Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Mar
16
Fri
2018 National Humanities Conference Call for Proposals is Now Available
Mar 16 all-day

We are pleased to announce that the Call for Proposals for the 2018 National Humanities Conference is now available! The conference, to be held November 8-11, 2018 in New Orleans, in conjunction with the city’s tricentennial celebration.

Click here for the Call for Proposals. We welcome proposals for sessions, individual lightning talks, and working groups.

The National Humanities Conference brings together the public humanities and academia to explore opportunities and challenges, learn about collaborations and best practices, and strengthen America’s humanities network.The National Humanities Conference is co-hosted by the National Humanities Alliance and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. To learn more about the conference, click here.

We encourage you to submit proposals and recruit others to do the same! Please contact Beatrice Gurwitz at [email protected] with any questions or for support in building sessions.

Registration is open for NHA Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day

Help us build on last year’s momentum and push for funding increases for the National Endowment for the Humanities and other federal funding streams.

Register today for the 2018 National Humanities Alliance Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day!

March 11-13, 2018

Washington Court Hotel and Capitol Hill

Washington, D.C.

Early registration ends January 12. Register now at a reduced rate.

Click here to learn more about the NHA Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day.

Click here to reserve a room in the conference hotel. Availability is limited.

American Friends of Marbach Dissertation Grants
Mar 16 all-day

The American Friends of Marbach (AFM) are able to award four dissertation grants of $4,000 each to PhD candidates from American universities doing research in the field of German Studies at the Deutsche Literaturarchiv (DLA) in Marbach. Two of these stipends, which are normally meant to be taken over the summer break, have been granted by the Max Kade Foundation in New York; one is named after their donors “The David Detjen Research Grant;” and the fourth is the recently established “AFM Dissertation Grant.” In addition, the American Friends of Marbach are able to offer an “AFM Travel Grant” in the amount of $2,000, also intended for PhD candidates at American universities doing research at the DLA in the field of German Studies.

All grantees benefit from the excellent services that the DLA provides to researchers. Upon arrival, each grantee is welcomed by a staff member of the DLA who assists in determining the shape and goals of the research visit, and who serves as contact person for the duration of the stay. Researchers can also participate in a weekly “Stipendiaten-Café,” where international stipend-holders and fellow humanists have the opportunity to network and present their work to one another. Depending on availability, the well-appointed Kollegienhaus on the grounds of the DLA offers an excellent option for lodging.

Please submit a 1-2 page project description which should include a brief statement about the relevance of the holdings at the DLA for the project, a current CV, and arrange for one letter of recommendation from the dissertation adviser to Prof. Johannes von Moltke (University of Michigan): [email protected] by March 16, 2018. The decision will be announced in mid-April.

For other Marbach fellowships see http://www.dla-marbach.de/service/stipendienprogramm

Mar
17
Sat
Call for Information about Dissertations in German Studies
Mar 17 all-day

Call for Information about Dissertations in German Studies

The German Studies Association is continuing its tradition of posting information in the spring newsletter about dissertations completed in any area of German (that means: Austrian, German, Swiss, German diasporic) Studies (any discipline or interdisciplinary). If you received your PhD in 2016 or 2017, you may be listed in the Spring 2018 newsletter (no repeats, however!). If you have supervised a dissertation that was completed in 2016 or 2017 that has not already been listed, please encourage the author to submit a description following the guidelines below.

Send an email to Johannes von Moltke ([email protected]) anytime before March 17, 2018.

Please type “GSA dissertation list” in the subject line.

Be sure to include (in this order, please):

  1. Name (Last, first)
  2. Title of Dissertation
  3. Institution and department in which it was defended
  4. Name of dissertation director(s)
  5. Month and Year of Defense (or degree if no defense)
  6. Abstract of the dissertation of 200 or fewer words in either English or German. (150 words is desired length, 200 words an absolute limit. Longer abstracts will be shortened)
Mar
22
Thu
American Ethnological Society (AES) and Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Joint Spring Conference: Resemblance
Mar 22 – Mar 24 all-day

In an era of “fake news” and “alt” political movements, what counts as meaning making? How can we understand epistemology in an era of madness? The issue of resemblance is as much a pressing social question as it is an academic preoccupation. The American Ethnological Society and the Society for Visual Anthropology explore the theme of resemblance at their 2018 joint spring conference. Welcoming anthropologists, artists, media makers, and community members to Philadelphia during March 22-24, the meeting will provide an opportunity to revisit and explore anew what we believe is knowable as anthropologists and the ways we may wish to rethink our priorities and approaches in our era of heightened violence, strife, surveillance, and policing.

Resemblance is at the very heart of anthropology, as its practitioners have sought to demonstrate the commonalities of all people. While resemblance relies upon recognition and likening, it is also a means of comparison to what one perceives and believes they already know. The conference organizers invite proposals for panels consisting of papers or multimodal presentations, as well as individual submissions that theoretically, methodologically, visually, or otherwise examine the conference theme. We welcome graduate students to present their work in its early stages and to network with more establish practitioners. The conference will feature exhibitions, speakers, films, performances, as well as a town hall discussion about how our field can wield greater influence in public struggles of resemblance.

Immigration Futures: Marking 20 Years of the National Metropolis Conference
Mar 22 – Mar 24 all-day

The National Metropolis Conference is an annual forum for researchers, policy makers, representatives from community and settlement organizations to get together to share and exchange knowledge and experience in the field of immigration and settlement.

The National Metropolis Conference will focus on future immigration trends and policies and the challenges and opportunities that they create for Canadian society. The conference will include plenary panels with distinguished speakers and workshop and roundtable sessions on a wide variety of topics related to immigration and diversity.

Register for the conference at https://www.metropolisconference.ca/en/registration.php.

Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness (SAC) Spring Conference: Altered States, Sound, Ritual and Healing Today, Both in Traditional Cultures and Non Traditional
Mar 22 – Mar 25 all-day

Healing is one function attributed to shamanic practice and is fundamental to many of the esoteric principals of ritual and spiritual healing beliefs that have been part of our world’s cultures. Sound weather chanting, sacred sounds, and instruments of varying types are also used to form the vessel of healing. Exploring the various uses and meaning of ritual, sound, and altered states invites a deeper understanding of why these elements are conflated into the healing arts of many cultures ancient and newly forming sub-cultures around the world.  The theme of the 2018 conference concerns the diverse ways in which these healing practices are used and being transformed by technology and modern world philosophy; and how these modalities of sound and ritual have significance in healing practices around the world today.

Mar
23
Fri
Indiana University Summer Repository Research Fellowship
Mar 23 all-day

Call for applications

The Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study is now accepting applications for its 2018 Summer Repository Research Fellowship. The application deadline for Summer 2018 is March 23. In partnership with repositories on the IU Bloomington campus and supported by the Office of the Vice Provost for Research, the program funds a short-term fellowship for a faculty member or community scholar to conduct in-depth research in the collections of one or more of our partner repositories. Applicants from Minority Serving Institutions, community colleges, and source communities are welcome. Preference will be given to applicants who are collaborating with Indiana University Bloomington faculty members.

This initiative is intended to support research in the rich collections of the IU Bloomington campus and to build partnerships between scholars at and beyond IUB. The fellowship provides funding for travel costs, accommodation, per diem, and a two-week stipend. Please note: This fellowship is intended to support research in IU Bloomington’s unique collections; the application should focus on materials that cannot be accessed elsewhere.

Summer 2018 partner repositories include the Archives of African American Music and Culture, the Archives of Traditional Music, the University Archives, the Black Film Center/Archive, the Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology, the Indiana Geological Survey, the IU Herbarium, the Kinsey Institute, the IU Libraries, the IU Paleontology Collection, the Jerome Hall Law Library, the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, the Lilly Library, the Sage Collection, and the Wylie House Museum. Applications are due by March 23, 2018. For application materials and additional information, please visit our website at http://ias.indiana.edu/.

Projects focusing on items that can be purchased, borrowed through interlibrary loan, or utilized effectively from a distance via digital surrogates are not within the scope of this program.

Mar
30
Fri
CFP: EPIC 2018
Mar 30 all-day

How is evidence created, used, and abused? The EPIC2018 theme is Evidence, conceptualized in the broadest sense. We’ll focus on methods both new and tried-and-true, the changing types of evidence that are now possible, and how to make a case with evidence in a challenging social environment.

The program committee invites proposals for Papers, Case Studies, PechaKucha, Film/Animation, and Gallery presentations that address evidence creation, use, and abuse. (Salons and Tutorials will be part of the EPIC2018 program, but organized by invitation.) We are also extending a special invitation to data and computer scientists, and ethnographer + data/computer scientist collaborators.

Most contributions should draw on theoretical advances in ethnographically informed social science research and aligned disciplines, coupled with applied best practices from professional fields. They should show new directions for creating knowledge and making change. We welcome contributions from any discipline, industry, or organization in the private, public, or nonprofit sectors that creates and applies ethnography.

Submit to EPIC2018!

  • Submission deadline—March 30
  • Acceptance notification—June 8

Invitation to Submit

Research methods are proliferating, yet the connection between evidence and decisions seems more tenuous than ever. EPIC2018 will explore the richness of methods, tools, and approaches in contemporary ethnographic practice; the changing types of evidence that are now possible; and how to make a case with evidence in a challenging social environment.

The Conference Committee is accepting submissions in these categories:
Papers • Case Studies • PechaKucha • Film/Animation • Gallery

We particularly encourage submissions at the emerging intersection of data science and ethnography. In addition to contributions from the many fields that regularly engage in ethnographic work, we invite data and computer scientists, as well as teams of ethnographers + data/computer scientists.

Mar
31
Sat
2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Mar 31 all-day

2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
October 17-20, 2018
Buffalo Niagara County Convention Center
Buffalo, New York, USA

Proposal submission deadline: March 31, 2017

 

No Illusions, No Exclusions

The meeting theme, “No Illusions, No Exclusions,” is inspired by its location in Buffalo, New York, “The City of No Illusions.”

Buffalo is proudly gutsy, realistic, highly vernacular and inclusive. The city openly welcomes recent refugees, who enhance the substantial diversity brought about by its remarkable industrial heritage and legacy of Native Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) First Nations. Buffalo’s post-industrial transformation brings with it challenges of gentrification, reconfiguration of the labor force and new symbolic strategies of self-representation.

Participants in the annual meeting are encouraged to explore how, at this divisive moment in American life, folklore confronts economic and social disruptions, builds community resilience and sustains pluralism amidst threats to E Pluribus Unum.

Participants are invited to present with colleagues from other disciplines and our community collaborators in recognition of folklore as an inherently inclusive, multidisciplinary field of study. As a discipline, folklore cannot stand in isolation from other fields as it shapes and is shaped by other disciplines while endeavoring to sustain itself as an autonomous discipline. In considering folklore as both academic discipline and public practice, participants are encouraged to examine how folklore engages community members as partners, valuing local knowledge and facilitating cultural self-determination.

The 129th Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen friendships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required.

You can find more information about the meeting, including instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events, beginning February 1, 2018, at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2018AM.

 

Contact information:

Lorraine Walsh Cashman
American Folklore Society
812-856-2422
www.afsnet.org
[email protected]

Apr
3
Tue
Call for Applications: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards
Apr 3 @ 11:59 pm

CLIR Invites Applications for 2018
Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards

Washington, DC, January 17, 2018 – The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is now accepting applications for 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards. The national competition, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supports digitizing collections of rare and unique content in collecting institutions.

Grants of between $50,000 and $250,000 for a single-institution project, or between $50,000 and $500,000 for a collaborative project, may be sought for projects beginning between January 1 and June 1, 2019.

The Digitizing Hidden Collections program coheres around six core values:

Scholarship: The program is designed to maximize its impact on the creation and dissemination of new knowledge.

Comprehensiveness: The program supports digitization projects that will provide thorough coverage of an important topic or topics of high interest to scholars, in ways that help those scholars understand digitized sources’ provenance and context.

Connectedness: The program supports projects that make digitized sources easily discoverable and accessible alongside related materials, including materials held by other collecting institutions as well as those held within the home institution.

Collaboration: The program promotes strategic partnerships rather than duplication of capacity and effort.

Sustainability: The program promotes best practices for ensuring the long-term availability and discoverability of digital files created through digitization.

Openness: The program ensures that digitized content will be made available to the public as easily and completely as possible, given ethical and legal constraints.

The application process has two phases. The initial proposal round is open, and proposals are due by 11:59 pm Eastern time on April 3, 2018. The final proposal round is by invitation. Only those applicants whose initial proposals have been approved by the program’s review panel will be able to submit a final proposal. Information for applicants, including a link to the online application form, is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

CLIR will hold a webinar for prospective applicants on Tuesday, January 30, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. Two Q&A webinars will be held on Thursday, February 15, and Wednesday, February 28, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. More information is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning.

Council on Library and Information Resources
1707 L Street, Ste 650
Washington, DC 20036, USA

Phone: 202.939.4750
www.clir.org