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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

May
30
Wed
Call for Papers: The Social Life of Deportation Regimes
May 30 all-day

The Social Life of Deportation Regimes: Interrogating the Implementation Interface 

Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences

Athens, 5-6 October 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

The study of deportation regimes has been on the rise in recent years, partly because deportation has not been successful in achieving its declared goal. There is little evidence from countries worldwide that deportation regimes manage to remove more than a tiny fraction of the population of illegalized migrants and rejected asylum seekers. Instead, deportation regimes should be seen, first and foremost, as a state mechanism for the production of deportable Others. The production of a deportable population within nation-states serves a wide spectrum of interests: it provides the national economy with cheap and unprotected labor, it scapegoats “illegal migrants” as the new “enemy” of the state and society, it boosts the securitization industry and it beefs up the state bureaucracy by increasing surveillance, militarizing borders and executing detention and deportation.

The functioning of deportation regimes relies on the construction of a physical and legal infrastructure, on the work of committed civil servants, and on the fashioning of an ideological narrative that legitimizes its operation. At the same time, the running of state deportation regimes calls on multiple collaborations with civil society (e.g. managing so-called voluntary returns), private companies (e.g. operating detention centers), and other states (e.g. bilateral agreements). It is this meso-level of deportation regimes – the people that de facto implement them in various moments and sites – that is of interest to us. Given the disproportionality between the “crime” (not having administrative documents in order) and the sanction (becoming deportable Other), between legality and legitimacy, between abstract policies and concrete cases, we seek to interrogate the practices, views, narratives, ethical frames, and rationalizations of those who constitute the social life of deportation regimes.

We welcome papers that engage the work of different actors along the “deportation continuum” (Kalir & Wissink 2016) and that are located at different sites along the “deportation corridor” (Dortbohm & Hasselberg 2015). We are especially interested in studies that shed light on how practices at the meso-level produce implementation deficits/surpluses and shape the de facto ways in which deportation is operated as a state project and in the lives of people who work for or are subjected to it. We appreciate proposals for panels or individual papers on all aspects of deportation, including the following:

  1. Illegalizing migrants and rejecting asylum seekers (crimmigration, legal activism, local regulations)
  2. Policing deportable subjects (raids, arrests, identification, deterrence)
  3. Running detention centers and alternative facilities (guards, social workers, medical staff, volunteers)
  4. Deporting illegalized migrants (operational units, bureaucracies, diplomatic agreements)
  5. Facilitating so-called voluntary returns and pay-to go schemes (NGOs, municipalities, IOM)
  6. Managing borders (prevention of entry, hot returns, refoulment at the border, waiting zones)
  7. Using technologies (smart borders, biometric identifications, sharing databases)
  8. Caring for the deportable (volunteers, shelters, medical treatment, inclusionary initiatives)
  9. Mobilizing against deportations and/or detention (activists, social movements, NGOs, academics)
  10. Countering illegalization of Others (regularization schemes, sanctuaries, rebel cities, legal activism)

Paper abstracts, full panel abstracts and workshop outlines should be sent to Ioana Vrabiescu and Ilan Amit at: [email protected] by 30th of May 2018. 300 words abstracts should include affiliation of the author(s). Decisions will be communicated by 15th of June. Draft papers should be submitted by 10th of September.

Jun
1
Fri
2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition
Jun 1 all-day

2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology announces our annual poetry competition as a means to encourage scholars to use alternative literary genres to explore anthropological concerns. These concerns may be any of those associated with any of the five fields of anthropology: Archaeological, Biological, Linguistic, Sociocultural and Applied. Deadline: June 1, 2018. There is no entry fee for this competition. Please email your entry (no more than three unpublished poems) as a single pdf document to: [email protected] without the author’s name (anonymized), along with a separate cover page with the following information by the Deadline of June 1, 2018:

  • NAME, TITLE, INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION (S)
  • CONTACT INFO (ADDRESS, PHONE, EMAIL)
  • POEM TITLE (S)
  • ETHNOPOETRY STATEMENT*

The anonymous entry pdf must include an *ethnographic statement (of no more than 400 words) which connects the poem(s) submitted to anthropology which will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections. Examples of ethnographic statements can be found in the poems published in Anthropology and Humanism: (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anhu.12058/full).

Before you submit a manuscript to the competition, please consider exploring the work of the ethnographic poets we have published. We’re drawn to technical virtuosity combined with abundant imagination, vivid imagery, and musical approaches to fresh language, risk-taking, and an ability to convey penetrating insights into human experience. We seek a layer of trust concerning the writer’s experience and perspective as both anthropologist and creative writer, one who is ethically responsible in terms of representing the other, one who is able to locate his or her reader in the context of the ethnographic study and reveal anthropological themes associated with any of the fields of anthropology.

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose in November 14-18, 2018. The first-place winner(s) will receive a certificate and award of $100. All entries will be considered for publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. (Note that Membership in AAA or an institutional subscription is required for digital access to the journal and SHA membership with the paid print option is required to receive a print issue.)

JUDGES: Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor, Nomi Stone, & Ather Zia 

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition
Jun 1 all-day

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology is pleased to announce that we are opening our annual writing contest for Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction. We celebrate the use of creative literary prose genres to explore anthropological concerns, and we encourage you to share your work with us.

As a guideline, ethnographic fiction and creative nonfiction use literary elements to bring stories to life and engage the reader. Whether fiction or nonfiction, these creative prose pieces reflect insights about the real world seen through an anthropological lens or reflecting an anthropological sensibility (related to any field of anthropology).

Submissions should not exceed 20 pages typed double-spaced, and need to work as stand-alone stories. There is a limit of one submission per applicant.

We do expect contestants to be affiliated with the field or practice of anthropology and/or ethnography in some manner. There is no entry fee for this competition.

Submission deadline is June 1, 2018. Submissions must be previously unpublished and not currently under consideration elsewhere.

Please email your entry as two pdf documents to: [email protected] The entry should consist of two files:

  1. 1)  Your story (double spaced) with title but without the author’s name (anonymized), PLUS an extra final page with a statement of no more than 400 words that answers the question: “How is this piece anthropologically informed and in what ways has your background in the field contributed to it?” This statement will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections.
  2. 2)  A separate cover page with your full name, title of your submission, mailing address, email address, and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

JUDGES: Julia Offen (Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Editor, Anthropology and Humanism), John Wood (Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville), Katrina Daly Thompson (Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison), and Caitrin Lynch (Professor, Olin College)

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized in a ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose, CA 11/14/2018 – 11/18/2018.

The first-place winner will receive an award of $100 and publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. The second-place winner will receive $75. And the third-place winner will receive $50. All winners will receive a certificate of their award.

Jun
15
Fri
2018 Symposium on Muslim Philanthropy & Civil Society
Jun 15 all-day

GENERAL CALL FOR PROPOSALS
2018 Symposium on Muslim Philanthropy & Civil Society

The Muslim Philanthropy Initiative at the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University invites scholarly papers for its second Symposium on Muslim Philanthropy and Civil Society to be held in Indianapolis, IN on October 2 and 3, 2018. The Symposium is being held in partnership with the Center on Muslim Philanthropy, Lake Institute on Faith & Giving and the International Institute of Islamic Thought. Articles from the Symposium that will successfully undergo double-blind-peer review will be published in a future issue of the Journal of Muslim Philanthropy & Civil Society, a bi-annual, peer reviewed, open access journal published by the Center on Muslim Philanthropy in partnership with Indiana University Press, IUPUI University Library Center for Digital Scholarship, and the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University.

The Symposium will focus on examining the broad scope of Muslim philanthropy and civil society. The Symposium is designed to foster and disseminate groundbreaking research on the intersection of the role of philanthropy and the other activities of Muslims as faith-based actors. The terms “Muslim” and “philanthropy” are defined broadly to be inclusive of cutting-edge research from across the world and disciplines. By “Muslim” philanthropy, we mean philanthropic activity of any kind, which involves self-identifying Muslim individuals, institutions, communities, and societies as key agents in shaping the context and content of this activity. “Philanthropy” includes practices of generosity ranging from the activity of discrete individuals of all socio-economic backgrounds to that of not-for-profit organizations, social movements, and a variety of other forms of civic engagement. The Symposium is intended to shed light on the dynamic practice and understanding of Muslim Philanthropy.

We also seek papers that focus on nonprofit organizations, civil society, volunteerism, social movements, philanthropy and related areas related to Muslim majority countries. These articles may not have a direct link to Muslim philanthropy theologically but will be accepted as area studies articles.

We seek to draw proposals by researchers from across disciplines (History, Political Science, Religious Studies, Sociology, Public Affairs, Nonprofit Management, Business, Philanthropy, etc.) and practitioners throughout the world working in this emerging field.

A 500-word proposal is due by no later than June 15, 2018. Accepted proposals will be notified by June 21, 2018. Papers will be required to be submitted on September 15, 2018. Ten selected papers will be awarded up to $1,000 to be used toward travel to present the paper at the Symposium. After the symposium, presenters are asked to submit their full manuscripts by October 30 to be considered for publication in the Journal. Papers must be no more than 7500 words including citations, footnotes and bibliography using the APA style with parenthetical citations.

For further questions or proposals, please contact Managing Editor Rafia Khader at [email protected]

The Journal is edited by Dr. Scott Alexander of Catholic Theological Union and Dr. Shariq Siddiqui of the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at Indiana University and Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA).

Jun
30
Sat
Seventh Anthropological Film Festival at The Jerusalem Cinematheque
Jun 30 all-day

The Seventh Anthropological Film Festival at The Jerusalem Cinematheque is on its way (November 2018) and we are now open for entries.

We would be very happy to get your films 2017–2018

The registration deadline is June 30th, 2018

Eligibility requirements are:

  • Screeners must be submitted online vimeo private link valid until June 30th 2018,  to my mail address: [email protected] 
  • Works must be subtitled in English
  • Works previously refused by the Anthropological Film Festival- Jerusalem can not be resubmitted.
  • A list of the selected films will be available via our website homepage in early September 2018.

The Festival selects films that document and explore human societies and cultures in their many facets, such as, social and cultural diversity, continuity and change, relationship with the environment and to promote dialogue between cultures.

We welcome submissions of documentary films made by anthropologists, students, and professional filmmakers; we welcome films at least 45min. long all varieties and styles of filmmaking.

The festival is a joint project of the Jerusalem Cinematheque-Israel Film Archive and the Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

Call for Proposals: Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life
Jun 30 all-day

Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life

ABOUT THE SERIES:

How are urban processes entangled with human experiences? In this series, scholarly monographs and edited volumes explore this question and illuminate diverse forms of such entanglement through empirically-based research. This series emphasizes anthropological approaches to the study of human life in relation to the urban. It seeks to illuminate experiences and effects of urban cultures and situate specific cases in a comparative set. By exploring the intricacies of human-urban relations, this series contributes to better understanding of the ways that humans particularly conceive of and experience nature, personhood, ethics, culture, and social life.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

To submit a manuscript for consideration by Lexington Books, please send:

  • a prospectus (see below for details)
  • a detailed table of contents
  • one or two sample chapters
  • your curriculum vitae

If you are proposing a contributed volume, please include titles, affiliations, and brief resumes for each of the contributors, as well as chapter abstracts.

The prospectus should include:

  1. A description of the book, describing the core themes, arguments, issues, goals, and/or topics of the work, what makes it unique, what questions it seeks to answer, and why you are qualified to write it. (2-5 pages)
  2. A description of your target audience (undergraduate or graduate students? scholars? professionals?).
  3. An analysis of competing or similar books (including publishers and dates), indicating distinctive and original elements of your project that set it apart from these other works.
  4. A list of courses in which your book might be used as a text or supplementary text, indicating the course level at which this book may be used.
  5. An indication of whether any part of your manuscript has been published previously, and if it is a doctoral dissertation, what changes you are proposing to prepare it for publication.
  6. The length of the manuscript either as a word count or a page count (12-point type on double-spaced 8.5”×11” pages). Will there be figures, tables, or other non-text material, and, if so, approximately how many? If the text is not complete, please still estimate its final length, not including the non-text material.
  7. If the manuscript is not complete, an estimation of when it will be finished. Is there a particular date by which you hope the book will be published (due to a historical anniversary, conference, etc.?
  8. The names of four to seven respected scholars in your field with whom you have no personal or professional relationship. Include their titles, affiliations, e-mail addresses, and/or mailing addresses.
  9. An indication of whether the manuscript is under consideration by other publishers.

Please do not send your entire manuscript.

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Jessica Bodoh-Creed is lecturer of anthropology at California State University.

Melissa King is assistant professor of anthropology at San Bernardino Valley College

Leonido Gines Jr. is lecturer of architecture at De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, and founder of studioGINES.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact: Jessica Bodoh-Creed ([email protected]), Leonido Gines Jr. ([email protected]), and Melissa King ([email protected])

Jul
5
Thu
2018 William T. Grant Scholars Program
Jul 5 all-day

Just released, the 2018 William T. Grant Scholars Program Application Guide for early career researchers! The Guide details our research focus areas, as well as case examples, eligibility requirements, application procedures, submission instructions, and selection criteria for Scholars awards.The program funds five-year research and mentoring plans that significantly expand researchers’ expertise in new disciplines, methods, and content areas.

The online application opens on April 23, and the deadline to submit an application is July 5, 2018, 3:00 PM EST.

 

Jul
26
Thu
2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society
Jul 26 – Jul 29 all-day

Call for Papers, Posters, and Organized Sessions: 2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society Portland, Oregon

July 26‐29, 2018

MEETING THEME: Science in Society, Society in Science – Toward a 21st Century Model for Social Scientific Research

Growing public skepticism about the value of science and expert knowledge has been a defining characteristic of the early 21st century. Critiques of science come from many sources – populist anti‐elite social movements, academic studies of conventional scientific methods and institutions, and advocates for a more participatory approach to knowledge production. As the distinction between ‘facts’ and ‘values’ has become blurred, the evidence‐base that informs current policy becomes increasingly contested territory. Notably, social scientists have long relied on evidence and scientific research to challenge popular misunderstandings of social problems like poverty, crime, racism, and sexism. At the same time, they have been at the forefront of critiques of the mainstream scientific enterprise and helped pioneer new approaches to research and engagement.

Professional social science societies (like RSS) have an obligation to support those who are studying and developing effective responses to the challenges faced by rural people and places in a globalized world. New models for scientific research will be increasingly important if our efforts are to inform public discourse and shape the development of effective public policies. To do this, we need to reconcile tensions between the desire to retain the power and insights of rigorous scientific methods, and our awareness of the societal biases associated with conventional scientific institutions. At the 2018 Annual Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, we particularly encourage attendees to present work that explores this vexing and enduring issue, and to provide examples of innovative approaches to applied scientific research on rural topics.

Over the last 80 years, the annual meetings of the RSS have been a venue for the exchange of ideas and information about a wide range of rural issues. Our attendees include faculty and students from diverse colleges and universities, researchers working in government or nonprofit institutions, and rural activists and practitioners. In addition to presentations on the meeting theme, we always invite presentations of research and engagement focused rural people, places and themes from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives.

Abstracts: Abstracts should be approximately 350‐500 words and briefly outline the purpose and theoretical framing of the paper, poster, program, or organized session. Where appropriate, include information about methods, data, and preliminary findings. The deadline for submitting papers, posters and sessions is Thursday, February 1, 2018, 11:59 pm (EST).

To submit, visit the “Annual Meetings” tab on the RSS website, www.ruralsociology.org.

Please contact the Program Chair, Kate MacTavish ([email protected]) or the RSS Business Office ([email protected]) with any questions about submission or to explore ideas for special events at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Sep
24
Mon
Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’
Sep 24 – Oct 2 all-day

Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’

24 September-02 October 2019, Svaneti & Tbilisi, Georgia

Why are some places especially prone to associations with the supernatural? Might it be because of liminal geographies, of the complex histories of ancient human landscapes, of fear about what lurks in the darkness? Are communities’ beliefs shaped by the environments in which they live, or does the recurrence of certain belief across environmental and geographic divides suggest that place is ultimately irrelevant? When we read a book or watch a film with supernatural themes, is the setting just window dressing, or can the mountains, the palaces, the forests, the skyscrapers be characters in their own right?

Previous conferences in this series have been held on remote islands (Shetland’s North Isles, 2014), in a hyper-dense city-state (Macau, 2015), and in the polar night (Svalbard, 2017). In 2019, the conference will go farther and higher than ever before, venturing up into the wild mountain valleys of and ancient cities of Georgia, a country at the crossroads of East and West.

This conference considers the themes of 1) folk belief, legends, and vernacular religion and 2) the supernatural in literature and film. We will combine academic presentations with explorations of communities in Georgia’s Svaneti and Tbilisi regions. Special emphasis will be given to the question of the role that ‘place’ plays in the conceptions of the supernatural: from folk narratives to local religious traditions; from the monsters, fairies, and witches of cinema to the miraculous in literature. Could these tales and customs occur just about anywhere? Or do they take place in the just the place they need to be?    

How to make attend and make a presentation.

Presentations are welcome on all aspects of of either folk belief or the supernatural in literature and film, though we encourage delegates to address the theme of the role of place in conceptions of the supernatural.Presentations last 15 minutes and will be followed by around 5 minutes’ question time. Note that, due to the ‘remote’ location of the conference, audio-visual aids will not be available for presentations.

The first deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2018. (Later abstracts may be accepted if there is room available at the conference, but people who submit an abstract prior to the deadline will have the first opportunity to reserve a spot and to take advantage of the early registration rate.) You can submit your abstract here. The deadline for early registration is 30 November 2018.

Sep
27
Thu
German Studies Association: Call for Seminar Proposals
Sep 27 – Sep 30 all-day

GERMAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION: CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

The 42nd GSA Conference in Pittsburgh, PA (September 27–30, 2018) will continue to host a series of seminars in addition to conference sessions and roundtables.

Seminars meet for all three days of the conference. They explore new avenues of academic exchange and foster extended discussion, rigorous intellectual debate, and intensified networking. Seminars are typically proposed and led by two to three conveners and they consist of 12 to 20 participants, including scholars from different disciplines and at different career stages. Seminars may enable extended discussion of a recent academic publication; the exploration of a promising new research topic; engagement with pre-circulated papers; an opportunity to debate the work of scholars with different approaches; the coming together of groups of scholars seeking to develop an anthology; or the in-depth discussion of a political or public policy issue, novel, film, poem, artwork, or musical piece.

In order to facilitate extended discussion, seminar conveners and participants should participate in all three seminar meetings. Please note that seminar conveners and seminar applicants who have been accepted for seminar participation will not be allowed to submit a paper in a regular panel session. However, they may take on one additional role in the conference as moderator or commentator on another session independent of their enrollment in a seminar, or they may participate in a roundtable.

Although we accept proposals from conveners who have directed a seminar during the past two consecutive years, we give preference to newcomers and thus encourage the rotation of seminar conveners in similarly-themed seminars. We further recommend that those conveners contact the coordinators of the Interdisciplinary Network Committee, Professors Pamela Potter ([email protected]) and Winson Chu ([email protected]), to establish an official GSA Network on their topic.

The application process has two steps. Initially, we invite you to submit a preliminary proposal that includes the following items:

  1. Title
  2. Names of conveners
  3. A 150-word description of the seminar’s subject (which will eventually be used in the call for participants, the printed program, and the online program/mobile app)
  4. A 50-word description of the format of the seminar (which will also appear in the call for participants, etc.)

These items are due by November 13, 2017.

Please submit your application online at https://www.xcdsystem.com/gsa. Your username and password are the same ones you use to log in to your GSA profile at https://thegsa.org/members/profile. Please note that you must be a current member of the GSA to submit a proposal. If you need your password reset, please contact Ms. Ursula Gray ([email protected]) at Johns Hopkins University Press. If technical questions or problems arise with the submission interface itself, please contact Elizabeth Fulton at [email protected].

At this point, the GSA Seminar Committee will provide suggestions and assistance for the final submission, which is due by December 13, 2017. The committee will then review seminar proposals and post a list of approved seminars and their topics on the GSA website by early January 2018.

 

The GSA Seminar Committee consists of:

Margaret Eleanor Menninger (Texas State University) | [email protected] (Chair)

Maria Mitchell (Franklin & Marshall College) | [email protected]

Faye Stewart (Georgia State University) | [email protected]