Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jun
1
Sat
2019 Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Meeting
Jun 1 all-day

We are pleased to announce the Call for Participation for the 2019 Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Meeting, October 17-19 in Portland, Oregon.  Our conference theme is “The Profession of Sociological Practice.” Please see the text below and attached flyer.  We would appreciate it greatly if you would forward this mail to colleagues in your department, and others who may be interested in attending a professional conference dedicated to advancing the social and behavioral sciences in work, occupations, professions, and organizations, as well as networking with applied, clinical, and engaged public sociologists, and other professionals, at the 2019 AACS Annual Meeting.

Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Conference, October 17-19, 2019.  Portland, Oregon.  Theme: “The Profession of Sociological Practice.” In the last quarter century, applied and clinical sociologists have marshalled significant momentum  to “professionalize” sociological practice.  Join sociologists who serve the public in sundry occupations in the academic and non-academic workplace and professional marketplace.  Open to all sociologists, social and behavioral scientists, and professionals who use social and behavioral science in business and industry, government, and academia.  AACS Annual Meetings attract practicing sociologists and other professionals from around the world who know how to make a difference.

We don’t just present “papers” at AACS –  we look for innovation and creativity in content and presentation form.  Consider leading a professional development workshop, panel, roundtable, or poster session.  Proposals that address teaching with an applied focus are also invited.  Do you have a project to submit for the Social Design Award?  Learn More.  Program participants are invited to submit their presentations to the Journal of Applied Social Science, AACS’s Official peer-refereed journal, for publication.

AACS has a reputation as a student-friendly Association.  Our annual meetings offer mentoring opportunities for students.  Students who attend AACS Annual Meetings are encouraged to submit their papers for the Undergraduate and Graduate Student Paper Competition.  Student teams are welcome to participate in the Client Problem-solving Competition.

AACS pre-conference professional development workshops are available on Thursday afternoon for a modest additional charge for non-members.  Registration includes welcome and closing receptions, complimentary breakfasts by Embassy Suites with stay, keynote and presidential luncheons, and refreshments.

Deadline: June 1, 2019. For more information, please visit AACS at https://www.aacsnet.net/, and explore the Conferences tab.

2019 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition
Jun 1 all-day

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology announces our annual poetry competition as a means to encourage scholars to use alternative literary genres to explore anthropological concerns. These concerns may be any of those associated with any of the five fields of anthropology: Archaeological, Biological, Linguistic, Sociocultural and Applied.

Deadline: June 1, 2019.

There is no entry fee for this competition. Please email your entry of no more than three unpublished poems as a single pdf document to: [email protected] without the author’s name (anonymized), along with a separate cover page with the following information:

  • NAME, TITLE, INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION (S)
  • CONTACT INFO (ADDRESS, PHONE, EMAIL)
  • POEM TITLE (S)
  • ETHNOPOETRY STATEMENT*

The anonymous entry pdf must include an *ethnographic statement (of no more than 400 words) which connects the poem(s) submitted to anthropology which will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections. Examples of ethnographic statements can be found in the poems published in Anthropology and Humanism: (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anhu.12058/full).

Before you submit a manuscript to the competition, please consider exploring the work of the ethnographic poets we have published. We’re drawn to technical virtuosity combined with abundant imagination, vivid imagery, and musical approaches to fresh language, risk-taking, and an ability to convey penetrating insights into human experience. We seek a layer of trust concerning the writer’s experience and perspective as both anthropologist and creative writer, one who is ethically responsible in terms of representing the other, one who is able to locate his or her reader in the context of the ethnographic study and reveal anthropological themes associated with any of the fields of anthropology.

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, November 20-24, 2019. The first-place winner(s) will receive a certificate and award of $100. All entries will be considered for publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. (Note that Membership in AAA or an institutional subscription is required for digital access to the journal and SHA membership with the paid print option is required to receive a print issue.)

JUDGES: Ather Zia, Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor, Leah Zani & Nomi Stone

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2019 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition
Jun 1 all-day

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology is pleased to announce that we are opening our annual writing contest for Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction. We celebrate the use of creative literary prose genres to explore anthropological concerns, and we encourage you to share your work with us.

As a guideline, ethnographic fiction and creative nonfiction use literary elements to bring stories to life and engage the reader. Whether fiction or nonfiction, these creative prose pieces reflect insights about the real world seen through an anthropological lens or reflecting an anthropological sensibility (related to any field of anthropology).

Submissions should not exceed 20 pages typed double-spaced, and need to work as stand-alone stories. There is a limit of one submission per applicant.

We do expect contestants to be affiliated with the field or practice of anthropology and/or ethnography in some manner. There is no entry fee for this competition.

Submission deadline is June 1, 2019. Submissions must be previously unpublished and not currently under consideration elsewhere.

Please email your entry as two pdf documents to: [email protected]

The entry should consist of two files:

  1. Your story (double spaced) with title but without the author’s name (anonymized), PLUS an extra final page with a statement of no more than 400 words that answers the question: “How is this piece anthropologically informed and in what ways has your background in the field contributed to it?” This statement will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections.
  2. A separate cover page with your full name, title of your submission, mailing address, email address, and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

JUDGES: Julia Offen (Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Editor, Anthropology and Humanism), John Wood (Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville), Katrina Daly Thompson (Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison), Caitrin Lynch (Professor, Olin College), and Helle Bundgaard (Associate Professor, University of Copenhagen).

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized in a ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, November 20-24, 2019.

The first-place winner will receive an award of $100 and publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. The second-place winner will receive $75. And the third-place winner will receive $50. All winners will receive a certificate of their award.

Jun
16
Sun
CFP: Cologne Summer School of Interdisciplinary Anthropology IV
Jun 16 all-day

Call for Papers (Deadline June, 16th 2019)

Cologne Summer School of Interdisciplinary Anthropology IV

“Beyond Humanism: Cyborgs – Animals – Data Swarms”

23rd – 27th September 2019 University of Cologne

During the last five decades, public, intellectual, and academic debates have created an increased awareness of so-called transhumanist discourses and social movements accompanied by a diverse body of theoretical works in philosophy, social sciences, and humanities which can broadly be described as posthumanist. Building on a three year long tradition (CSIA 2015–17) of interrogating what it means to be human in the 21st century from an interdisciplinary anthropological perspective, the Cologne Summer School of Interdisciplinary Anthropology 2019 relaunches under the title Beyond Humanism: Cyborgs

– Animals – Data Swarms. It picks up where the last CSIA left by taking a closer look at what a trans- and posthumanist agenda actually implies and how it relates to classic understandings of what it means to be human.

Organized by the Collaborative Research Center 806 “Our Way to Europe” and the a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne, we invite PhD students and early postdocs from all disciplines whose academic interests follow similar perspectives and questions to join us for an intense week of interdisciplinary exchange and controversial discussion. Not simply dismissing new modes of humanisms as mere social phenomena in an age of accelerated technological and cultural transformation, we aim at taking them seriously in order to understand better the shifts in contemporary concepts and controversies about the human being.

By historically tracing back modes of humanism and their counterparts (e.g. post- and transhumanism, animism, multispecies assemblages, anthropocene, cosmopolitics, etc.) and by excavating their ontological and epistemological conditions, we identify three relational contestations of what it no longer means and three imaginaries of what it nowadays means to be human. The contestations are: (1) the distribution of human subjectivity and cognition, (2) the disintegration of human individuality, and (3) the dissolution of humanity as a unique ontological category.

The imaginaries we aim to bring into a fruitful contrast and comparison with these contestations are (1) the cyborg, (2) the animal, and (3) the data swarm. Taken together, relational contestations and imaginaries serve as interrogative tools for focusing on key questions ragarding the human/technology interface:

  • What are the multiple epistemological and ontological repercussions of transhumanist and posthumanist attempts to rethink and/or replace the human as cyborg, animal, or data?
  • How is the traditional understanding of the human as a subject belonging to a class of unique beings transformed if only one or two of the constituent properties (individual, subject, member of a unique class of beings) become contested? In other words: are post- and transhumanistic agendas, politics, and concepts more humanistic than proposed?
  • How are these new modes of humanism reflected in the arts and in public opinion? How do they transform everyday actions and perceptions of others (both human and non-human)?

Regarding scholarly inspirations we would like to mention such diverse theories as Donna Haraway’s materialist-feminist concepts of the cyborg and companion species/significant otherness (2016), Michael Tomasello’s evolutionary psychology (2014), Philippe Descola’s theory of animism (2013), Mario Blaser’s reconceptualization of cosmopolitics (2016), Nick Bostrum’s assumptions about singularity and super-intelligence (2014), Gregory Bateson’s ecology of the mind (1972), Gilbert Simondon’s technological humanism (1958; cf. Guchet 2010), Bruno Latour’s modes of existence (2012), and recent trends in the continental and analytical traditions to rethink panpsychism and materialism, such as Galen Strawson, Karen Barad, and Jane Bennett.

 

The five-day summer school is jointly organized by Thiemo Breyer (CRC 806 “Our Way to Europe”), Johannes Schick, Mario Schmidt (a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities), Christoph Lange (Department for Social and Cultural Anthropology), and Lars Reuke (Thomas Institute). It takes an interdisciplinary approach including perspectives from anthropology, philosophy, literature studies, and archaeology. Beyond these disciplines, we especially also encourage young researchers who develop interdisciplinary projects in visual and performing arts, informatics, engineering, design studies, cognitive, and the natural sciences to apply for our summer school.

Interested PhD students and early postdocs are invited to send their application (CV, draft of project, and motivational letter) to [email protected] before June, 16th 2019.

Limited travel funds for participants of universities from the ‚Global South‘ will be available.

For general questions and inquiries please contact [email protected] or visit Beyond Humanism: Cyborgs – Animals – Data Swarms.

Jun
20
Thu
CFP: Engaging Anthropology Conference
Jun 20 all-day

Engaging Anthropology
October 3-6, 2019
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department of Anthropology 50th Anniversary

As part of our 50th Anniversary celebrations, the Anthropology Department at the University of Massachusetts Amherst invites colleagues and collaborators, current students and alumni, faculty past and present, as well as scholars, practitioners, and activists near and far to join us for a four-day conference from October 3rd through October 6th.

At this moment of escalating precarity and deepening inequalities, of resurgent nativisms, social dislocations, and ongoing colonialism—and with climate change threatening life as we know it—we seek to explore how to mobilize anthropological theory and methods to make sense of and respond to these conditions. How might we identify and work toward alternatives?

We seek proposals for academic sessions, papers, workshops, and special events. We have also planned exciting plenaries, community engaged workshops, dinners and socials, and events that reflect on the history of the department.

 

Conference Events and Themes

Our conference theme, Engaging Anthropology, is meant to highlight the importance of ongoing engagements with the many challenges of the day. In line with our department’s history and the field’s diversity of orientations towards research, teaching, and practice, sessions around our theme of Engaging Anthropology might include any of these areas (though you need not limit your submissions to these areas).

  • Bio-Cultural Synthesis
  • New Directions in Archaeology and Social Justice
  • Marxism today
  • Engaged Pedagogy
  • Evolutionary Anthropology
  • Critical Heritage Studies
  • Activism and Organizing
  • Medical Anthropology and Global Health
  • Whiteness and Racism
  • Feminist & Queer Theory’s impact for Anthropology
  • Indigenous Epistemologies & Methods
  • Anthropology of Europe
  • Political Ecology and Environmental Anthropology

 

Plenaries

 

Distinguished Lecturer in the Anthropology of Europe

Lilith Mahmud, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California Irvine
 
Archaeology of the 21st Century

Jason De León, Professor of Anthropology and Chicana/o Studies, University of California, Los Angeles

Black Feminism Today

Whitney Battle-Baptiste, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Center, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Amanda Walker Johnson, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Dana-Ain Davis, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for the Study of Women and Society, Graduate Center, CUNY

Engaging the Present, Envisioning the Future

Arturo Escobar, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Stephen Healy, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Culture and Society at Western Sydney University and member of the Community Economies Collective.

Registration and Proposal Submission

You are invited to attend as a general participant.  We also seek papers, presentations, events, workshops, posters, and other activities that engage the discipline of anthropology in critical dialogue and mobilize anthropological theory and methods towards transformative practice.

Click here for general registration, abstract submission, and for more information.

https://umass.irisregistration.com/Site/Anthro

 

Please contact the conference planning committee at [email protected] with questions or for additional information.

Join the Facebook event site at https://www.facebook.com/events/225899184991945/ or visit the conference page for updates https://www.umass.edu/anthro/engaging-anthropology

Jun
27
Thu
Russell Sage Foundation Visiting Scholars Fellowship 2020-2021
Jun 27 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation

Visiting Scholars Fellowship for Academic Year 2020-2021

Application Deadline: June 27, 2019

The Visiting Scholars Program provides a unique opportunity for select scholars in the social, economic, political and behavioral sciences to pursue their research and writing while in residence at the foundation in New York City. The foundation annually awards up to 17 residential fellowships to scholars who are at least several years beyond the Ph.D. Visiting Scholars typically work on projects related to the foundation’s core programs and special initiatives. The fellowship period is September 1st through June 30th. Scholars are provided with an office at the foundation, computers, library access, supplemental salary support, and some limited research assistance. Scholars from outside NYC are provided with a partially-subsidized apartment near RSF. See http://www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply/visiting-scholars-program. Questions should be directed to James Wilson, Program Director, at [email protected].

Jul
1
Mon
American Institute of Indian Studies 2020-2021 Fellowships
Jul 1 all-day

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDIAN STUDIES
Fellowship Competition 2020-2021

 

Deadline:  1 July 2019

The AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF INDIAN STUDIES is a non-profit consortium of eighty-six American colleges and universities that supports the advancement of knowledge and understanding of India, its people, and culture. AIIS welcomes applicants from a wide variety of disciplines. In addition to applicants in the Humanities and Social Sciences AIIS encourages applicants in fields such as Development Studies, Natural Resources Management, Public Health, and Regional Planning.

 

Applications to conduct research in India may be made in the following categories:

Junior Research Fellowships . Available to doctoral candidates at U.S. universities in all fields of study. Junior Research Fellowships are specifically designed to enable doctoral candidates to pursue their dissertation research in India. Junior Research Fellows establish formal affiliation with Indian universities and Indian research supervisors. Awards are available for up to eleven months.

Senior Research Fellowships . Available to scholars who hold the Ph.D. or its equivalent. Senior Fellowships are designed to enable scholars in all disciplines who specialize in South Asia to pursue further research in India. Senior Fellows establish formal affiliation with an Indian institution. Short-term awards are available for up to four months. Long-term awards are available for six to nine months. A limited number of humanists will be granted fellowships paid in dollars funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Senior scholars may also apply for an AIIS/Ashoka University Research and Teaching Fellowship.

Senior Scholarly/Professional Development Fellowships . Available to established scholars who have not previously specialized in Indian studies and to established professionals who have not previously worked or studied in India. Senior Scholarly/Professional Development Fellows are formally affiliated with an Indian institution. Awards are for periods of six to nine months.

Senior Performing and Creative Arts Fellowships . Available to accomplished practitioners of the performing arts of India and creative artists who demonstrate that study in India would enhance their skills, develop their capabilities to teach or perform in the U.S., enhance American involvement with India’s artistic traditions, and strengthen their links with peers in India. Awards will normally be for periods of up to four months, although proposals for periods of up to nine months can be considered.

 

For more information please contact the American Institute of Indian Studies.

Telephone: (773) 702-8638.
Email: [email protected].
Web site: www.indiastudies.org

Sep
1
Sun
2019 Praxis Award Competition
Sep 1 all-day

Recognizing Excellence in Practitioner Anthropology

THE 2019 PRAXIS AWARD COMPETITION

Since 1981, the Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists’ (WAPA) biennial Praxis Award competition has recognized outstanding achievement in translating anthropological knowledge into action as reflected in a single project or specific endeavor. Ideal award candidates are anthropologists who can demonstrate the value of anthropological knowledge, theory and methods to solve problems addressed through public and/or private sector efforts (e.g., government, industry, or non-profit).

Award recipients will receive a $1000 prize and will be recognized at a Praxis Award ceremony and reception at the 2020 meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology. For further information, requirements, and a list of past award recipients, please see https://wapadc.org/praxis. A brief pre-application (2 pages) is encouraged. Both the pre-application and full application templates are available on the Praxis Awards Guidelines page.

The competition is open to anyone holding an MA or PhD in any subfield of anthropology. WAPA strongly encourages submissions from individuals, mixed-discipline groups, or organizations where at least one anthropologist worked on and influenced the designated project. Entries are encouraged from anthropologists worldwide. All entries will be evaluated by an expert panel of anthropological practitioners.

Key Dates:

  • Optional pre-application deadline: July 1, 2019
  • Full application deadline: September 1, 2019
  • Awardees and other applicants notified: January 2020
  • Praxis award(s) presented: March 2020

Please direct questions to [email protected], noting Praxis in the subject line. Pre-applications and applications should be submitted to [email protected].

Sep
7
Sat
CFP: South African Society for Critical Theory Conference
Sep 7 all-day

Contested Identities: Critical Conceptualisations of the Human

November 22–23, 2019

 

The South African Society for Critical Theory (SASCT) invites abstract submissions of up to 500 words for its 3rd Annual Conference which will take place at the Howard College Campus of the University of KwaZulu-Natal, from the 22nd to the 23rd of November 2019.

SASCT invites papers which address the vexed notion of the “human” in the contemporary age. As part of such considerations, this conference welcomes papers that consider the possibilities and pitfalls of identity theory in relation to Critical Theory. What analytic and conceptual resources does identity politics offer Critical Theory? What might a critical analysis of identity politics reveal? Do identity politics serve as an instance of a process whereby we come to view our own individuality in terms of pre-constructed cultural categories? What stance should Critical Theory adopt towards identity politics?

This conference also welcomes papers that explore the concept of “the human” and “human nature” from a critical perspective. What, for instance, might we construe as “essential” human characteristics? Is critical reason to be understood as such a characteristic? Is the question of the “human’ even meaningful any longer? Would the attempt to define the “human” in its present historico-social conditions enable us to map its future trajectory? Would the attempt to formulate such a definition facilitate liberation or merely serve a repressive ideological function? If the “human” or “human nature” are no longer meaningful categories, then what is it that Critical Theory aims to liberate? Has the technological mediation of existence altered our understanding of humanity? In short, what is the future of the “human”?

The conference welcomes approaches from all aspects of Critical Theory, broadly construed. In particular, the conference welcomes papers that address issues relating to: African Critical Theory, Digital Culture, the intersections between Critical Theory of European origin (Frankfurt School, Foucault, etc.), Black Existentialism, and Africana Critical Theory as well as contributions on any and all aspects of Critical Theory, e.g. the 3 generations of Frankfurt School Critical Theory, Postcolonial Theory, De-colonial Theory, Critical Feminism, Critical Film Studies, Critical Race Theory, Critical Theory of Technology, Critical Legal Studies, Post-structuralism, Psychoanalysis, Critical Hermeneutics, Liberation Theory, Critical Pedagogy, Critical Theology, Critical Anthropology, etc. 

The Conference organisers would also appreciate papers that address thinkers whose work lies outside the “canon” of Critical Theory, but whose work can extend current research in Critical Theory or whose work in itself embodies alternative forms of Critical Theory. Whilst the organisers encourage contributions that address the conference theme, the theme itself should be viewed as merely suggestive.

Please submit abstracts to [email protected] by the 7th September 2019 Acceptance letters will be sent by the 21st of September at the latest.

Should you have queries regarding any aspect of the conference then please do not hesitate to contact the conference organising committee.

Sep
16
Mon
2020-2021 Fulbright US Scholar Program
Sep 16 all-day

The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is open and accepting applications for academic year 2020-2021!   Whether you plan to conduct independent research, teach students, or pursue a professional project, Fulbright makes a real and lasting impact. Fulbright Scholars return to their home institutions with enhanced career prospects, ideas for future collaborations, and a truly global perspective. Don’t miss out on this important opportunity to share knowledge and serve as a cultural ambassador through Fulbright. The deadline to apply to the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program is September 16th, 2019.

 

There are many options for awards focusing on Anthropology and Archaeology including the following:

 

Australia: Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (The Australian National University)

Canada: Research Chairs in Indigenous Studies

Czech Republic: Fulbright-Palacky University Distinguished Chair

Egypt: American University in Cairo

India:  Fulbright-Nehru Academic and Professional Excellence Award (All Disciplines)

Peru: All Disciplines

Ukraine: Cultural Resource Management

Zambia: Multiple Disciplines – University of Zambia

 

For the full list of related awards, click here.

Join us for a live webinar focused on Fulbright US Scholar Program Opportunities including Anthropology and Archaeology. Register below:

Opportunities for U.S. Fulbright Scholar Applicants in Education and the Social Sciences

May 22, 2019 – 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm EDT

Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program Team
Contact: [email protected]