, please click here:  ASWAD Proposal Submission 2019

Mentoring Sessions:   ASWAD 2019 will also feature special mentoring sessions open to registered conference attendees (Sign-up details will be posted at a later date).

Note:  For an online version of this Call for Papers please click here:  ASWAD CFP 2019

The International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019: Perspectives Conference
Mar 1 all-day

1st Call for Proposals
The International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019: Perspectives Conference
Purdue University Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 31 – November 2, 2019
https://iyil2019perspectives.org/

 

About the conference
The conference will celebrate the United Nations’ International Year of Indigenous Languages from a variety of perspectives including policy, education, linguistic, community, and others. Experts from around the globe have been invited to participate in panels, present keynote talks, and share their work and experiences in promoting Indigenous languages. Conference themes will include, but are not limited to the following:

• Community achievements and Indigenous languages
• Community collaborations and partnerships
• Educational policy for language revitalization and maintenance
• Indigenous languages in the contemporary world
• Indigenous voices in popular culture (e.g. social media, fiction, poetry, film, hip hop)
• Indigenous languages and multilingualism
• Diaspora and Indigenous language learning

While proposals that address these themes are especially encouraged, proposals on other subjects related to Indigenous languages are also welcomed.

In the spirit of this celebration, participants will share their experiences and knowledge and thus bring community voices, policy voices, and academic voices together.

Presentation format: Paper, poster, performance, and technology or other type of showcase

Presentation time slots: Papers and performances will be allowed 30 minutes (20 minutes for presentation + 10 minutes for questions and answers). Poster presentations will run during a determined time slot, but posters will be displayed throughout the day of the poster presentation. Technology or other type of showcases may choose between a presentation time slot or an exhibit booth.

Proposal deadline: March 1, 2019

Notification of acceptance: April 1, 2019

Proposal submission information

  • Language: Proposals should be submitted in English, but presentations can be in any language (we ask that presenters ensure that translation in English is made possible in order to be accessible to all participants, while we cannot provide translators we will work with presenters as needed to this end). Because we anticipate a number of non-experts to participate in the conference, we ask that your proposals and, if accepted, your presentations and posters be devoid of technical jargon and directed towards a non-expert audience.
  • Number of proposals: Authors may submit no more than one individual and one co authored proposal, or no more than two co-authored proposals
  • Content: Proposals should describe the content of the presentation, including the intended audience and how it relates to the conference themes
  • Length: Please limit your proposal to 500 words, not including references
  • Anonymity: To facilitate blind peer review, please do not include your name or affiliation in your proposal or filename. Your proposal should only include your presentation title, proposal content, and list of references (if applicable)
  • Format: Please submit your abstract as a PDF file or as a Word document
  • Due date: Proposals are due by March 1, 2019
  • Submission system: We will use the EasyChair Proposal submission system. To be able to use this system, you will first need to sign up for a free EasyChair Author account, if you don’t already have one. From there you can submit your abstract as an Author and make any updates or modifications to your proposal submission up to the submission deadline. Submit your proposal here to EasyChair. If you should have questions about the system, please contact Carmen Jany at [email protected]
  • Other submission possibilities: Hard copy submissions will be accepted from those who do not have Internet access. Please send one hard copy of your proposal, along with the following information: (1) your name, (2) affiliation, (3) mailing address, (4) phone number, (5) email address, and (6) title of your paper. Hard copies must be post-marked on or before March 15, 2019 and may be sent to:

    IYIL Conference/Carmen Jany
    5500 University Parkway
    San Bernardino, CA, United States 92407

Mar
15
Fri
The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019
Mar 15 all-day

The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019

Bounded languages, Unbounded

The politics of identity remain central to the mediation of language change. Here, boundaries rise and fall, thus motivating the ephemeral nature of community. The Mediterranean region is one replete with histories and power struggles, clearly demarcating nation, community, and ethnicity. Identities, language ideologies, and the languages themselves, have sought boundedness, dynamics which have indeed sought change over eons, through demographic and geographic movements, through geopolitics, through technological innovation. In a current era of technological advancement, transnational fluidity, intellectual power, capitalism, and new sexualities, we question, once again, the boundedness of language and identity, and ways in which to unbound languages and ideologies. However, mroe than before, we now increasingly require anthropological toil, so to innovative ways to locate these ideologies and their fluid boundaries, actively. We now then need to unbound these languages, and their ideologies, so to arrive at progressive realizations, and to rectify, or at least see past, the segregations of old.

The theme for the COMELA 2019,

Bounded languages, Unbounded

encapsulates an ongoing struggle throughout Mediterranean regions. The continuous tension between demarcation, yet concurrent legitimization, of languages, language ideologies, and language identities, has now entered an era where new modes of interactivity require language communities to take on roles superordinate to the past, and where flexible citizenship now operates within, and not only across, language communities.

For more information about the CFP, please visit the website.

 

Abstract and poster proposal submission

Opens: August 13, 2018 at midnight (CET Time)
Closes: January 25, 2019 at midnight (CET Time)

CFP: Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies
Mar 15 all-day

Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies is a flightless, multi-site conference that invites interdisciplinary attention to confluences between environmental and religious perspectives and practices in the long Anglophone nineteenth century (1780-1900). The conference will be broadcast online from four participating sites:

• Armstrong Browning Library at Baylor University (Texas)
• Lancaster University (UK)
• University of Washington (Seattle)
• Georgetown University (Washington, D.C.)

This conference calls for attention both to earlier religious environmental consciousness and to the environmental impact of our scholarship today. According to TerraPass, air travel for an average international conference generates roughly 100 metric tons (mT) of carbon dioxide equivalents, the same greenhouse-gas impact as consuming 11,252 gallons of gasoline, burning 109,409 pounds of coal, or driving 245,098 miles in a passenger vehicle. In addition to avoiding air travel, we hope to lower barriers of cost and transportation, thereby enabling a more diverse and inclusive range of participation than is often possible at international conferences.

Rather than seeking to replace physical with digital networking, this conference will take a hybrid approach by linking several international sites. Events will be live-streamed on a shared conference website, where, after the conference dates, they will also be recorded for future access.

The Call for Papers is available on the Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies conference site: baylor.edu/library/ecologyreligion. I encourage you to visit the site and submit a proposal for a paper or panel session. I look forward to your submission and to our engagement with one another through this new way of conferencing.

Mar
18
Mon
Call for Papers: Perpetrating Violence
Mar 18 all-day

Violence. A Journal is launching a call for papers on the theme “Perpetrating Violence.” This special feature will be coordinated by Sabrina MELENOTTE (Violence and Exiting Violence platform).

Your article should be sent to Violence before March 18, 2019.

Violence. A Journal is also welcoming articles dealing with a wider range of topics, on the issues of violence and exiting violence. Each issue will be coordinated by its two Editors-in-Chief: Scott STRAUS (UW-Madison) and Michel WIEVIORKA (FMSH). Articles not intended to be part of a special feature can be sent to Violence anytime throughout the year.

Special Feature Theme

The special feature “Perpetrating Violence” will concentrate on acts of violence associated with collective processes, even when the action is individual. It will leave legal questions to the side.

What drives some people to commit violent acts? Conversely, why do some others, similar in all respects, not commit them? What is this liminal space that opens up between mental radicalization (this moment of the fiction of violence, of its imagination) and its enactment? Does this moment exist in all experiences? Of course, the analysis must take account of the context, according to whether it is peacetime or wartime, for example. Moreover, doesn’t there exist a switch (rapid or not, conscious or not) towards the enactment of murderous deeds?

Often inexpressible or quiet, but not necessarily so, the moment of acting violently can be rich in meanings, giving rise to many questions that this special feature is intended to explore. In acts of extreme and mass violence, the executioners’ interest is not always limited to killing the enemy, and the body can become the vehicle for messages of war. Cruelty can go from humiliation to animalization; it can be gratuitous, or it may be purposeful, turning terror and fear into methods of control and domination by killing and “re-killing” the body through postmortem mutilations. The Shoah demonstrated the heights of cruelty and sophistication that can be reached by the will to completely destroy a human group and, thus, the individuals comprising it. Collective violence, as in incidents of lynching and stoning, may arise from a runaway process in which actors use rudimentary methods that presuppose a face-to-face confrontation. Torture, systematized in certain wars (the Algerian War for example), and used by dictatorships like those of Latin America in the 1970s, transgresses the codes of war, to the detriment of civilian populations in particular. Modern communication technologies allow actors to stage their cruelty as a spectacle; for example, we see this with some Mexican drug traffickers, with ISIS, or, in France, with Mohammed Merah, responsible for a series of murders in Toulouse and Montauban in March 2012, which raises many questions about the reasons for this staging and the use of social networks.

By avoiding the twofold pitfalls of a sociologism that explains everything by collective processes and a psychologism that ignores them, it will thus serve to analyze, in a dynamic and possibly transversal manner, what connects—or fails to connect—Nazi executioners, global jihadists, Mexican drug traffickers, volunteers or conscripts in guerrillas and contemporary wars, each time they perpetrate violence. This special feature is intended to bring together all the disciplines comprising the social sciences, without exclusion; it will also welcome the words and thoughts of actors who are well placed to have observed these questions closely, for example, within NGOs.

What do we know about committing acts of violence, about individuals who perpetrate them, about the processes of subjectivation and desubjectivation that animate them, about the methods of which they make use, about the contexts that make acting violently easier or more difficult? Should the knowledge produced by research on perpetrating violence allow us to construct models, strategies, and modes of action for the prevention of extreme and mass violence, and if so, according to what criteria? This special feature will help us to better understand not only individual or collective violence, whether political, social, religious, etc., but also to better understand pre- and post-violence conditions. Is it possible to construct models, strategies, and modes of action for the prevention of extreme and mass violence, and if so, according to what criteria?

Calendar

Articles should be sent to Violence’s editorial board before March 18, 2019, if they are intended for the special feature, or for the first issue of Violence in general. Otherwise, you can submit your article(s) anytime throughout the year. You can send your article to Violence’s Managing Editor, Charlotte Groult: [email protected].

Articles should include a summary and a detailed bibliography. The editors also welcome preliminary proposals. In this case, your proposal should be sent several weeks before the deadline of March 18, 2019, if you want your article to be part of the first issue of the journal, especially its special feature. It should also be detailed enough to allow the Editorial Board to clearly understand the research materials on which the article is based, as well as the argument and the author’s intellectual approach, the principal hypotheses, the research findings, the central concepts, and the references.

If your article is accepted by the Editorial Board, it will then be sent out for peer review by the journal. Each article should be between 6,000 and 8,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography).

The author should make a special effort to use a writing style that will make the article easily understandable to the educated layperson and not merely to academic circles. Violence. A Journal has the ambition to reach a wider readership than an academic journal, especially the “actors” involved in preventing and exiting violence: NGOs, associations, politics, legal experts, and civil society.

Violence will be published both in print and online and will be available entirely in English. However, you can also write your article in French; Violence. A Journal will take care of the translation.

Mar
31
Sun
CFP: 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Mar 31 all-day

The 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society  

October 16-19, 2019 • Hyatt Regency Baltimore Inner Harbor • Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Proposal submission deadline: March 31, 2019

Community-Driven

You can’t stop the people of Baltimore, Maryland, from expressing the enduring traditions that define this City of Neighborhoods, where community-based efforts drive culture, spark change, and sustain place-making. Come to Baltimore and experience what it means to be community driven in a city that illuminates the diverse geographies and peoples of Maryland and the surrounding region—urban, rural, Appalachian, and estuarine.

This meeting will explore what it means for the folklore world to be of, by and for the people—community driven. We invite participants to reveal how communities use the tools of folklore to build partnerships, foster innovation and sustainability, respond to injustice, and create conditions for reconciliation in a time of division and distraction; to explore community-driven curation and preservation in a digitally connected world; and to participate in discussions on building capacity to help folklorists better serve the communities with whom they work. Equally, we invite reflections on folklore as an instrument for constructing and shaping communities themselves, recognizing that this is not always a benevolent process for either insiders or outsiders.

In focusing on what is community driven, we also draw attention to:

  • Partnerships
  • Local responses and resistance
  • Work fostering new connections
  • Grassroots curations of action and sustainability
  • The role of cultural workers in sustaining communities and expressive life
  • The value of (and definitions of) community in times of division
  • Folk and vernacular culture in a digitally connected world
  • Community resilience and solidarity on the front lines of climate change

The Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen relationships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required. We especially welcome proposals for creative presentations in any format that are populated robustly by community members telling their own stories in their own words. Contact [email protected] to discuss alternative presentation formats.

You can find more information about the meeting, including the full theme statement, instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2019AM.

Proposals may be submitted February 15–March 31, 2019.

 

Apr
10
Wed
Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges 2019 Meeting
Apr 10 – Apr 13 all-day

Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC) Bi-annual National Conference

April 10-13, 2019

 

Metropolitan State University of Denver
890 Auraria Parkway
Denver, Colorado 80204

 

Please join us for this exciting national conference of the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges at the Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado. The conference will be hosted by President-Elect, Evin Rodkey of Muskegon Community College, Michigan ([email protected]).

Our bi-annual SACC-fest offers attendees a great opportunity to learn about SACC, network with new friends and contacts, acquire new skills and teaching tips, and enhance awareness of what is happening in other anthropology departments.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Please consider both attending and presenting at this conference. If you have ideas about teaching, a favorite lesson plan or teaching strategy, we want to hear from you! If you would like to discuss current issues facing faculty or departments or have resources that you would like to share, let us know! And, if you have a student project, club or other activities to share, bring your students and let them inspire us!

Paper presentations are tentatively scheduled for 15 minutes. If you would like to organize a discussion, or give a demonstration of a teaching method or assignment we can schedule a longer period. Abstracts should be no longer than 125 words. Call for papers will be announced soon.

 

REGISTRATION

You will be able to register for the conference after January 15, 2019 (est.). All registration will be handled by the AAA on their website http://www.americananthro.org/.


HOTEL

The conference hotel with a block of rooms will be the Springhill Suites by Marriott, 1190 Auraria Parkway, Denver CO. The hotel is very close to the university. https://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/densd-springhill-suites-denver-downtown/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy9qXwu6I3QIV1YTVCh0JGgVvEAAYASAAEgJu5vD_BwE

About SACC: SACC is a network of people who teach anthropology. A section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), SACC was founded in 1978 to encourage dialogue, collaboration and excellence in the teaching of anthropology. Visit us on the web at http://sacc.americananthro.org/.

May
9
Thu
The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020
May 9 all-day

The CALA 2020 – The (Annual) Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2020

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia, February 5 – 8, 2020

http://cala2020.upm.edu.my

Information

Following the success of the CALA 2019, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 2019, in Cambodia, we announce The CALA 2020, February 5-8, 2020, at The University Putra Malaysia, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia.

 

The CALA seeks to redefine scholarship on Asian Language and Society.

Purpose and Structure

The CALA 2020 invites Linguists, Anthropologists, Linguistic and Cultural Anthropologists, Culturologists, Sociologists, Political Scientists, Ethnologists, and those in related fields pertinent to Asia, to discuss work, and engage in scholarly collaborations, thus forming global networks.

Location

University Putra Malaysia

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Partners

  • Taylor and Francis Global Publishers (Official Publishing Partner)
  • 60 major academic institutions globally
  • Scientific Committee of over 100 academics

Publications

Journal Special Issues, and Monographs, from papers submitted that meet publication requirements. Papers selected will be published with Top-Tier journals. Here, ample assistance will be provided to revise manuscripts.

Dates

Abstract and poster proposal submission – November 17, 2018 – May 9, 2019

Notification of acceptance – No later than May 10 2018 (for those submitted prior to this)

Registration

Early bird – March 10, 2019 – June 14, 2019

Normal bird – June 15, 2019 – September 25, 2019

Presenters must register by September 25, 2019, to guarantee a place in the program. Registration will remain open after this, but conference organizers cannot guarantee placement in the conference.

Late bird – September 26, 2019 – February 8, 2020 (Conference end)

Conference dates

Wednesday February 5, 2020 – Saturday February 8, 2020

Final day comprises optional Anthropological excursion (separate cost)

Abstract submissions

The Call for Abstracts is now open, at http://cala2020.upm.edu.my, which contains all information

Anthropological Excursion

Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

Theme

Asian Text, Global Context

The CALA 2020, February 5-8, 2020, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia, will follow on from the success of the CALA 2019, in Siem Reap, Cambodia. The CALA 2020 will thus expand on work on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, as well as Asian Language and Society. Here, the global Linguistic Anthropologists will gather to discuss work on Linguistics, Anthropology, and Language and Society, in and of Asia, and beyond.

With an increased focus on the significance of Asian Language and society, the Annual CALA Conference has emerged at an appropriate time, opportuning academics from the West to tap into, and work with, Academia in the East. Scholars in institutions throughout Asia increasingly affiliate with the CALA network, as do those in Western contexts, to explore the vast possibilities of the Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, academically, and socioculturally, where the CALA network has now well contributed and has significantly boosted research, publications, and academic networks, globally.

Themed Asian Text, Global Context, The CALA 2020 will represent over 400 years of East-West global interaction, communication, and transnationalism. Throughout, symbolisms of Asian ‘texts’ have been significantly emphasized, (re)interpreted, contested, and distorted, while employed for cultural and political purpose. Asian texts have become highly representational, authenticating and legitimizing sociopolitical and cultural devices, where their potency should not be undervalued. Never have these texts shown more significance than in the present, as their intensified use, and their qualities in Asian identities long contested, seek this Linguistic Anthropological exploration.

The Asian text has thus regenerated itself as a semiotic, in that, as a verbal, non-verbal, and visual artifact, it encompasses the whole semiotic spectrum of that which is performatively Asian, and that which is distinct from the Non-Asian, yet a text which can interlink the East and the West, through a multitude of textual modes. The continuous recentralizations and recontextualizations of Asian texts, both locally and globally, have hence become vital to representations of Asia, Linguistically, Anthropologically, Socioculturally, Politically, and much more.

The CALA 2020 thus calls for renewed interpretations of Asian texts, and asks that we seek new perspectives of these complex texts, in global contexts. These interpretations increase in significance as; return migration to Asia is now a salient factor in transnational flows; online texts and their textual modes now compete ever more enthusiastically to effect disjunctures in previously Western dominated technologies; ontological conceptions of life and social interaction now increasingly draw from Asian philosophies, sociocultural models, lifeworlds, and Asian urban anthropologies, thus producing interstices for new or revised textual and textualized semiotics; the entangled complexities and intersubjectivities of political, sociocultural, and religious practices and their constraints, motivate engagements in interfaith dialogue, shifting ethnic demarcations, and sociopolitical interventions. Ultimately, the massive sets of Eastern demographics, and their expansive sets of social dynamics, models, and praxes, continue to uniquely inform and (re)complexify productions of Asian texts, in both local and in global contexts.

Strands

Abstract and poster proposals should address one or more of the key strands related to Asian countries and regions:

  • Anthropological Linguistics
  • Applied Sociolinguistics
  • Buddhist studies and discourses
  • Cognitive Anthropology and Language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Ethnographical Language Work
  • Ethnography of Communication
  • General Sociolinguistics
  • Islamic Studies and discourses
  • Language, Community, Ethnicity
  • Language Contact and Change
  • Language, Dialect, Sociolect, Genre
  • Language Documentation
  • Language, Gender, Sexuality
  • Language Ideologies
  • Language Minorities and Majorities
  • Language Revitalization
  • Language in Real and Virtual Spaces
  • Language Socialization
  • Language and Spatiotemporal Frames
  • Multifunctionality
  • Narrative and Metanarrative
  • Nonverbal Semiotics
  • Poetics
  • Post-Structuralism and Language
  • Semiotics and Semiology
  • Social Psychology of Language
  • Textualization, Contextualization, Entextualization

Presentation lengths

  • Colloquia – 1.5 hours with 3-5 contributors (Parts A and B are possible, thus 6-10 contributors)
  • General paper sessions – Approx. 20-25 minutes each, including 5 mins for questions/responses
  • Posters – to be displayed at designated times throughout the CALA 2020

Submission Guidelines (via the online submission website, or by email (see below))

General session papers

  • 18-word maximum presentation title
  • 400-word maximum abstract, including references

Colloquia

  • Submission of only the main abstract for colloquium required
  • Abstract must contain the colloquium main description, and a summary of each individual paper within the colloquium

Evaluation of proposals

All abstracts for general sessions will be double blind reviewed.

Main parent abstracts for colloquia will be double blind reviewed. All abstracts for individual presentations within each colloquia will not be peer reviewed, but are expected to be at a standard commensurate to the colloquium parent abstract.

Review criteria are as follows:

  • Appropriateness and significance to CALA themes
  • Originality/significance/impact of the research
  • Clarity/coherence of research concerns
  • Theoretical and analytical framework(s)
  • Description of research, data collection, findings/conclusions, rhetoric, and exegesis as a whole
  • For colloquia, importance/significance of the overarching topic and/or framework(s) addressed, and its coherence of and with individual presentations.

For more information, please contact:

Chair

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Hazlina Abdul Halim

Head, Dept. of Foreign Languages

Faculty of Modern Languages & Communication

Universiti Putra Malaysia

[email protected]

Head of Communications

Ms. Nhan Huynh

[email protected]

http://cala2020.upm.edu.my