Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

May
23
Thu
2019 Russell Sage Foundation Programs and Initiatives
May 23 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation Programs and Initiatives Currently Accepting Letters of Inquiry (Deadline: May 23, 2019): Behavioral EconomicsRace, Ethnicity, and ImmigrationSocial, Political and Economic InequalityDecision Making and Human Behavior in ContextImmigration and Immigrant IntegrationSocial, Economic, and Political Effects of the ACA

The Russell Sage Foundation was established by Mrs. Margaret Olivia Sage in 1907 for “the improvement of social and living conditions in the United States.” The foundation now focuses exclusively on supporting social science research in its core program areas as a means of examining social issues and improving policies. Grants are available for research assistance, data acquisition, data analysis, and investigator time for conducting research and writing up results. Budget requests are limited to a maximum of $175,000 (including overhead) per project (max. 2 years). A detailed letter of inquiry must precede a full proposal. See http://www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply. Questions should be sent to [email protected].

Jun
16
Sun
CFP: Cologne Summer School of Interdisciplinary Anthropology IV
Jun 16 all-day

Call for Papers (Deadline June, 16th 2019)

Cologne Summer School of Interdisciplinary Anthropology IV

“Beyond Humanism: Cyborgs – Animals – Data Swarms”

23rd – 27th September 2019 University of Cologne

During the last five decades, public, intellectual, and academic debates have created an increased awareness of so-called transhumanist discourses and social movements accompanied by a diverse body of theoretical works in philosophy, social sciences, and humanities which can broadly be described as posthumanist. Building on a three year long tradition (CSIA 2015–17) of interrogating what it means to be human in the 21st century from an interdisciplinary anthropological perspective, the Cologne Summer School of Interdisciplinary Anthropology 2019 relaunches under the title Beyond Humanism: Cyborgs

– Animals – Data Swarms. It picks up where the last CSIA left by taking a closer look at what a trans- and posthumanist agenda actually implies and how it relates to classic understandings of what it means to be human.

Organized by the Collaborative Research Center 806 “Our Way to Europe” and the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne, we invite PhD students and early postdocs from all disciplines whose academic interests follow similar perspectives and questions to join us for an intense week of interdisciplinary exchange and controversial discussion. Not simply dismissing new modes of humanisms as mere social phenomena in an age of accelerated technological and cultural transformation, we aim at taking them seriously in order to understand better the shifts in contemporary concepts and controversies about the human being.

By historically tracing back modes of humanism and their counterparts (e.g. post- and transhumanism, animism, multispecies assemblages, anthropocene, cosmopolitics, etc.) and by excavating their ontological and epistemological conditions, we identify three relational contestations of what it no longer means and three imaginaries of what it nowadays means to be human. The contestations are: (1) the distribution of human subjectivity and cognition, (2) the disintegration of human individuality, and (3) the dissolution of humanity as a unique ontological category.

The imaginaries we aim to bring into a fruitful contrast and comparison with these contestations are (1) the cyborg, (2) the animal, and (3) the data swarm. Taken together, relational contestations and imaginaries serve as interrogative tools for focusing on key questions ragarding the human/technology interface:

  • What are the multiple epistemological and ontological repercussions of transhumanist and posthumanist attempts to rethink and/or replace the human as cyborg, animal, or data?
  • How is the traditional understanding of the human as a subject belonging to a class of unique beings transformed if only one or two of the constituent properties (individual, subject, member of a unique class of beings) become contested? In other words: are post- and transhumanistic agendas, politics, and concepts more humanistic than proposed?
  • How are these new modes of humanism reflected in the arts and in public opinion? How do they transform everyday actions and perceptions of others (both human and non-human)?

Regarding scholarly inspirations we would like to mention such diverse theories as Donna Haraway’s materialist-feminist concepts of the cyborg and companion species/significant otherness (2016), Michael Tomasello’s evolutionary psychology (2014), Philippe Descola’s theory of animism (2013), Mario Blaser’s reconceptualization of cosmopolitics (2016), Nick Bostrum’s assumptions about singularity and super-intelligence (2014), Gregory Bateson’s ecology of the mind (1972), Gilbert Simondon’s technological humanism (1958; cf. Guchet 2010), Bruno Latour’s modes of existence (2012), and recent trends in the continental and analytical traditions to rethink panpsychism and materialism, such as Galen Strawson, Karen Barad, and Jane Bennett.

 

The five-day summer school is jointly organized by Thiemo Breyer (CRC 806 “Our Way to Europe”), Johannes Schick, Mario Schmidt (a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities), Christoph Lange (Department for Social and Cultural Anthropology), and Lars Reuke (Thomas Institute). It takes an interdisciplinary approach including perspectives from anthropology, philosophy, literature studies, and archaeology. Beyond these disciplines, we especially also encourage young researchers who develop interdisciplinary projects in visual and performing arts, informatics, engineering, design studies, cognitive, and the natural sciences to apply for our summer school.

Interested PhD students and early postdocs are invited to send their application (CV, draft of project, and motivational letter) to [email protected] before June, 16th 2019.

Limited travel funds for participants of universities from the ‚Global South‘ will be available.

For general questions and inquiries please contact [email protected] or visit Beyond Humanism: Cyborgs – Animals – Data Swarms.

Jun
27
Thu
Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholars Fellowship 2020-2021
Jun 27 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation

Visiting Scholars Fellowship for Academic Year 2020-2021

Application Deadline: June 27, 2019

The Visiting Scholars Program provides a unique opportunity for select scholars in the social, economic, political and behavioral sciences to pursue their research and writing while in residence at the foundation in New York City. The foundation annually awards up to 17 residential fellowships to scholars who are at least several years beyond the Ph.D. Visiting Scholars typically work on projects related to the foundation’s core programs and special initiatives. The fellowship period is September 1st through June 30th. Scholars are provided with an office at the foundation, computers, library access, supplemental salary support, and some limited research assistance. Scholars from outside NYC are provided with a partially-subsidized apartment near RSF. See http://www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply/visiting-scholars-program. Questions should be directed to James Wilson, Program Director, at [email protected].

Jul
1
Mon
2019 AIIS Fellowship Competition
Jul 1 all-day

THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDIAN STUDIES (AIIS) is a non-profit consortium of eighty-six American colleges and universities that supports the advancement of knowledge and understanding of India in all of its complexity. AIIS invites applications from scholars, professionals, and artists from all disciplines who wish to conduct research or carry out artistic projects in India in 2020-21.

JUNIOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS
Available to doctoral candidates at U.S. universities to conduct research for their dissertations in India for up to eleven months.

SENIOR RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS
Available to scholars who hold the Ph.D. degree, either for long-term (six to nine months) or short-term (four months or less) periods.

SENIOR SCHOLARLY/PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FELLOWSHIPS
Available to scholars and professionals who have not previously worked in India.

SENIOR CREATIVE AND PERFORMING ARTS FELLOWSHIPS
Available to practitioners of the arts of India.

Note: Non-U.S. citizens are welcome to apply for AIIS fellowships as long as they are either graduate students or full-time faculty at a college or university in the U.S. This provision is not required for U.S. citizens who apply for senior or performing/creative arts fellowships.

APPLICATION DEADLINE:
July 1, 2019

MORE INFO:
www.indiastudies.org

American Institute of Indian Studies 2020-2021 Fellowships
Jul 1 all-day

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDIAN STUDIES
Fellowship Competition 2020-2021

 

Deadline:  1 July 2019

The AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDIAN STUDIES is a non-profit consortium of eighty-six American colleges and universities that supports the advancement of knowledge and understanding of India, its people, and culture. AIIS welcomes applicants from a wide variety of disciplines. In addition to applicants in the Humanities and Social Sciences AIIS encourages applicants in fields such as Development Studies, Natural Resources Management, Public Health, and Regional Planning.

 

Applications to conduct research in India may be made in the following categories:

Junior Research Fellowships . Available to doctoral candidates at U.S. universities in all fields of study. Junior Research Fellowships are specifically designed to enable doctoral candidates to pursue their dissertation research in India. Junior Research Fellows establish formal affiliation with Indian universities and Indian research supervisors. Awards are available for up to eleven months.

Senior Research Fellowships . Available to scholars who hold the Ph.D. or its equivalent. Senior Fellowships are designed to enable scholars in all disciplines who specialize in South Asia to pursue further research in India. Senior Fellows establish formal affiliation with an Indian institution. Short-term awards are available for up to four months. Long-term awards are available for six to nine months. A limited number of humanists will be granted fellowships paid in dollars funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Senior scholars may also apply for an AIIS/Ashoka University Research and Teaching Fellowship.

Senior Scholarly/Professional Development Fellowships . Available to established scholars who have not previously specialized in Indian studies and to established professionals who have not previously worked or studied in India. Senior Scholarly/Professional Development Fellows are formally affiliated with an Indian institution. Awards are for periods of six to nine months.

Senior Performing and Creative Arts Fellowships . Available to accomplished practitioners of the performing arts of India and creative artists who demonstrate that study in India would enhance their skills, develop their capabilities to teach or perform in the U.S., enhance American involvement with India’s artistic traditions, and strengthen their links with peers in India. Awards will normally be for periods of up to four months, although proposals for periods of up to nine months can be considered.

 

For more information please contact the American Institute of Indian Studies.

Telephone: (773) 702-8638.
Email: [email protected].
Web site: www.indiastudies.org

Sep
1
Sun
2019 Praxis Award Competition
Sep 1 all-day

Recognizing Excellence in Practitioner Anthropology

THE 2019 PRAXIS AWARD COMPETITION

Since 1981, the Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists’ (WAPA) biennial Praxis Award competition has recognized outstanding achievement in translating anthropological knowledge into action as reflected in a single project or specific endeavor. Ideal award candidates are anthropologists who can demonstrate the value of anthropological knowledge, theory and methods to solve problems addressed through public and/or private sector efforts (e.g., government, industry, or non-profit).

Award recipients will receive a $1000 prize and will be recognized at a Praxis Award ceremony and reception at the 2020 meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology. For further information, requirements, and a list of past award recipients, please see https://wapadc.org/praxis. A brief pre-application (2 pages) is encouraged. Both the pre-application and full application templates are available on the Praxis Awards Guidelines page.

The competition is open to anyone holding an MA or PhD in any subfield of anthropology. WAPA strongly encourages submissions from individuals, mixed-discipline groups, or organizations where at least one anthropologist worked on and influenced the designated project. Entries are encouraged from anthropologists worldwide. All entries will be evaluated by an expert panel of anthropological practitioners.

Key Dates:

  • Optional pre-application deadline: July 1, 2019
  • Full application deadline: September 1, 2019
  • Awardees and other applicants notified: January 2020
  • Praxis award(s) presented: March 2020

Please direct questions to [email protected], noting Praxis in the subject line. Pre-applications and applications should be submitted to [email protected].

Sep
16
Mon
2020-2021 Fulbright US Scholar Program
Sep 16 all-day

The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is open and accepting applications for academic year 2020-2021!   Whether you plan to conduct independent research, teach students, or pursue a professional project, Fulbright makes a real and lasting impact. Fulbright Scholars return to their home institutions with enhanced career prospects, ideas for future collaborations, and a truly global perspective. Don’t miss out on this important opportunity to share knowledge and serve as a cultural ambassador through Fulbright. The deadline to apply to the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is September 16th, 2019.

 

There are many options for awards focusing on Anthropology and Archaeology including the following:

 

Australia: Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (The Australian National University)

Canada: Research Chairs in Indigenous Studies

Czech Republic: Fulbright-Palacky University Distinguished Chair

Egypt: American University in Cairo

India:  Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award (All Disciplines)

Peru: All Disciplines

Ukraine: Cultural Resource Management

Zambia: Multiple Disciplines – University of Zambia

 

For the full list of related awards, click here.

Join us for a live webinar focused on Fulbright US Scholar Program Opportunities including Anthropology and Archaeology. Register below:

Opportunities for U.S. Fulbright Scholar Applicants in Education and the Social Sciences

May 22, 2019 – 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program Team
Contact: [email protected]

Sep
25
Wed
ACLS King Fellowship to Support Pre-Columbian Art History
Sep 25 all-day

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) is pleased to announce the establishment of the H. and T. King Fellowship in Pre-Columbian Art History as part of our central ACLS Fellowship program. ACLS will begin naming King Fellows in 2020.

ACLS King Fellowships will support scholars whose research contributes to the understanding of art and its history in Pre-Columbian cultures of Latin America.

“We are enormously grateful to the King family for this generous contribution, which represents a new area for ACLS. We hope that this fellowship will foster innovative scholarship in the field of Pre-Columbian art history,” said Pauline Yu, ACLS president. The field of study is understood capaciously, to include material culture and architecture prior to European encounters, epigraphy, historical and documentary accounts, and ethnographic study that aids in our understanding of the visual culture of the period.

The fellowship will be awarded annually to scholars who apply through the central ACLS Fellowship program. ACLS Fellowships support research projects whose ultimate goal is a major piece of scholarly work. Awards range from $40,000 to $70,000 (depending on career stage) and are intended as salary replacement to help scholars devote six to twelve months to teaching and writing.

Application information will be available on our website by July 2019.

Contact: Matthew Goldfeder, [email protected]

Nov
1
Fri
2020-2021 Institute for Advanced Study Fellowships
Nov 1 all-day

Each year, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, invites around 25 scholars to be in residence for the full academic year to pursue their own research. The School welcomes applications in economics, political science, law, psychology, sociology and anthropology. It encourages social scientific work with an historical and humanistic bent and also entertains applications in history, philosophy, literary criticism, literature and linguistics. Applicants must have a Ph.D. at time of application. Each year there is a general thematic focus that provides common ground for roughly half the scholars; for 2020-2021 the focus will be “Science and the State.” The application deadline is November 1, 2019. Applications must be submitted through the Institute’s online application system, which opens June 1 and can be found, along with more information about the theme, at www.sss.ias.edu/applications.

Modern science and the modern state are inextricable and co-emergent. Indeed, the rise of the state form has been accomplished through the ways of knowing and extracting that scientific analysis makes possible—including classification, hierarchization, quantification, and reductionism. But while the production of science and the formation of the state are relatively well studied, much remains to be understood about the relationships between the two—how states support, use, and regulate sciences, and how the sciences support the structure, function, and legitimacy of states.

What have been the historical processes involved in the intertwined development of states and sciences, and how much have they varied across national contexts? While the state remains the driver of both private and public sector technoscience in certain societies, what has its role become in many others, where scientific innovation is increasingly seen as the purview of the private sector? As we today face issues and crises, from human gene-editing to climate change, that supersede provincial  boundaries—even  as  forms  of  violence and social control enabled by science continue to be operationalized by nation-states— what forms of transnational oversight may be required? How might state engagement with the natural and social sciences, such as the use of “nudge units” and “evidence- based” claims in legislation and governance, necessitate new understandings of the relationship between states and sciences? How does the corporate world respond to increasing demands  from both the state and citizens for social responsibility and ethical practice with regard to science and technology? These are some  of  the  questions  that will be addressed by the various disciplines of the social sciences and humanities.

Applications from scholars working outside the theme are also encouraged.

The program will be led by

Alondra Nelson, Harold F. Linder Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in collaboration with

Didier Fassin, James D. Wolfensohn Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study