Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Sep
24
Mon
Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’
Sep 24 – Oct 2 all-day

Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’

24 September-02 October 2019, Svaneti & Tbilisi, Georgia

Why are some places especially prone to associations with the supernatural? Might it be because of liminal geographies, of the complex histories of ancient human landscapes, of fear about what lurks in the darkness? Are communities’ beliefs shaped by the environments in which they live, or does the recurrence of certain belief across environmental and geographic divides suggest that place is ultimately irrelevant? When we read a book or watch a film with supernatural themes, is the setting just window dressing, or can the mountains, the palaces, the forests, the skyscrapers be characters in their own right?

Previous conferences in this series have been held on remote islands (Shetland’s North Isles, 2014), in a hyper-dense city-state (Macau, 2015), and in the polar night (Svalbard, 2017). In 2019, the conference will go farther and higher than ever before, venturing up into the wild mountain valleys of and ancient cities of Georgia, a country at the crossroads of East and West.

This conference considers the themes of 1) folk belief, legends, and vernacular religion and 2) the supernatural in literature and film. We will combine academic presentations with explorations of communities in Georgia’s Svaneti and Tbilisi regions. Special emphasis will be given to the question of the role that ‘place’ plays in the conceptions of the supernatural: from folk narratives to local religious traditions; from the monsters, fairies, and witches of cinema to the miraculous in literature. Could these tales and customs occur just about anywhere? Or do they take place in the just the place they need to be?    

How to make attend and make a presentation.

Presentations are welcome on all aspects of of either folk belief or the supernatural in literature and film, though we encourage delegates to address the theme of the role of place in conceptions of the supernatural.Presentations last 15 minutes and will be followed by around 5 minutes’ question time. Note that, due to the ‘remote’ location of the conference, audio-visual aids will not be available for presentations.

The first deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2018. (Later abstracts may be accepted if there is room available at the conference, but people who submit an abstract prior to the deadline will have the first opportunity to reserve a spot and to take advantage of the early registration rate.) You can submit your abstract here. The deadline for early registration is 30 November 2018.

Sep
27
Thu
German Studies Association: Call for Seminar Proposals
Sep 27 – Sep 30 all-day

GERMAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION: CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

The 42nd GSA Conference in Pittsburgh, PA (September 27–30, 2018) will continue to host a series of seminars in addition to conference sessions and roundtables.

Seminars meet for all three days of the conference. They explore new avenues of academic exchange and foster extended discussion, rigorous intellectual debate, and intensified networking. Seminars are typically proposed and led by two to three conveners and they consist of 12 to 20 participants, including scholars from different disciplines and at different career stages. Seminars may enable extended discussion of a recent academic publication; the exploration of a promising new research topic; engagement with pre-circulated papers; an opportunity to debate the work of scholars with different approaches; the coming together of groups of scholars seeking to develop an anthology; or the in-depth discussion of a political or public policy issue, novel, film, poem, artwork, or musical piece.

In order to facilitate extended discussion, seminar conveners and participants should participate in all three seminar meetings. Please note that seminar conveners and seminar applicants who have been accepted for seminar participation will not be allowed to submit a paper in a regular panel session. However, they may take on one additional role in the conference as moderator or commentator on another session independent of their enrollment in a seminar, or they may participate in a roundtable.

Although we accept proposals from conveners who have directed a seminar during the past two consecutive years, we give preference to newcomers and thus encourage the rotation of seminar conveners in similarly-themed seminars. We further recommend that those conveners contact the coordinators of the Interdisciplinary Network Committee, Professors Pamela Potter ([email protected]) and Winson Chu ([email protected]), to establish an official GSA Network on their topic.

The application process has two steps. Initially, we invite you to submit a preliminary proposal that includes the following items:

  1. Title
  2. Names of conveners
  3. A 150-word description of the seminar’s subject (which will eventually be used in the call for participants, the printed program, and the online program/mobile app)
  4. A 50-word description of the format of the seminar (which will also appear in the call for participants, etc.)

These items are due by November 13, 2017.

Please submit your application online at https://www.xcdsystem.com/gsa. Your username and password are the same ones you use to log in to your GSA profile at https://thegsa.org/members/profile. Please note that you must be a current member of the GSA to submit a proposal. If you need your password reset, please contact Ms. Ursula Gray ([email protected]) at Johns Hopkins University Press. If technical questions or problems arise with the submission interface itself, please contact Elizabeth Fulton at [email protected].

At this point, the GSA Seminar Committee will provide suggestions and assistance for the final submission, which is due by December 13, 2017. The committee will then review seminar proposals and post a list of approved seminars and their topics on the GSA website by early January 2018.

 

The GSA Seminar Committee consists of:

Margaret Eleanor Menninger (Texas State University) | [email protected] (Chair)

Maria Mitchell (Franklin & Marshall College) | [email protected]

Faye Stewart (Georgia State University) | [email protected]

Sep
30
Sun
Call for Panels: 16th RAI Film Festival 2019 Conference
Sep 30 all-day

16th RAI Film Festival 2019 Conference Call for Panels

[Deadline 30 September 2018]

The 16th RAI Film Festival will take place 27-30 March 2019 at the Watershed in Bristol (UK). Alongside this, the Royal Anthropological Institute is pleased to announce an accompanying conference:

Expanding the Frame: Ethnographic Film and its Others

Despite decades of trying, anthropologists have not managed to come to any settled agreement on what ethnographic film is or should be. Rather than being chained to the “classics” or a “canon”, anthropological filmmakers and ethnographic filmmaking have instead pushed for new approaches. These approaches continue to blur any presumed boundaries of the field. Increasingly, ethnographic film has sought to position itself in productive relationships alongside fellow travellers, including:

indigenous, diasporic, intercultural, African/black cinemas and experimental/art film

We invite panels that explore the boundaries of ethnographic film.

The aim of this conference is to provoke reflection on the relationship between ethnographic film and other filmmaking endeavours that are – or have the potential to be – constructive critical interlocutors. To what extent can ethnographic film practice creatively engage with other film traditions yet still retain its scholarly roots and aims? Does it need to?

The RAI welcomes panels on any aspect of the topic, whether theoretical or ethnographic. Amongst the possible (but not restricted to) areas which may be considered are:

– Recent debates on the relation between ethnographic film and cinematic traditions such as indigenous, diasporic, intercultural, African/black cinemas and experimental/art film
– Decolonizing documentary/ethnographic film
– Collaborative research and filmmaking practices
– Virtual & Augmented Reality, 360° filmmaking, interactive documentary and their affordances
– Intellectual ownership, copyright and authorship
– Digital and infrastructural divides
– Non-representational theories and practices
– Indigenous broadcasting/media and anthropology
– Global indigenous movements
– Indigenous, ethnic, and minority identities and film
– Film as performance, event and process
– Audience reception, film festivals and distribution practices

It is the intention of the organisers that this conference be integrated with the Festival, meaning that conference delegates will have the opportunity to attend the screenings, as well as speak at the conference.

Proposals for panels should be made by 30 September 2018 by filling out the online form.

Please direct any questions or queries to Caterina Sartori (RAI Film Officer): [email protected]

2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop
Sep 30 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop

Humanities Without Walls (HWW) is a consortium of humanities centers and institutes at 15 major research universities throughout the Midwest and beyond. Based at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), the HWW consortium is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In summer 2019, HWW is holding its second national, in-residence summer workshop for doctoral students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system. Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF)—a leading public humanities organization—designs and runs the summer workshop in consultation with HWW. Through a series of workshops, talks, and field trips, participants learn how to leverage their skills and training towards careers in the private sector, the non-profit world, arts administration, public media and many other fields.

We invite applications from doctoral students pursuing degree in the humanities and humanistic social sciences to participate in this three-week, in-residence summer workshop. This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be made to HWW by each university. To be considered, interested doctoral students must submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018.

About the Workshop: Launched in 2015 as an initiative of the HWW consortium, the workshop welcomes thirty participants each summer from higher education institutions across the United States. HWW Summer Workshop Fellows work in a variety of academic disciplines. They are scholars and practitioners who bring experience in community building, museum curation, filmmaking, radio programming, social media, project management, research, writing, and teaching. They are invested in issues of social justice and seek ways to bring humanistic values, insights, and skills to the public and private sectors.

In the spirit of practice-oriented learning, HWW and CHF partner with entities such as IDEO, a design and consulting firm, to lead students in real-world problem-solving exercises around important contemporary issues. Recognizing that each fellow’s skillset has been primarily oriented toward an academic track, the workshop includes sessions on values-based career planning, resume and cover letter construction, networking, and social media strategies from experts in career development.

Graduates from the workshop will emerge with a network of contacts in a range of professional realms; a significantly broadened sense of the career possibilities that await humanities PhDs; a cohort of HWW Summer Workshop Fellows (and friends!) from whom they may draw support and advice; and a set of resources aimed at helping them advance into the various realms considered under the broad rubric of “the public humanities.”

Where: Chicago, Illinois. Most weekday workshop events will take place at the Genevieve and Wayne Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church, 126 E. Chestnut St (at N. Michigan Ave.). The workshop also includes site visit to organizations around the city.

This is an in-residence workshop. As such, all participants, regardless of regular place of domicile, will be housed in private apartments. The costs of lodging are included in the fellowship. Staying in the provided housing is required as a condition of acceptance this fellowship. Details about lodging will be provided to those selected for the workshop.

When: Summer 2019—July 15th through August 2nd. Workshop sessions take place from approximately 9am to 5pm, Monday through Friday, for three weeks. Fellows are required to attend all workshop events and are strongly discouraged from traveling during the workshop. While there are no events scheduled during weekends, the CHF will circulate a list of interesting and exciting activities happening around Chicago that students are welcome to explore on their own.

Eligibility: All applicants must be enrolled in a doctoral degree program in a humanities or humanistic social science discipline at a PhD-granting institution within the United States. Applicants may be at any stage of their doctoral work, but they cannot have already received the doctoral degree at the time the workshop takes place. Ideally, applicants will have completed some coursework towards their doctoral degree, and they may have been advanced to candidacy but are not yet finishing their dissertations. International students are eligible to apply, but are responsible for confirming their registration and eligibility status at their home universities; HWW is not responsible for issuing visa paperwork.

Fellowship Prize: Each fellow will receive a $5,000 prize intended to cover travel to and from the summer workshop, most meals, and all incidentals. Fellows will be expected to arrange and pay for their own travel using the funds from this prize. The Chicago Humanities Festival will be arranging housing for all fellows in Chicago near the Gratz Center. All fellows are expected to attend the entire workshop for the entire three weeks and to stay in the provided housing.

Application Requirements: Interested doctoral students in the humanities should submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Combine and submit all application materials as a single PDF file.

The application file should contain:

  • A completed application cover sheet.
  • A narrative (1,000 words maximum) explaining the applicant’s intended career trajectory and addressing the following questions:
    • What is your experience with the “public humanities”?
    • Why are you interested in attending the workshop?
    • What kinds of knowledge are you seeking from the workshop?
    • What do you hope to achieve as a result of attending the workshop?
    • How do you envision sharing what you learn at the workshop with your department, campus, and beyond?
  • CV (two pages maximum),
  • Two letters of recommendation. One letter should be from the applicant’s primary adviser/dissertation chair; both should emphasize the applicant’s fit for this workshop.

Application Procedures: This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be subnitted to HWW from any given university.

Interested students must submit the application materials listed above to their universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Please do not submit your applications directly to HWW.

Humanities Center Directors, Graduate College Deans, or equivalents should submit the application for their nominee by 5:00 pm CDT on November 2nd, 2018. Applications should be submitted to [email protected] as a single PDF file attached to an email with the subject line “2019 Predoc Application.”

Announcement of fellowship awards will be made in January 2019. All questions should be directed to Jason Mierek, Director of Operations of the HWW Consortium, at [email protected].

Oct
5
Fri
Call for Applications: The Berlin Prize 2019/2020
Oct 5 all-day

The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2019/2020, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, questions of race in comparative perspective, and the interplay of exile and return.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester, but shorter stays of six to eight weeks are also possible. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

Fellowships are restricted to US citizens and permanent residents. Candidates in academic disciplines must have completed a PhD at the time of application. Candidates working in other fields—such as journalism, film, law, or public policy—must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers should have published at least one book at the time of application.

Please note that Berlin Prizes for visual artists, composers, and poets are determined in invitation-only competitions.

We will accept applications as of late May 2018. Following a peer-reviewed evaluation process, an independent Selection Committee reviews finalist applications. The 2019/2020 Berlin Prizes will be announced in late April 2019.

For further information and to apply online, please see: http://www.americanacademy.de/apply/apply-for-a-fellowship/

The application deadline for 2019/20 is Friday, October 5, 2018 (12 noon EST or 6 pm CET).

Oct
17
Wed
National Humanities Center Residential Fellowships, 2019-20
Oct 17 all-day

Become a Fellow at the National Humanities Center

The National Humanities Center will offer up to 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2019 through May 2020. Applicants must have a doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career and senior scholars are encouraged to apply. Emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work may also apply. The Center does not support the revision of doctoral dissertations.

In addition to scholars from all fields of the humanities, the Center accepts individuals from the natural and social sciences, the arts, the professions, and public life who are engaged in humanistic projects. The Center is international in scope and welcomes applications from scholars outside the United States. The National Humanities Center does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation, or age. We are dedicated to fair treatment, diversity, and inclusion.

Facilities and Services

The Center provides a rich intellectual setting for individual research and the exchange of ideas. Located in the progressive Triangle region of North Carolina, near Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh, the Center affords access to the vibrant cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. The stunning Archie K. Davis building includes private studies for Fellows, conference rooms, a central commons for dining, lounges, and reading areas.

The Center’s renowned library services provide Fellows with all necessary research materials. Prior to arrival, Fellows may arrange to have their home libraries essentially replicated in their Center studies so that all reference works and other frequently used sources are ready-to-hand from the outset. The Center’s library service supports Fellows by fulfilling thousands of requests for books and other research materials from our partner institutions in the Triangle, usually within 24 hours, and from libraries around the world.

Each year, scholars form their own seminars and study groups depending on cohort members’ shared research interests, although participation in these groups is always optional. Breakfasts and lunches are provided each weekday in the Center commons to ensure that scholars can get the most out of their uninterrupted research time and to foster conversations across disciplines in an informal and convivial setting. The Center also maintains a vibrant program of scholarly events and conferences and pursues an active public outreach program. Fellows are invited to participate in these activities and may contribute to the Center’s programs in humanities education and public engagement.

Areas of Special Interest

Most of the Center’s fellowships are unrestricted. Several, however, are designated for particular areas of research, including fellowships for environmental studies, English literature, art history, Asian studies, theology, and for early-career female philosophers. The Center also invites applicants from scholars in interdisciplinary fields, including African-American studies, area studies, bioethics, cultural studies, history of science and technology, film and media studies.

Stipends

The amounts awarded are individually determined, according to the needs of the Fellow and the Center’s ability to meet them. The Center seeks to provide half salary up to $65,000 with the expectation that a Fellow’s home institution will cover the remaining salary. The Center also covers travel expenses to and from North Carolina for Fellows and dependents living with the Fellow in North Carolina during the fellowship.

Support

Fellowships are supported by the Center’s own endowment, private foundation grants, contributions from alumni and friends, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

For More Information

Oct
24
Wed
2019-20 Mellon/ACLS Scholars & Society Fellowships
Oct 24 all-day

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) is pleased to announce a new initiative to advance publicly engaged scholarship in the humanities. The Mellon/ACLS Scholars & Society program, made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will support humanities scholars who seek to partner with nonacademic organizations in their research and encourage innovation in doctoral education at their universities.

Inspired by the Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows program, which demonstrates the dynamic value of doctoral education by placing recent humanities PhDs in top nonprofit and government organizations, the Scholars & Society program will encourage faculty to explore connections between humanities research and broader society while in residence at a US-based cultural, media, government, policy, or community organization of their choice. The fellowships also provide resources and training that will enable fellows to incorporate best practices of public scholarship into doctoral education on their campuses. ACLS developed the program in consultation with academic and nonprofit leaders with extensive experience in the realm of publicly engaged scholarship.

“Just as ACLS strives to increase funding for core humanities research through a variety of fellowship and grant programs, we also recognize the urgent need to promote the broader circulation of that knowledge across all sectors of society,” said John Paul Christy, director of public programs at ACLS. “We look forward to supporting scholars who can be ambassadors for the humanities beyond their campus communities, and who will instill an ethos of reflective public engagement in their scholarship for years to come.”

The fellowships are open to faculty who hold tenured positions in PhD-granting departments or programs at universities in the United States. In the pilot year of the program, ACLS will award 12 fellowships for the 2019-20 academic year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $75,000, plus funds for research, travel, and related project and hosting costs.

The goal of the fellowship year should be a major research project in the humanities or humanistic social sciences that treats a significant issue in society, such as democratic governance; technological change; racism and inequality; environmental change; economic exclusion; or migration and immigration, to name just a few possibilities. Fellows will select host organizations based on their capacity to advance their research.

Fellows will participate in two workshops over the course of the fellowship year. These workshops will encourage collaboration between scholars and organizations engaged in public scholarship and will support institution-building efforts to train humanities faculty and doctoral students who are interested in developing research agendas that have purchase both inside and outside of the academy.

Proposals must be submitted through ACLS’s online application system, which will begin accepting applications in late July. Further information about the program, including eligibility criteria and FAQ, is available online here. The application deadline is October 24, 2018.

Contact: [email protected]

Nov
30
Fri
Beta Analytic’s First Ever Carbon-14 Date Raffle
Nov 30 all-day

Radiocarbon Date Raffle

To support young researchers around the world, we are giving away vouchers for five AMS dates.

Eligibility: Open to all undergrad and postgrad researchers

Allowed number of entries per student: 1

Selection Process: Random Draw

Number of Winners: 5 (1 student from a university in Europe, 1 in Asia Pacific, 1 in Africa, 1 in South America and 1 in North America)

About the Prize:

Prize: 1 standard AMS date worth US$595 (standard turnaround time of 14 business days, valid until December 31, 2019)

Vouchers are non-transferrable.

Winners are required to show proof of enrollment for any semester in 2018.

Important Dates:

Deadline to join: November 30, 2018

Announcement of winners: December 10, 2018

Winners will be notified by email on December 10, 2018. This page will also be updated to add the names of the 5 winners.

Questions: Email [email protected]

Beta Analytic’s Privacy Policy is found here.

Dec
1
Sat
Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy Research Grant in the Social Sciences
Dec 1 all-day

The Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy was established in 1997 to support the advancement of research and understanding in the major fields of the social sciences, which include psychology, anthropology, sociology, economics, urban affairs, area studies, and political science.

Through its grants program, the foundation awards grants of $7,500 — $5,000 at the start of the project and $2,500 at its completion — to Ph.D. candidates in support of dissertations that address contemporary issues in the social sciences. Special Awards are offered to grant recipients for the most outstanding research project in specific subject-matter areas. Recipients of these awards receive an additional $1,500 – $5,000.

Applicants are not required to be a citizen or resident of the United States; however, grants are limited to aspiring PhD students at the dissertation level whose project has received approval from their appropriate department head/university

Dec
4
Tue
AAS2018: Life in an Age of Death
Dec 4 – Dec 7 all-day

AAS2018: LIFE IN AN AGE OF DEATH

4-7 December, 2018

James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia

During the first decades of the twenty-first century, the proliferation of life as a generative possibility has become marked by the spectre of death, closure, denial and ends. Ours is an era of precarity, extinction, militarised inequality, a seemingly boundless war on terror, the waning legitimacy of human rights, a rising consciousness of animal cruelty and consumer complicity in killing and suffering, and the global closure of decolonial and socialist windows of emancipation. Artificial intelligence and post-human technology-flesh interventions have become sources of existential threat to be secured against, rather than means of freeing, or otherwise expanding life. Mbembe (2003) first developed the notion of necropolitics in relation to ‘assemblages of death’, zones where technology, economy and social structures bind together to reproduce patterns of extreme violence. Following Foucault, he envisaged a distribution of the world into life zones and death zones. While we can readily identify zones of life and death on these terms, the imaginaries of death have increasingly colonised life zones.

This conference seeks to embrace this moment in history in all its roiling complexity, challenge, and specificity. It asks what accounts for this current interest in the spectre of Death in the anthropological imagination? What sorts of life—social, cultural, technological, creative—emerge in spaces pregnant with death and other life-ending spectres? What new horizons of fear, hope and possibility emerge? What kinds of new social formations, subjectivities and cultural imaginaries?

What social and cultural forms might an affirmative biopolitics, where the power of life is regained from the spectre of death, take? What new strategies of engagement, activism and refusal?

What can anthropology specifically bring to these emergent and often-interdisciplinary zones of urgency? How might our methods, theories and orientations be re-tooled and re-energised for these shadowed times?

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Refugee camp life, detention centres, border zones
  • New interspecies alliances
  • Securitisation of the internet of things
  • Agriculture and food in relation to animal cruelty and environmental degradation
  • Militarisation of urban space and zones of expulsion
  • Affective ecologies
  • Terms of the biopolitical across species, taxa
  • Aging populations
  • Securitising life, normalised insecurity
  • The medical body and social body technologies
  • Death of the fight for the internet
  • Reimagining the museum
  • Mediated death and the digital
  • Indigenous deathscapes
  • Posthuman experiments in and experiences of technology in the flesh
  • Autonomous systems
  • Memory, affect and imaginaries of life
  • Affirmative and critical biopolitics

For further information please see:

https://www.aasconf.org/2018/call-for-panels

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Panels and roundtables: 5 April to 7 May
Call for Papers, Labs: 21 May to 22 June
Early Bird registration opens: 10 August
Standard registration opens: 29 September