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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Apr
30
Tue
2019-2020 Hellenic Collection Library Research Fellowship Program
Apr 30 all-day

Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection

Library Research Fellowship Program, 2019-2020

 

Thanks to generous ongoing funding from the Elios Charitable Foundation and additional funding from the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Foundation, the University Library at California State University, Sacramento is pleased to announce the continuation of the Library Research Fellowship Program to support the use of the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection by fellows for scholarly research in Hellenic studies while in residence in Sacramento, CA. The Program provides a limited number of fellowships ranging from $1,000 to $4,000 to help offset transportation and living expenses incurred during the tenure of the awards and is open to external researchers anywhere in the world at the doctoral through senior scholar levels (including independent scholars) working in fields encompassed by the Collection’s strengths who reside outside a 75-mile radius of Sacramento. The term of fellowships can vary between two weeks and three months, depending on the nature of the research, and for the current cycle will be tenable from September 1, 2019-August 31, 2020. The fellowship application deadline is April 30, 2019. No late applications will be considered.

 

Consisting of the holdings of the former Speros Basil Vryonis Center for the Study of Hellenism, the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection is the premier Hellenic collection in the western United States and one of the largest of its kind in the country, currently numbering approximately 75,000 volumes. It comprises a large circulating book collection, journal holdings, electronic resources, non-print media materials, rare books, archival materials, art and artifacts. With its focus on the Hellenic world, the Collection contains early through contemporary materials across the social sciences and humanities relating to Greece, the Balkans, the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkey, and the surrounding region, with particular strengths in Byzantine, post-Byzantine, and Modern Greek studies, including the Greek diaspora worldwide. There is a broad representation of over 20 languages in the Collection, with a rich assortment of primary source materials. Since 2009 the collection has experienced particularly dramatic growth through several major gift acquisitions. For further information about the Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection, visit http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection.

 

For the full Library Research Fellowship Program description and application instructions, see: http://library.csus.edu/tsakopoulos-hellenic-collection/lrfp. Questions about the Program can be directed to George I. Paganelis, Curator, Tsakopoulos Hellenic Collection ([email protected]).

School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar
Apr 30 all-day

School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar: Women and Development in the Global South. Under a program supported by the Vera R. Campbell Foundation, SAR invites proposals for an Advanced Seminar that focuses on the circumstances of women in the developing world and offers paths to concrete, practical strategies for improving their health, prosperity, and general well-being.  Several of the seminar participants must be women scholars or scholars/practitioners from the developing world since one of the goals of the seminar is to foster professional linkages and the sharing of relevant experiences.  Proposals may address global problems or focus on specific regional questions.  Above all, the participants should be committed to producing practical improvements in the lives of women and workable proposals likely to achieve that end.  Seminars focused on broad policy issues will be judged according to whether practical implementation measures are included in the discussion.

The seminar chair(s) should plan to give a public presentation providing a broad overview of the project.  This presentation will be recorded and made available on SAR’s YouTube channel.

The deadline for applications is April 30, 2019.  For more information and how to apply: https://sarweb.org/seminars/campbell-seminar/

May
1
Wed
2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies
May 1 all-day

2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is pleased to announce that the 2019 ACIP workshop will be African Ethnographies. The project was proposed and will be organized by colleagues at the University of the Western Cape, Jung Ran Annachiara Forte (Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology) and Sakhumzi Mfecane (Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology and Sociology). Activities will take place in Cape Town, South Africa.

African Ethnographies
While the practice of ethnography has a long history in Africa, insufficient debate has emerged around it recently on the African continent. Far from being specific only to anthropology, ethnography has become a widespread mode of knowing inside and outside academic spaces. We would like to prompt reflection around this concept and practice, which is slippery, changing, dense, polysemic, and composed of a plurality of voices. The African Ethnographies workshop will raise questions about ethnography across disciplines, its contemporary forms – not exclusively written, and its publics. Ethnography enables conceptual work that transcends simple divides between the empirical, the methodological, and the theoretical. The workshop is particularly interested in understanding how ethnography and its conceptual work can allow us to grasp the complexities of contemporary African worlds, their precariousness, and their becomings. We are interested in exploring: (1) the work of theorization that ethnography makes possible; (2) understandings of public ethnography today; and finally (3) ways to re-rethink ethnography from the African continent. The workshop seeks to open a space of dialogue by bringing together emerging scholars across different disciplines and from institutions across Africa. By engaging in discussions around theory, methods, public engagements, and ethnographic sensibilities and modes of expression, we hope to better understand the challenges of doing ethnography in Africa’s contemporary worlds. The workshop will include a performance/ lecture that explores the performative potential of ethnographic work and will result in both an edited book and a film about ethnography based on the workshop and interviews with participants.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

Information about applying to organize the 2020 ACIP workshop and for the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards will be available in November 2018. The deadline for both workshop applications and student applications is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund.

2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award
May 1 all-day

 

The African Critical Inquiry Programme has named Mary Mbewe as recipient of the 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award. Mbewe is a Zambian student pursuing her PhD in the Department of History at the University of the Western Cape. Support from ACIP’s Ivan Karp Award will allow her to do research in London, Lusaka, and Mbala, Zambia for her dissertation project, From Chisungu to the Museum: a Historical Ethnography of the Images, Objects, and Anthropological Texts of the Chisungu Female Initiation Ceremony in the Moto Moto Museum in Zambia, 1931 to 2016.

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions, and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP Workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

 

About Mary Mbewe’s project

Mbewe’s project examines and reconstructs the histories of the photographs and objects of the chisungu female initiation ceremony of northern Zambia that were collected between 1931 and 1934 by the British anthropologist Audrey Richards and by the French Canadian missionary ethnographer Jean Jacques Corbeil in the 1950s. It tracks these items through the key moments of collection, circulation, archiving, accession, display and consumption, simultaneously seeing these photographs and things as objects, as records, and as containers of histories. This project is therefore a history of a hitherto unexplored instance of interrelated ethnographic research and a study of ethnography and histories of collection on a particular subject. It involves a renewed look at the work of an anthropologist and a missionary at different periods, each culminating in renowned publications, and whose photographs and objects have become iconic representations of the chisungu ceremony at the Moto Moto Museum in Zambia. This research project is conceived not only as a biographic study of these collections and histories, but also as a study of processes of meaning-making in a museum, which had its origins in particular colonial contexts and was formalised as a national museum in the post-colonial period. The research engages with how the photographs and objects have come to be constituted by the histories, museum and archival processes around them. It will contribute to debates around representing African culture, anthropological photographs, ethnographic objects, and museums in Africa, and more generally to museum studies, visual history, material culture studies, and the history of anthropology.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Information about the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards for African students enrolled in South African Ph.D. programmes will be available in November 2018. The application deadline is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards
May 1 all-day

AFRICAN CRITICAL INQUIRY PROGRAMME

“Who defines the needs of the people and the related epistemologies that serve them?” (Karp & Masolo 2000:10)

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

IVAN KARP DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARDS FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SOUTH AFRICAN Ph.D. PROGRAMMES

Closing Date: Wednesday 1 May 2019

The African Critical Inquiry Programme is pleased to announce the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards to support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled at South African universities and conducting dissertation research on relevant topics. Grant amounts vary depending on research plans, with a maximum award of ZAR 40,000.

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions, and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

 

ELIGIBILITY: The Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards are open to African postgraduate students (regardless of citizenship) in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Applicants must be currently registered in a Ph.D. programme in a South African university and be working on topics related to ACIP’s focus. Awards will support doctoral research projects focused on topics such as institutions of public culture, particular aspects of museums and exhibitions, forms and practices of public scholarship, culture and communication, and the theories, histories, and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship.

Applicants must submit a dissertation proposal that has been approved by their institution to confirm the award; this must be completed before they begin ACIP- supported on-site research or by December 2019, whichever comes first.

 

APPLICATION PROCESS: Awards are open to proposals working with a range of methodologies in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, including research in archives and collections, fieldwork, interviews, surveys, and quantitative data collection. Applicants are expected to write in clear, intelligible prose for a selection committee that is multi-disciplinary and cross-regional. Proposals should show thorough knowledge of the major concepts, theories, and methods in the applicant’s discipline and in other related fields and include a bibliography relevant to the research. Applicants should specify why an extended period of on-site research is essential to successfully complete the proposed doctoral dissertation. Guidance and advice on how to write a good proposal and budget can be found in the Resources section of the ACIP website (http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html) or here: http://www.ssrc.org/publications/view/the-art-of-writing-proposals/.

 

To apply, eligible applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (form below and online at  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  • abstract of the proposed research project (250 words maximum)
  • research proposal outlining the project’s goals, central questions, significance, and relevance for ACIP’s central concerns.  Proposals should include a clearly formulated, realistic research design and plan of work responsive to the project’s theoretical and methodological concerns. Applicants should provide evidence of appropriate training to undertake the proposed research, including the language fluency necessary for the project. Proposals should be no longer than 5 pages; they should be double spaced, with one inch margins and a font no smaller than 11 point. Applications that do not follow this format will not be considered.
  •  bibliography of up to two additional pages
  • project budget listing and justifying project expenses to be supported by the award
  • your curriculum vitae
  • current transcript
  • two referee letters; one of these must be from your supervisor. Your referees should comment specifically on your proposed project, its quality and significance, and your qualifications for undertaking it. They might also evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of your project and how you and your work would benefit from receiving the research award. Referee letters should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

Funding is to be used for on-site dissertation research; research cannot be at the applicant’s home institution unless that institution has necessary site-specific research holdings not otherwise available to the applicant. Applicants who have completed significant funded dissertation research by the start of their proposed ACIP research may be ineligible to apply to extend research time. Eligibility will be at the discretion of the ACIP Selection Committee, depending on completed research time and funding. Please note that the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards support dissertation research only and may not be used for dissertation write-up, tuition, study at other universities, conference

participation, or to reimburse debts or expenses for research already completed. The programme does not accept applications from Ph.D. programmes in Law, Business, Medicine, Nursing, or Journalism, nor does it accept applications from doctoral programmes that do not lead to a Ph.D.

 

SELECTION PROCESS: Applications will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee, an interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners drawn from a range of universities and cultural institutions. Selection will be based on the merit and strength of the application. Award amounts will vary according to project needs; the maximum award is ZAR 40,000. Awards will be made only if applications of high quality are received.

Notification of awards will be made by late July.

 

Successful applicants will be required to attend the African Critical Inquiry Workshop in the following year and will have opportunities to consult with scholars associated with the Workshop. They will be expected to attend subsequent ACIP Workshops while completing their dissertations, if possible. After completing their research, applicants must submit a final research report and a financial report.

 

Students who receive an Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award from the African Critical Inquiry Programme must acknowledge the support in any publications resulting from the research and in their dissertation. When the dissertation is completed, they must deposit a copy with the African Critical Inquiry Programme at the Center for Humanities Research.

 

 

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received on or before Wednesday 1 May 2019. Incomplete applications and applications that do not conform to format guidelines will not be considered.

 

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2019 Research Award Application” to  [email protected]

 

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html  https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

Call for Proposals to Organize a 2020 Workshop
May 1 all-day

AFRICAN CRITICAL INQUIRY PROGRAMME

“Who defines the needs of the people and the related epistemologies that serve them?” (Karp & Masolo 2000:10)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO ORGANISE A WORKSHOP

Closing Date: Wednesday 1 May 2019

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organise a workshop to take place in 2020. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions, and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular questions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational forms, or institutional forms from diverse methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that bring into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

 

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energise conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organisations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organisations, NGOs, or others appropriate to the topic. Abstracts for previously funded ACIP Workshops are available here.

 

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2020.
  • a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  •  a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  • a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organisers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape for basic financial administration and are responsible for complying with CHR policies. Workshop organisers should submit a letter from the host institution, centre, programme, or department confirming that appropriate administrative and institutional support will be available.

We ask Workshop organisers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organisers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organisations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches, or specialisations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply: Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  •  abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement defining the proposed Workshop theme and focus, its significance, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organising the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organiser)
  • institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop. Please describe available administrative and logistical support in this letter and/or your work plan
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organisation, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

 

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

 

Conceptualisation: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions, and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross- institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed Workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

 

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

 

Workshop organiser(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organising the Workshop, including previous administration/organisation and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds, and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

 

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

 

Applicants who organise an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research.

After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Wednesday 1 May 2019. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2020 Workshop Proposal” to [email protected]

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html  https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

CFP: Arctic Futures 2050 Conference
May 1 all-day

Call for Poster Abstracts

Arctic Futures 2050 Conference

4-6 September 2019

Washington, D.C.

Poster Abstract Submission Deadline: Wednesday, 1 May 2019

Poster Information and Abstract Submission Guidelines


The Arctic Futures 2050 Conference Organizing Committee invites abstracts for posters. The Arctic Futures 2050 Conference—convened by the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH: https://www.searcharcticscience.org)—will be an international conference designed to enhance collaboration between Arctic scientists from many disciplines, diverse Indigenous knowledge holders, and policy makers from all levels of government. The conference will be held 4-6 September 2019 at the National Academies of Sciences in Washington, D.C.

Poster sessions will be held during each day of the conference as an integral part of the agenda and expansion of the plenary sessions. Posters will offer opportunities to provide specific information relevant to the main themes of the conference, including:

  • Knowledge of the Arctic environment derived from field observations, Indigenous observations, laboratory measurements, or modeling.
  • Policy initiatives, activities, and methods—from all levels of government.
  • Descriptions of what we need to know to respond to a changing Arctic from Indigenous, scientific, or policy perspectives.
  • Tools or processes for informing policy with science or Indigenous Knowledge.
  • Tools or processes for informing knowledge holders and producers about policy needs.
  • Approaches that have supported collaboration across disciplines.
  • Ideas for addressing obstacles that limit collaboration across disciplines and geographies.
  • Other topics—relevant to collaborations needed to effectively respond to a changing Arctic environment—are welcome.

In addition, you may email [email protected] if you would like to present your work through another format, for example, through art or another creative platform.

Current sponsors of the Arctic Futures 2050 Conference include the National Science Foundation’s Arctic Sciences Section, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, and the American Geophysical Union. Conference partners currently include ArcticNetArctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS), and the Wilson Center’s Polar Initiative.

For more information about poster abstract guidelines and submission, go to: https://www.searcharcticscience.org/arctic-2050/conference-2019/submit-abstract

For more information about the Arctic Futures 2050 Conference, go to: https://www.searcharcticscience.org/arctic-2050/conference-2019

For more information about the conference, email Brendan P. Kelly, SEARCH Executive Director, at [email protected]. For questions about poster abstracts, email: AF[email protected]

May
15
Wed
NEH Infrastructure and Capacity Building Challenge Grants
May 15 all-day

NEH guidelines are now available for Infrastructure and Capacity Building Challenge Grants! Awards up to $750,000 in federal matching funds support capital expenditures, equipment & software, collections preservation & conservation, and existing digital infrastructure. These grants have a fundraising component and offer special encouragement to projects addressing the 250th anniversary of American independence and those from HBCUs, HSIs, TCUs, and community colleges. Optional drafts reviewed if sent by April 3. Questions welcome at [email protected] or 202-606-8309.

Deadline: May 15.

Sixth Biannual Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples’ Conference
May 15 all-day

Sixth Biannual Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples’ Conference
September 12-14, 2019, Gonzaga University, Spokane, WA, USA

Conference Website: www.gonzaga.edu/erip

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/360309841479769/

Proposals for individual papers, posters, pre-organized panels and roundtables can be submitted in Spanish, English, and Portuguese at the conference’s website.

Deadline for submission of proposals: May 15, 2019

About the Conference and Call for Papers

This conference is organized by the Ethnicity, Race, and Indigenous Peoples section of the Latin American Studies Association (ERIP-LASA), in collaboration with Gonzaga University and the Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies journal (LACES). ERIP has more than 400 members representing diverse academic disciplines, including anthropology, history, sociology, political science, linguistics, Spanish and Portuguese, geography, literature, and the law. ERIP is committed to the promotion of research, teaching, and the exchange of ideas about all topics related to ethnicity, race relations, Indigenous peoples, Afro-descendants and other ethnic or racial groups in Latin America, the Caribbean, and across the Americas.

The ERIP 2019 Conference provides an opportunity for academics, graduate students, activists and practitioners in all the relevant disciplines to present panel, paper, and poster proposals on issues related to ERIP’s mission and areas of interest in the study of Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Americas.

ERIP 2019 seeks to bring together scholars from across disciplines, community-based knowledge producers, and activists whose work addresses contemporary and historical conceptions of indigeneity, ethnicity, and race and how these notions intersect with various political, cultural, social, legal, and economic projects that have engendered divisions, inequities, violence, and dispossessions within and across nation-states and the hemisphere. Submissions might explore impacts and legacies of colonialism and decolonization, imperialism, state-formation, citizenship regimes, populism, neoliberalism, extractivism, democratization, and/or pluriculturalism; as well as historical and contemporary contexts of resistances, non-Western paradigms, insurgencies, and civic and social movements undertaken by Indigenous and minority communities across the Americas. ERIP 2019 intends to provide a forum for discussion, debate, and critical engagement with respect to best paths moving forward in the face of complex challenges facing our contemporary world. Panels, papers, and posters on topics that engage the conference theme, “Bridges and Walls Across the Americas: Dialogues of Survivance, Endurance, and Resistance” are especially welcome and encouraged.

Travel Grants: ERIP, LACES, and Gonzaga University have jointly established a fund to assist participants’ travel from Latin America and the Caribbean, on a competitive basis.  Instructions for travel grant applications can be found at the conference website: https://www.gonzaga.edu/ethnicity-race-indigenous-peoples-conference/registration/travel-grants

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THE CONFERENCE:
Email: [email protected]
Phone: +1 (509) 313-6783

May
23
Thu
2019 Russell Sage Foundation Programs and Initiatives
May 23 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation Programs and Initiatives Currently Accepting Letters of Inquiry (Deadline: May 23, 2019): Behavioral EconomicsRace, Ethnicity, and ImmigrationSocial, Political and Economic InequalityDecision Making and Human Behavior in ContextImmigration and Immigrant IntegrationSocial, Economic, and Political Effects of the ACA

The Russell Sage Foundation was established by Mrs. Margaret Olivia Sage in 1907 for “the improvement of social and living conditions in the United States.” The foundation now focuses exclusively on supporting social science research in its core program areas as a means of examining social issues and improving policies. Grants are available for research assistance, data acquisition, data analysis, and investigator time for conducting research and writing up results. Budget requests are limited to a maximum of $175,000 (including overhead) per project (max. 2 years). A detailed letter of inquiry must precede a full proposal. See http://www.russellsage.org/how-to-apply. Questions should be sent to [email protected].