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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Aug
20
Mon
Changing Global Hierarchies of Value? Museums, artifacts , frames, and flows
Aug 20 – Aug 22 all-day

Call for papers for the international conference 

Changing Global Hierarchies of Value? Museums, artifacts , frames, and flows

University of Copenhagen / National Museum of Denmark, 20–22 August, 2018

Museums are said to classify the world; but the world is changing, and so are the museum worlds and the worlds of arts and artefacts. This conference explores how the world is imagined and classified through the presentation, interpretation and classification of artifacts; and how the global hierarchy of value (cf. Herzfeld 2004) might be changing in through these flows and circulations.

In 2007, the German art historian Hans Belting coined the term “global art” to indicate that contemporary art was no longer the province of artists in the Global North, thus signaling a sea change in the international art world (Belting, in Weibel and Buddensieg 2007). Art historians, prior to Belting had long stipulated that the birth of modern art in 19th and 20th century Europe was partially predicated on inspirations from outside Europe in the guise of Orientalism, Chinoiserie, Japonisme, or “primitivism,” yet these modern artists were almost exclusively from Europe and—later—North America. Non-European artists went largely unnamed and unrecognized, as French surrealist poet André Breton’s famous mur d’atelier revealed. Modern art from the Global South or rapidly modernizing states in Eurasia and East Asia, was often dismissed as derivative of Western art, while contemporary traditional art was considered inauthentic (cf. Kasfir 1992).

Simultaneously, anthropologist Michael Herzfeld (2004) coined the term “global hierarchy of value” to denote the global cultural asymmetry that constituted the cultural successor to the political and military domination of European colonial systems. In the arts, early partial exceptions were Latin America, which—as the historical product of creole nationalisms (cf. Anderson 1982) and hence as a “pseudo-Europe” – saw the emergence of successful artists like Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo and of movements like Brazilian modernism and neo-concretism; and Japan, which experimented with locally inflected, but modern, architecture. The imbalance in the Euro-centered art world changed when the Magiciens de la Terre exhibition was held in Paris (1989) and featured contemporary art by both Western and non-Western—and named—artists in equal numbers, albeit without implying an equal hierarchy of value.

The Magiciens de la Terre exhibition marked the coming out of contemporary artists from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Oceania on the global arts scene, and brought out in their participation in numerous exhibitions such as the Modernités plurielles at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, but also in biennales, art festivals, art fairs, and auctions around the world. Simultaneously, art institutions and events outside of Europe and North America gained in global prominence, by adopting the cultural forms, classificatory devices and exhibitionary technologies developed in Euro-America and applying those in their own contexts and for their own purposes. One could say that while the modern period witnessed the emergence of a global Europe, the current “post-postcolonial” period is marked by the globalization of the other continents—at least in terms of the arts: in that sense it is increasingly possible to speak of global Asia, global Africa, global Latin America as geographic entities that challenge the global hierarchy of value. 

At the same time, recent decades have seen the unfolding of increasingly interconnected global networks of production, labor, consumption, and capital accumulation, a process broadly known as globalization. But can we also talk of a globalized taste regime or set of preferences à la Bourdieu? Are recently booming or expanding global players in Asia, Africa, and Latin America reconfiguring the relative value of styles, objects, or traditional artifacts, thereby challenging the old Eurocentric order and organization of the good and the beautiful? Even if the West remains the universal unmarked, attention should be given to the ways in which it is now often amplified, mocked, or ironized by non-Western masters of its artistic, architectural, or artisanal forms. How is globalization affecting existing or emerging museums as economic and commercial players in a world of accelerating mass tourism and brand fixation? How is the complex past of European interaction and Eurocentric notions of cosmopolitanism rethought and exhibited today in postcolonial theaters of historical encounter, exchange, or conflict?    

This is the final conference of the project ‘Global Europe: Constituting Europe from the Outside In through Artefacts’ (see http://globaleurope.ku.dk/). The Global Europe project explores how the collection, circulation, classification and museum exhibition of objects define Europe from the outside in during Europe’s present loss of global hegemony—especially in relation to Japan and four non-European BRICS countries (Brazil, China, India, South Africa), in comparison with the early modern period of European ascendancy. This ‘Changing Global Hierarchies of Value?’ conference invites both paper proposals on a range of topics that explore global networks of valuation and validation and their local forms and entanglements in the current period. The papers are expected to be empirically grounded, and may—but do not have to—refer to the five countries targeted by the Global Europe project.

The keynote speech titled Museum Transactions: Negotiating Knowledges, Governing Cultures will be presented by Professor Tony Bennett of the Institute for Culture and Society of the Western Sydney University in Australia. Tony Bennett is the author of—among many other works—The birth of the museum: history, theory, politics (1995), Pasts beyond memories: evolution, museums, colonialism (2004), and Making culture, changing society (2013); and he currently leads the project ‘Museum, Field, Metropolis, Colony: Practices of Social Governance.’ For more information, please see https://www.westernsydney.edu.au/ics/people/researchers/tony_bennett.

The conference is convened by Prof Oscar Salemink, Amélia Siegel Corrêa PhD, Jens Sejrup PhD, Caroline Lillelund and Vibe Nielsen, who make up the research team for the Global Europe project.

Please send your abstract (300 words max) and short bio (300 words max)  to Marie Yoshida [email protected] before April 1, 2018. For inquiries, please contact Oscar Salemink [email protected].

Sep
12
Wed
Muslim Cultures in the Indian Ocean: Diversity and Pluralism, Past and Present
Sep 12 – Sep 14 all-day

International Conference
Muslim Cultures in the Indian Ocean: Diversity and Pluralism, Past and Present
September 12–14, 2018

This conference aims to explore the diversity of Muslim cultures prevalent in the Indian Ocean region where, historically, Muslims have interacted for centuries with each other and with other peoples and cultures. Islam not only provided the scaffolding that facilitated cultural exchanges but was also the pivot for transforming local societies. The conference seeks to bring together experts from different disciplines and backgrounds including archaeologists, historians, sociologists, anthropologists, geographers, and scholars of related disciplines to explore various facets of this diversity. This conference marks a reconnaissance of the Indian Ocean not as a periphery but as a centre for the study of Muslim cultures.

Indeed, over the past couple of decades, significant new research has been undertaken across East Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and the Indian subcontinent leading to fresh insights on a number of facets of Indian Ocean cultures. Some of these studies were written about the Indian Ocean on the longue durée and other studies were focused on local and regional histories. Cultural encounters across the Indian Ocean down the centuries have given rise to cities, towns, ports and other constructions and artefacts which, while remaining distinctive in themselves, also exhibit layers of shared features. They manifest the craftsmanship and values of their creators, peoples whose diversity is almost proverbial. Similar endeavours are present in almost all aspects of human creativity through contact, including religious beliefs and practices, literature, architecture, trade, cuisine, textiles and fashion, etc. Cultural contacts, exchanges and networks were facilitated by the sea as a link between these diverse worlds. Like the Mediterranean – so well studied by Fernand Braudel – the Indian Ocean is a rich contact zone that is central to the understanding of cultural diversity in this vast region.

Register here & download the program here. The registration fee includes: Entry for three days, lunches, coffee breaks and an inaugural dinner.

Sep
15
Sat
Migrants and Refugees in the Law
Sep 15 all-day

MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES IN THE LAW

Historic evolution, current situation and unsolved questions

IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CHAIR INNOCENT III

Murcia (Spain), December 12 -13 -14, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS
International Chair Innocent III calls on all interested researchers to submit papers related to the human mobility and the reception of refugees according to History of Law, Canon Law, Roman Law, Comparative Law, Philosophy, Theology, History, Sociology, Historiography and any other discipline related to the main theme, as stated in the following: 

SESSIONS

December 12: session  1.  THE MIGRATION IN  THE ANCIENT  AND MEDIEVAL HISTORY. Historical approach to human mobility.
December 13: session 2. NATION, STATE, REVOLUTION. The situation of the migrants and the refugees from the origin of the modern State.
December 14: session 3. BETWEEN EMERGENCY AND ORDINARINESS: Proposals for the enhancement of a constant phenomenon in the contemporary age

PROPOSALS

Title, academic affiliation, short CV and Abstract – 200 words – (EN, IT, ES, DE, FR), via mail:  [email protected] 

DEADLINE

September 15, 2018. The Scientific Committee will respond to the proposal before September 30, 2018. 

PUBLICATION

Papers selected by the Scientific Committee will be published in the special issue of the journal Vergentis (ISSN: 2445-2394) in the first half of 2019.

 

IV Congreso Internacional CÁTEDRA INOCENCIO III

Murcia (España), 12,13,14 diciembre de 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS
La Cátedra Internacional Inocencio III invita a los investigadores interesados a presentar trabajos relacionados con el tema de la movilidad humana y la acogida de los refugiados desde el punto de vista del Historia del Derecho, Derecho Canónico, Derecho Romano, Derecho Comparado, Filosofía, Teología, Historia, Sociología y cualquier otra disciplina relacionada con el tema propuesto, en el marco de las siguientes 

SESIONES

12     de diciembre: sesión 1. LA MIGRACIÓN EN EL MUNDO ANTIGUO Y MEDIEVAL. Enfoque histórico del tema de la movilidad humana.
13    de diciembre: sesión   2. NACIÓN, ESTADO, REVOLUCIÓN. La situación de los migrantes y de los refugiados desde el nacimiento del Estado moderno.
14     de diciembre: sesión 3. ENTRE LA EMERGENCIA Y LO ORDINARIO. Propuestas para la valorización de un fenómeno constante en la edad contemporánea

PRESENTACIÓN DE PROPUESTAS

Título de la comunicación, afiliación académica, breve curriculum vitae y resumen de 200 palabras. Idiomas: EN, IT, ES, DE y FR, vía email: [email protected] 

FECHA LÍMITE

15 de septiembre de 2018. El Comité científico aceptará o rechazará la propuesta antes del 30 de septiembre de 2018. 

PUBLICACIÓN

Las comunicaciones elegidas por el Comité científico serán publicadas en el número monográfico de la Revista Vergentis (ISSN: 2445-2394) en el primer semestre del año 2019.

 

IV Congresso Internazionale CATTEDRA INNOCENZO III

Murcia (Spagna), 12,13,14 dicembre 2018

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

La Cattedra Innocenzo III invita gli studiosi interessati ad apportare il loro contributo scientifico sul tema della mobilità umana e dell’accoglienza dei rifugiati dal punto di vista della Storia del Diritto, del Diritto Canonico, del Diritto Romano, del Diritto Comparato, della Filosofia, della Teologia, della Storia, della Sociologia, e di ogni altra disciplina pertinente al tema proposto, nell’ambito delle seguenti

SESSIONI

  • dicembre: sessione LA MIGRAZIONE NEL MONDO ANTICO E MEDIEVALE. Approccio storico al tema della mobilità umana.
  • dicembre: sessione NAZIONE, STATO, RIVOLUZIONE. La situazione dei migranti e dei rifugiati a partire dalla nascita dello Stato moderno.
  • dicembre: sessione TRA EMERGENZA E ORDINARIETÀ. Proposte per la valorizzazione di un fenomeno costante nell’età contemporanea.

PRESENTAZIONE DELLE PROPOSTE

Titolo della comunicazione, affiliazione accademica, breve curriculum vitae e abstract di 200 parole. Lingue: EN, IT, ES, DE, FR, via mail a: [email protected]

TERMINE

15 settembre 2018. Il Comitato scientifico darà risposta a coloro che avranno presentato l’abstract entro il 30 settembre 2018.

PUBBLICAZIONE

Le comunicazioni scelte dal comitato scientifico saranno pubblicate nel numero monografico della Rivista Vergentis (ISSN: 2445-2394) nel primo semestre del 2019.

Sep
19
Wed
Vienna Anthropology Days 2018
Sep 19 – Sep 22 all-day

VANDA Call for Papers – Deadline extended until June 15th, 2018. Submit your paper now!

VANDA is an international conference, taking place in the beautiful capital of Austria on September 19-22, 2018, which aims to bring together scholars from various fields of anthropology, social sciences and humanities.

VANDA is meant to be more than a mainstream conference. It includes an interactive Young Scholars’ Forum, where graduate students can network, receive mentoring and practical advice from experienced researchers. Apart from the classic conference formats session organizers are free to introduce their own creative formats.

VANDA is a green, socially inclusive conference and offers a unique social activity program.

VANDA is a joint effort by three anthropological institutions in town – the Institute for Social Anthropology (ISA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Weltmuseum Wien (formerly the Museum of Ethnology), and the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Vienna.

 

Sep
24
Mon
Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’
Sep 24 – Oct 2 all-day

Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’

24 September-02 October 2019, Svaneti & Tbilisi, Georgia

Why are some places especially prone to associations with the supernatural? Might it be because of liminal geographies, of the complex histories of ancient human landscapes, of fear about what lurks in the darkness? Are communities’ beliefs shaped by the environments in which they live, or does the recurrence of certain belief across environmental and geographic divides suggest that place is ultimately irrelevant? When we read a book or watch a film with supernatural themes, is the setting just window dressing, or can the mountains, the palaces, the forests, the skyscrapers be characters in their own right?

Previous conferences in this series have been held on remote islands (Shetland’s North Isles, 2014), in a hyper-dense city-state (Macau, 2015), and in the polar night (Svalbard, 2017). In 2019, the conference will go farther and higher than ever before, venturing up into the wild mountain valleys of and ancient cities of Georgia, a country at the crossroads of East and West.

This conference considers the themes of 1) folk belief, legends, and vernacular religion and 2) the supernatural in literature and film. We will combine academic presentations with explorations of communities in Georgia’s Svaneti and Tbilisi regions. Special emphasis will be given to the question of the role that ‘place’ plays in the conceptions of the supernatural: from folk narratives to local religious traditions; from the monsters, fairies, and witches of cinema to the miraculous in literature. Could these tales and customs occur just about anywhere? Or do they take place in the just the place they need to be?    

How to make attend and make a presentation.

Presentations are welcome on all aspects of of either folk belief or the supernatural in literature and film, though we encourage delegates to address the theme of the role of place in conceptions of the supernatural.Presentations last 15 minutes and will be followed by around 5 minutes’ question time. Note that, due to the ‘remote’ location of the conference, audio-visual aids will not be available for presentations.

The first deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2018. (Later abstracts may be accepted if there is room available at the conference, but people who submit an abstract prior to the deadline will have the first opportunity to reserve a spot and to take advantage of the early registration rate.) You can submit your abstract here. The deadline for early registration is 30 November 2018.

Sep
27
Thu
German Studies Association: Call for Seminar Proposals
Sep 27 – Sep 30 all-day

GERMAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION: CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

The 42nd GSA Conference in Pittsburgh, PA (September 27–30, 2018) will continue to host a series of seminars in addition to conference sessions and roundtables.

Seminars meet for all three days of the conference. They explore new avenues of academic exchange and foster extended discussion, rigorous intellectual debate, and intensified networking. Seminars are typically proposed and led by two to three conveners and they consist of 12 to 20 participants, including scholars from different disciplines and at different career stages. Seminars may enable extended discussion of a recent academic publication; the exploration of a promising new research topic; engagement with pre-circulated papers; an opportunity to debate the work of scholars with different approaches; the coming together of groups of scholars seeking to develop an anthology; or the in-depth discussion of a political or public policy issue, novel, film, poem, artwork, or musical piece.

In order to facilitate extended discussion, seminar conveners and participants should participate in all three seminar meetings. Please note that seminar conveners and seminar applicants who have been accepted for seminar participation will not be allowed to submit a paper in a regular panel session. However, they may take on one additional role in the conference as moderator or commentator on another session independent of their enrollment in a seminar, or they may participate in a roundtable.

Although we accept proposals from conveners who have directed a seminar during the past two consecutive years, we give preference to newcomers and thus encourage the rotation of seminar conveners in similarly-themed seminars. We further recommend that those conveners contact the coordinators of the Interdisciplinary Network Committee, Professors Pamela Potter ([email protected]) and Winson Chu ([email protected]), to establish an official GSA Network on their topic.

The application process has two steps. Initially, we invite you to submit a preliminary proposal that includes the following items:

  1. Title
  2. Names of conveners
  3. A 150-word description of the seminar’s subject (which will eventually be used in the call for participants, the printed program, and the online program/mobile app)
  4. A 50-word description of the format of the seminar (which will also appear in the call for participants, etc.)

These items are due by November 13, 2017.

Please submit your application online at https://www.xcdsystem.com/gsa. Your username and password are the same ones you use to log in to your GSA profile at https://thegsa.org/members/profile. Please note that you must be a current member of the GSA to submit a proposal. If you need your password reset, please contact Ms. Ursula Gray ([email protected]) at Johns Hopkins University Press. If technical questions or problems arise with the submission interface itself, please contact Elizabeth Fulton at [email protected].

At this point, the GSA Seminar Committee will provide suggestions and assistance for the final submission, which is due by December 13, 2017. The committee will then review seminar proposals and post a list of approved seminars and their topics on the GSA website by early January 2018.

 

The GSA Seminar Committee consists of:

Margaret Eleanor Menninger (Texas State University) | [email protected] (Chair)

Maria Mitchell (Franklin & Marshall College) | [email protected]

Faye Stewart (Georgia State University) | [email protected]

Sep
30
Sun
2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop
Sep 30 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop

Humanities Without Walls (HWW) is a consortium of humanities centers and institutes at 15 major research universities throughout the Midwest and beyond. Based at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), the HWW consortium is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In summer 2019, HWW is holding its second national, in-residence summer workshop for doctoral students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system. Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF)—a leading public humanities organization—designs and runs the summer workshop in consultation with HWW. Through a series of workshops, talks, and field trips, participants learn how to leverage their skills and training towards careers in the private sector, the non-profit world, arts administration, public media and many other fields.

We invite applications from doctoral students pursuing degree in the humanities and humanistic social sciences to participate in this three-week, in-residence summer workshop. This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be made to HWW by each university. To be considered, interested doctoral students must submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018.

About the Workshop: Launched in 2015 as an initiative of the HWW consortium, the workshop welcomes thirty participants each summer from higher education institutions across the United States. HWW Summer Workshop Fellows work in a variety of academic disciplines. They are scholars and practitioners who bring experience in community building, museum curation, filmmaking, radio programming, social media, project management, research, writing, and teaching. They are invested in issues of social justice and seek ways to bring humanistic values, insights, and skills to the public and private sectors.

In the spirit of practice-oriented learning, HWW and CHF partner with entities such as IDEO, a design and consulting firm, to lead students in real-world problem-solving exercises around important contemporary issues. Recognizing that each fellow’s skillset has been primarily oriented toward an academic track, the workshop includes sessions on values-based career planning, resume and cover letter construction, networking, and social media strategies from experts in career development.

Graduates from the workshop will emerge with a network of contacts in a range of professional realms; a significantly broadened sense of the career possibilities that await humanities PhDs; a cohort of HWW Summer Workshop Fellows (and friends!) from whom they may draw support and advice; and a set of resources aimed at helping them advance into the various realms considered under the broad rubric of “the public humanities.”

Where: Chicago, Illinois. Most weekday workshop events will take place at the Genevieve and Wayne Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church, 126 E. Chestnut St (at N. Michigan Ave.). The workshop also includes site visit to organizations around the city.

This is an in-residence workshop. As such, all participants, regardless of regular place of domicile, will be housed in private apartments. The costs of lodging are included in the fellowship. Staying in the provided housing is required as a condition of acceptance this fellowship. Details about lodging will be provided to those selected for the workshop.

When: Summer 2019—July 15th through August 2nd. Workshop sessions take place from approximately 9am to 5pm, Monday through Friday, for three weeks. Fellows are required to attend all workshop events and are strongly discouraged from traveling during the workshop. While there are no events scheduled during weekends, the CHF will circulate a list of interesting and exciting activities happening around Chicago that students are welcome to explore on their own.

Eligibility: All applicants must be enrolled in a doctoral degree program in a humanities or humanistic social science discipline at a PhD-granting institution within the United States. Applicants may be at any stage of their doctoral work, but they cannot have already received the doctoral degree at the time the workshop takes place. Ideally, applicants will have completed some coursework towards their doctoral degree, and they may have been advanced to candidacy but are not yet finishing their dissertations. International students are eligible to apply, but are responsible for confirming their registration and eligibility status at their home universities; HWW is not responsible for issuing visa paperwork.

Fellowship Prize: Each fellow will receive a $5,000 prize intended to cover travel to and from the summer workshop, most meals, and all incidentals. Fellows will be expected to arrange and pay for their own travel using the funds from this prize. The Chicago Humanities Festival will be arranging housing for all fellows in Chicago near the Gratz Center. All fellows are expected to attend the entire workshop for the entire three weeks and to stay in the provided housing.

Application Requirements: Interested doctoral students in the humanities should submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Combine and submit all application materials as a single PDF file.

The application file should contain:

  • A completed application cover sheet.
  • A narrative (1,000 words maximum) explaining the applicant’s intended career trajectory and addressing the following questions:
    • What is your experience with the “public humanities”?
    • Why are you interested in attending the workshop?
    • What kinds of knowledge are you seeking from the workshop?
    • What do you hope to achieve as a result of attending the workshop?
    • How do you envision sharing what you learn at the workshop with your department, campus, and beyond?
  • CV (two pages maximum),
  • Two letters of recommendation. One letter should be from the applicant’s primary adviser/dissertation chair; both should emphasize the applicant’s fit for this workshop.

Application Procedures: This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be subnitted to HWW from any given university.

Interested students must submit the application materials listed above to their universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Please do not submit your applications directly to HWW.

Humanities Center Directors, Graduate College Deans, or equivalents should submit the application for their nominee by 5:00 pm CDT on November 2nd, 2018. Applications should be submitted to [email protected] as a single PDF file attached to an email with the subject line “2019 Predoc Application.”

Announcement of fellowship awards will be made in January 2019. All questions should be directed to Jason Mierek, Director of Operations of the HWW Consortium, at [email protected].

CFP: 40th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association
Sep 30 all-day

CFP:   40th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association, March 7-9, 2019  Kansas City, Missouri: EXPLORATIONS 

The NCSA conference committee invites proposals that examine the theme of explorations in the history, literature, art, music and popular culture of the nineteenth century.

Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome from North American, British, European, Asian, African and worldwide perspectives.

From the early nineteenth century, when Lewis and Clark paddled through the Kansas City area on their way up the Missouri River to explore the North American continent, through the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, the building of factories and railroads, the mechanization of agriculture, and the advent of mass-produced cultural artifacts, the American Midwest became a crossroads for explorers and inventors, hucksters and entrepreneurs, artists and musicians, poets and dreamers who pursued their discoveries toward destinations made possible by the wide-open spaces of the Great Plains. In this way, the Kansas City region is emblematic of a larger set of trends in the global evolution of culture that radically altered the fundamental conditions of human existence during the nineteenth century.

  • How does the discovery of new geographical knowledge change the perception of human possibility?
  • How do innovations in science and technology affect the development of literature, music and art?
  • How does the recovery of previously unheard voices – of women, of workers, of ethnic minorities and people of color – influence the understanding of social history in America and the wider world?
  • Topics for investigation include encounters between Western explorers and indigenous people; the impact of steamships and railways upon changing perceptions of time and space; resistance and accommodation between traditional folkways and mass-produced culture; and the development of new idioms in literature, art and music to express the broader horizons of nineteenth-century self-awareness.

Proposals are due by September 30, 2018. Send 300-word abstracts (as an email attachment in MS Word format) along with a one-page CV to [email protected]

Call for Roundtable Proposals:  Roundtable discussions provide conference attendees the opportunity to engage in spirited conversation and collaborative exchange of information and resources. The format of roundtable discussions will be lively, interactive discourse among presenters and conference participants, not lecture or panel-style delivery. Roundtable sessions will be 80 minutes long. Presenters should regard themselves primarily as facilitators and should limit their own prepared remarks to five minutes or less. Extensive collaboration among the presenters before the conference is encouraged, since the goal is to foster extensive, diverse, and cogent perspectives on interdisciplinary research topics of general interest to NCSA members. Roundtables should be pre-organized by a group of 4-8 presenters. To propose a roundtable topic, please send a single 300-word abstract describing the general topic of the roundtable (as an email attachment in MS Word format) to [email protected].

Your abstract should include the proposed session title and the full name of each presenter, with their email and phone contacts, job title and affiliation. Indicate which presenter has agreed to serve as discussion moderator. Please be sure to confirm the participation of all presenters before submitting your abstract.

Roundtable proposals are due by September 30, 2018.

Conference Venue: The conference will be held at the newly renovated Marriott Country Club Plaza in midtown Kansas City, adjacent to the open-air shops and restaurants of the Country Club Plaza and in easy walking distance of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.  Conference Registration will open in December 2018. AV requirements are due January 1, early registration closes on January 20, and registration ends on February 20.  Conference website: http://www.ncsaweb.net/Current-Conference

Oct
5
Fri
Call for Applications: The Berlin Prize 2019/2020
Oct 5 all-day

The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2019/2020, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, questions of race in comparative perspective, and the interplay of exile and return.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester, but shorter stays of six to eight weeks are also possible. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

Fellowships are restricted to US citizens and permanent residents. Candidates in academic disciplines must have completed a PhD at the time of application. Candidates working in other fields—such as journalism, film, law, or public policy—must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers should have published at least one book at the time of application.

Please note that Berlin Prizes for visual artists, composers, and poets are determined in invitation-only competitions.

We will accept applications as of late May 2018. Following a peer-reviewed evaluation process, an independent Selection Committee reviews finalist applications. The 2019/2020 Berlin Prizes will be announced in late April 2019.

For further information and to apply online, please see: http://www.americanacademy.de/apply/apply-for-a-fellowship/

The application deadline for 2019/20 is Friday, October 5, 2018 (12 noon EST or 6 pm CET).

Oct
9
Tue
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference (EPIC) @ East-West Center
Oct 9 – Oct 12 all-day

EPIC is the premier international gathering on the current and future practice of ethnography and design in the business world.

EPIC people create better business strategies, processes, and products, as well as enhance people’s lives, by illuminating the arc of social change through theory and practice. Our conference is a diverse gathering of interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners from every industry, including Fortune-500 companies, technology firms, management consultancies and design studios, universities and NGOs, public policy organizations and think tanks. Through the formal program and informal networking opportunities, EPIC attendees share leading expertise, gain new knowledge and skills, find business partners and opportunities, and make the invaluable connections that have grown EPIC into an essential, year-round community.

Conference submissions go through a rigorous, double-blind peer review process and are published in open access proceedings accessible through AnthroSource and epicpeople.org/intelligences.

Information about past conference is available here.