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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jan
23
Wed
The CALA (2019) Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology
Jan 23 – Jan 26 all-day

Following continuous requests for a Second Call, the CALA, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, to be held in Siem Reap Cambodia, January 23-26, 2019, is now extremely pleased to announce its Second Call.

Despite that the call has been given a deadline, it may close early, should a ceiling be placed on the submission numbers, as we have already received an abundance of submissions, over 400 in the first call. Submissions have until now been high, so please excuse delays in responding to any queries.

Full Title: Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 1

Short Title: CALA 1 (2019)

Location:
Siem Reap, Cambodia

Start Date:
23-Jan-2019 – 26-Jan-2019

Contact: Professor Susan Hagadorn

Meeting Email: [email protected]

Meeting URL: http://cala2019.puc.edu.kh

Meeting Description: 

The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, The CALA 1 (2019), in Cambodia, symbolizes a significant movement forward for Linguistic Anthropology, and in problematizing current perspectives and praxis in the field of Asian Linguistic Anthropology.

The CALA seeks to respond to concerns by those within respective fields, Linguistics, Anthropology, Sociolinguistics, Sociology, Cultural studies, and of course Linguistic Anthropology These concerns include the reduced (opportunity for) focus on Asian regions and work by Asian academics, largely contributable to issues of funding and expertise. These concerns also include that academics globally seek to both work on Asian regions and with Asian regions, but impeded by the absence of appropriate networks.

The CALA 1 thus aims to begin an era within which to opportune these academics to transfer knowledge, expertise, and valuable Linguistic and Anthropological Data across the world, through the interpersonal and inter-institutional networks the CALA conferences seek to build.

To ground these efforts, the Conference, at The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia at the centre, seeks to network a growing number of Institutions globally, to support this much needed project.

The theme for the inaugural CALA is ‘Revitalization and Representation‘, a theme pertinent to the current state of many Asian regions and countries vis-a-vis their global analogues.

Emerging from a complex weaving for received and produced colonializations, the languages and ethnicities within Asia have experienced strong curtailment and denigration, to the point where many have reached near extinction, while others have passed the point of extinction. Here, these languages and ethnicities require urgent revitalization through an anthropological set of approaches, in collaboration with academic, and non-academic, networks globally. Revitalization can be engendered effectively through the complex channels associated with and effected through the extensive and vast work developed in Representation. Cambodia seems to be at the centre of this need for focus, with many ethnicities and their languages currently on the brink of extinction, and with several now having less than ten living speakers.

Though The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia will host the Inaugural conference in 2019, in Siem Reap, the conference will be hosted by a different Institution globally, annually, while Paññāsāstra remains at the helm of the Conference, so to collaborate with all institutions wishing to involve themselves with and in the CALA network.

We thus welcome you to the CALA 1, in 2019, the Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, and to the CALA in general.

Important dates:

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Opens: Friday, October 13, 2017 at midnight (UTC Time)
Closes: Monday, February 9, 2018 at midnight (UTC Time)
________________________________

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE

By March 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
________________________________

REGISTRATION

Early Bird
Opens: February 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: May 14, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Normal Bird
Opens: May 15, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: August 25, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Late Bird
Opens: August 26, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: January 26, 2019, (Conference end)
________________________________

CONFERENCE DATES

Wednesday January 23rd, 2019
Thursday January 24th, 2019
Friday January 25th, 2019
Saturday January 26th, 2019
Subfields:

  • Anthropological linguistics
  • Applied sociolinguistics
  • Cognitive Anthropology and language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Post-structuralism and language
  • Semiotics and semiology
  • Language documentation
  • General sociolinguistics
  • Language socialization
  • Social psychology of language
  • Language revitalization
  • Ethnography of communication
  • Language, community, ethnicity
  • Language, dialect, sociolect, genre
  • Nonverbal semiotics
  • Multifunctionality
  • Language and embodiment
  • Documenting language
  • Ethnographical language work
  • Language, gender, sexuality
  • Language ideologies
  • Narrative and metanarrative
  • Language and spatial and temporal frames
  • Language minorities and majorities
  • Language in real and virtual spaces

Language contact and change

Jan
24
Thu
International Conference: Peoples and Cultures of the World  @ Palermo University
Jan 24 – Jan 26 all-day

Call for papers: Peoples and Cultures of the World 

International Conference
Palermo University, January 24-25, 2019
Building 19, Viale delle Scienze, Aula Seminari A and B

Deadline for submitting proposals: 30 November 2018

Abstract: 250 words (max)
Duration of each paper: 20 minutes
Official languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish

Registration to the Conference is free of cost. Travel, accommodation and food costs are to be covered by participants.

Scientific coordination:
Leonardo Mercatanti and Stefano Montes

Organizing committee:
Irene Majo Garigliano, Leonardo Mercatanti, Giovanni Messina, Stefano Montes, Alessandro Morello, Gaetano Sabato, Flavia Schiavo, Licia Taverna

Administration:
Department of Cultures and Societies, Palermo University
Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italy

Please send your paper and short biodata to:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Information:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Jan
26
Sat
New Marco Island Historical Museum Exhibit
Jan 26 all-day

Paradise Found: 6,000 Years of People on Marco Island

Marco Island Historical Museum prepares for major 2019-2021 exhibit

Key Marco Calusa artifacts together on Marco for first time since 1896 discovery  

Marco Island, FL — July 18, 2018 — The Marco Island Historical Society (MIHS) announces that the MIHS has achieved its 25-year quest to bring “home” on loan the world-famous Key Marco Cat and other rare Pre-Columbian Native American artifacts discovered on Marco Island, Florida in 1896.

Several of the most significant Key Marco artifacts will be brought together on Marco Island for the first time since their discovery by anthropologist Frank Hamilton Cushing more than 100 years ago. The exhibit will be at the Marco Island Historical Museum (MIHM) from January 2019 to April 2021.

A free, public grand opening event for the exhibit will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2019, during Museum hours. It will include a morning ribbon cutting to celebrate the official opening of the exhibit, live music, an afternoon program/performance on the music of the Calusa by composer and musician Kat Epple and Anthropology Band and family friendly activities.

The Key Marco Cat has been described as one of the finest pieces of Pre-Columbian Native American art ever discovered in North America. At only six inches tall and carved from buttonwood, the Key Marco Cat is a charismatic anthropomorphic feline statuette that has captured the public’s imagination for more than a century. Other important pieces in the exhibition include a ceremonial mask, alligator figurehead, painted human figure and sea turtle figurehead.

The MIHS is mounting the exhibit in collaboration with Collier County Museums, the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The loaned artifacts will be featured within one of the Museum’s permanent exhibits — Paradise Found: 6,000 Years of People on Marco Island.

“This exhibition is the culmination of a long-term vision to bring these incredibly important artifacts to Marco Island on loan in order to educate and inspire people of all ages about the fascinating history of our region,” says MIHS Curator of Collections Austin Bell. “It has taken years of planning and discussions with the lending institutions and the continuation of a public-private partnership that includes the Marco Island Historical Society, Collier County and the community.”

Jan
28
Mon
Call for Proposals: AES / ALLA / ABA Joint Spring 2019 Conference
Jan 28 all-day

Conference Theme: Ethnographic Futures
Hosts: AES / ALLA / ABA
Conference Dates: March 14 to 16, 2019
Location: Washington University in St. Louis
Website: https://americanethnologist.org/meetings/spring-conference/aes-2019
CfP deadline: January 28, 2019
Registration Prices: Students $40 / $45 (member / non-member); Professional $140 / $145 (member / non-member
Travel Diversity Grant deadline & information: January 28; [email protected]

 

Call for Paper Abstracts for Proposed Panels

View proposed panels seeking paper abstract submissions HERE.

Abstract Submissions for Panels, Individual Papers, and Roundtables

AES, ALLA, and ABA invite proposals for individual papers, organized paper panels, and roundtables for our joint Spring 2019 Conference. Word limit for abstracts: paper up to 250 words; Session/panel up to 500 words. Submit HERE.

When submitting your proposal, you will be asked to either (a) provide your own theme(s), or (b) select from the list of pre-determined themes provided by the program committee. These themes will be used during the review and scheduling processes to reduce content overlap. If your submission does not align within one of the themes, you may select “other” and provide your theme(s) as written responses.

Pre-determined Themes:
Theorizing the Future
Methodology: Innovations, Conundrums & Engagement
Violence, Trauma & Resistance
Citizenship & Belonging
Debt & Repayments
Queer & Other Intimate Imaginings
Sanctuary & Refuge
Migration, Mobility & Borders
The State, Surveillance & In/Exclusions
Race, Ethnicity & Class Formations
Gendered Spaces & Subversions
Embodiment & the Body
Emancipatory Politics & Solidarity
Urban Futures
Health, Healing, and Ethics
Environmental Justice
Labor & Work
Consumption & Desire
Others proposed by submitters

The submissions portal closes Monday, January 28, 2019 (3pm ET).

Feb
14
Thu
Household Water Insecurity Experiences – Research Coordination Network Reception
Feb 14 – Feb 17 all-day

NSF Funds Research Coordination Network for Household Water Insecurity

The National Science Foundation (Geography and Spatial Science Program) has funded the Household Water Insecurity Experiences (HWISE) – Research Coordination Network (RCN) to operate at the strategic intersection of social science discovery, policy, and practice. The project is under the direction of Principal Investigator Dr. Wendy Jepson (Department of Geography, Texas A&M University) and Co-PIs Dr. Justin Stoler (Department of Geography and Regional Studies, University of Miami), Dr. Amber Wutich (Department of Anthropology, Arizona State University), and Dr. Sera Young (Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University).

RCN Goals and Activities

The HWISE-RCN’s mission is to build a community of practice and collaboration that fosters key analytics and theoretical advances coupled with the development of research protocols and standardized assessments to document, benchmark, and understand the causes and outcomes of water insecurity at the household scale. Our objectives are to promote cutting edge research about the experiences and assessment of household water insecurity, and to create a network that supports scientific discovery and professional development. Our goals are to (1) integrate geospatial methodologies into existing HWISE research (2) evaluate how HWISE methods and concepts can be translated to household water insecurity experiences in high- and middle-income regions, and (3) establish and cultivate key pathways to translate HWISE discoveries to NSF research priority efforts.

HWISE Collaborations now include over 40 scholars from 24 U.S. and international institutions across the career spectrum and disciplines including social sciences, public health, water-sector professionals, policy makers, and development practitioners. Please visit our website to learn more about the project or how you can join as a member.

Upcoming Activities

The network will launch and host a reception at the American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual meeting in Washington, DC from February 14-17, 2019. This event will be an opportunity to learn more about the network activities and will highlight our HWISE Scale and Development project

Feb
15
Fri
2019 German Studies Association Call for Proposals
Feb 15 all-day

2019 German Studies Association Call for Proposals

GSA 2019 German Studies Association

GERMAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The German Studies Association (GSA) will hold its 43rd Annual Conference from 3 to 6 October 2019 at the Hilton Portland Downtown in Portland, Oregon (USA).

The Program Committee cordially invites proposals on any aspect of German, Austrian, or Swiss studies, including (but not limited to) history, Germanistik, film, art history, political science, anthropology, musicology, religious studies, sociology, and cultural studies.

Proposals for entire sessions, for interdisciplinary presentations, and for series of panels are strongly encouraged (though we discourage thematic series of more than four panels).  Individual paper proposals are also welcome. The call for seminar proposals has been distributed separately.

Please see the GSA website for information about the submission process for ‘traditional’ papers, sessions, and roundtables, which will open on 5 January 2019. The deadline for proposals is 15 February 2019.

Please note that all proposed presenters must be members of the German Studies Association. Information on membership is available on the GSA website (www.thegsa.org).

In order to avoid complications later, the Program Committee would like to reiterate two extremely important guidelines here (the full list of guidelines is available on the GSA website):

 

  1. No individual at the GSA conference may give more than one paper or appear on the program in more than two separate roles. (Participating in a seminar counts as delivering a paper.)
  2. If a paper proposal requires high quality sound equipment, that justification must be made in detail at the time of submission.

 

For more information, visit the GSA website, where previous conference programs and a detailed list of submission guidelines may be found (www.thegsa.org), or contact members of the 2019 Program Committee:

https://www.thegsa.org/conference/program-committee-2019

25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

Mar
14
Thu
AES / ALLA / ABA Joint Spring 2019 Conference
Mar 14 – Mar 16 all-day

Conference Theme: Ethnographic Futures
Hosts: AES / ALLA / ABA
Conference Dates: March 14 to 16, 2019
Location: Washington University in St. Louis
Website: https://americanethnologist.org/meetings/spring-conference/aes-2019
CfP deadline: January 28, 2019
Registration Prices: Students $40 / $45 (member / non-member); Professional $140 / $145 (member / non-member
Travel Diversity Grant deadline & information: January 28; [email protected]

 

The AES 2019 spring conference will be co-sponsored by Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists (ALLA) and Association of Black Anthropologists (ABA). It will be held at Washington University in St Louis (MO) from Thursday, March 14th to Saturday, March 16th.

Ethnographic Futures

We are not in normal times. At least according to some. For others, the perverse assaults against bodies, land, science, and justice have merely become more visible and contestable. At a minimum, people around the world and in the United States are experiencing uncertainty, violations, and anxieties. How are anthropologists strategically positioned to reflect on and theorize this uncertainty and ab-normalcy while bringing to the foreground local articulations of hope, emancipatory politics, and meaning-making? For our Spring 2019 meeting, we invite anthropologists and other scholars and activists to join the American Ethnological Society (AES), the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists (ALLA), and the Association for Black Anthropologists (ABA) in St. Louis to consider possible unfoldings of the future in specific locales, worlds, and lifeways. Five years after protests in Ferguson around racialized police brutality, Ethnographic Futures will convene in nearby St. Louis to explore how people with whom we study and collaborate imagine, create, participate, and refuse. This includes possibilities for mobilizing and challenging dominant structures but also the quotidian practices of caring, laboring, and celebrating. As some blur lines between the academy and activism, while others push back on disruptions of traditional geographic and disciplinary boundaries, we invite reflections on the future and the ethnographic. Both a method of knowing and a practice of representation (texts, photography, documentaries, teaching), ethnography is itself part of and a challenge to certain futures.

Questions? Contact [email protected]

Sign up to receive conference updates via email: https://goo.gl/forms/bPG6pr7Df0o4kJSm1

Mar
15
Fri
The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019
Mar 15 all-day

The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019

Bounded languages, Unbounded

The politics of identity remain central to the mediation of language change. Here, boundaries rise and fall, thus motivating the ephemeral nature of community. The Mediterranean region is one replete with histories and power struggles, clearly demarcating nation, community, and ethnicity. Identities, language ideologies, and the languages themselves, have sought boundedness, dynamics which have indeed sought change over eons, through demographic and geographic movements, through geopolitics, through technological innovation. In a current era of technological advancement, transnational fluidity, intellectual power, capitalism, and new sexualities, we question, once again, the boundedness of language and identity, and ways in which to unbound languages and ideologies. However, mroe than before, we now increasingly require anthropological toil, so to innovative ways to locate these ideologies and their fluid boundaries, actively. We now then need to unbound these languages, and their ideologies, so to arrive at progressive realizations, and to rectify, or at least see past, the segregations of old.

The theme for the COMELA 2019,

Bounded languages, Unbounded

encapsulates an ongoing struggle throughout Mediterranean regions. The continuous tension between demarcation, yet concurrent legitimization, of languages, language ideologies, and language identities, has now entered an era where new modes of interactivity require language communities to take on roles superordinate to the past, and where flexible citizenship now operates within, and not only across, language communities.

For more information about the CFP, please visit the website.

 

Abstract and poster proposal submission

Opens: August 13, 2018 at midnight (CET Time)
Closes: January 25, 2019 at midnight (CET Time)

CFP: Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies
Mar 15 all-day

Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies is a flightless, multi-site conference that invites interdisciplinary attention to confluences between environmental and religious perspectives and practices in the long Anglophone nineteenth century (1780-1900). The conference will be broadcast online from four participating sites:

• Armstrong Browning Library at Baylor University (Texas)
• Lancaster University (UK)
• University of Washington (Seattle)
• Georgetown University (Washington, D.C.)

This conference calls for attention both to earlier religious environmental consciousness and to the environmental impact of our scholarship today. According to TerraPass, air travel for an average international conference generates roughly 100 metric tons (mT) of carbon dioxide equivalents, the same greenhouse-gas impact as consuming 11,252 gallons of gasoline, burning 109,409 pounds of coal, or driving 245,098 miles in a passenger vehicle. In addition to avoiding air travel, we hope to lower barriers of cost and transportation, thereby enabling a more diverse and inclusive range of participation than is often possible at international conferences.

Rather than seeking to replace physical with digital networking, this conference will take a hybrid approach by linking several international sites. Events will be live-streamed on a shared conference website, where, after the conference dates, they will also be recorded for future access.

The Call for Papers is available on the Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies conference site: baylor.edu/library/ecologyreligion. I encourage you to visit the site and submit a proposal for a paper or panel session. I look forward to your submission and to our engagement with one another through this new way of conferencing.