Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected]ananthro.org.

 

Feb
15
Wed
Second Generation African Immigrants: Identity and Transnationalism in the United States
Feb 15 all-day

Second Generation African Immigrants: Identity and Transnationalism in the United States

In the half a century since the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, close to 1.4 million black African immigrants have come to the United States (Pew Research Center 2015). In fact, Africans make up 36% of the overall foreign-born black population, up from 24% in 2000 and their numbers are growing steadily.  Nevertheless, in proportion to its growing size, the New African Diaspora in the United States, particularly the second generation constitutes one of the least studied groups.  Much of the existing research has focused on the second generation whose parents came from Latin America, Asia, and the Caribbean.

In seeking to redress this dearth of scholarship on this growing segment of the US population, the guest editors of this special issue of ABD seek articles on the lives and experiences of second generation African immigrants to provide insight into the intersection of immigrant cultures and mainstream expectations, as this group seeks to define and redefine being and becoming American. We are specifically interested in theoretically oriented and empirically based research that explores issues of racial and ethnic identity, transnationalism, economic, professional and social attainment.

We are especially interested in papers that address one or more of the following questions:

  1. What structural factors and inequalities, political dynamics, cultural and social processes affect the ethnic, racial and other identities that have developed among the African immigrant second generation?
  2. How do generation, gender, race, class and parents’ national-origin status affect the identity formation of second generation African immigrants?
  3. How do second generation African immigrants understand and navigate racial identities? In particular, how do they view themselves in relationship to African Americans and others who self-identify as black?
  4. Do they accept established categories of racial identity?  How do they interpret, negotiate, reconcile or contest their ethnic and racial identities?  And in what ways do this things create new dimensions of on-going debates about race in the US?
  5. What are the socio-economic achievements of the second generation, especially in relation to their parents and other social groups?
  6. What kind of transnational practices and engagements characterize the lives of the African immigrant second generation?  For instance, how does the new second generation of African immigrants build upon, expand or diverge from the transnational experiences of their parents?
  7. What notions of self and values do they transmit to their children?

Deadlines and Timeline

 Prospective authors should submit an Abstract (250-300 words in length) by February 15, 2017. Authors should send their abstract attached as a word document to the guest editors: Please be sure to include the following: full name, institutional affiliation, contact information (email and contact mailing address). Notices of acceptance of abstracts will be sent to authors by March 15h, 2017.

 Paper (6000-8000 words) must be submitted by August 30, 2017 for peer-review for special issue of the journal, African and Black Diaspora, and for consideration for presentation at the 60TH Annual Meeting of the African Studies Association to be held in Chicago, IL (November 15-19 2017).

 Revised Papers for Special Issue must be submitted by December 15, 2017

 Abstracts should be sent to the Guest Editors:

Kassahun Kebede, PhD                 

Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Department of Geography & Anthropology

Eastern Washington University

105 Isle Hall ▪ Cheney, WA 99004

[p] 509.359.2477

[email protected]

Fumilayo Showers, PhD

Assistant Professor of Sociology and International Studies

Central Connecticut State University

1615 Stanley Street

New Britain, CT 06050

[p] 860.832. 3144

[email protected]

Contact Email:

[email protected]

 

 

 

 

Mar
31
Fri
CfP: Annual Meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science
Mar 31 all-day

Achille Mbembe (2003) used the term ‘necropolitics’ to account for the existence of ‘death worlds’ within postcolonial geopolitical spaces.

While work in biopolitics has privileged the dynamics of ‘making live and letting die,’ Mbembe highlights the importance of both, extending lives and making deaths.

Rosi Braidotti (2013) follows Mbembe and includes posthuman subjects within the politics of death. Contemporary Anthropocene — as a limit of total extinction provoking an intense scholarship around the boundaries of life and worthy lives — is not exempt from problems associated with Western notions of individualism and humanism (Haraway 2016). In certain ways, Braidotti’s approach, along with other vitalist materialisms such as the work of Bennett (2010) or Barad (2007), allow for the generativity of Life to be seen as a material ongoing force that usurps such Western tendencies. While they transcend the idea of death as an exceptionally human experience that conditions political existence, at the same time they tend to reduce processes of death into Life, or ongoing generativity.

How can STS/ the anthropology of science and technology, research and mobilize the production of boundaries between life and death, between Life as organic and that which is Non-Life (Povinelli 2016)? How can we account for processes of differential dying in more-than-Western, more-than-human, more-than-bios, or even, more-than-earth worlds? This panel looks for contributions around the material semiotics of death, dead subjects, and killing/elimination that engage with the processes by which they are maintained, resignified, or disrupted.  Welcoming fabulation, empirical, theoretical, or speculative communications.

More information on the panel can be found here http://www.4sonline.org/meeting/open_panel_topics_34_66

The deadline for submission is March 1st. You may apply at https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/ssss/4s17/

 

Apr
20
Thu
4th International Conference of Ethnography and Education CFP
Apr 20 all-day

The 4th International Conference of Ethnography and Education organized in Spain is a forum of debate drawing on current contributions of ethnographic research in education. We encourage all participants to submit abstracts focusing on new knowledge and new approaches to the emerging challenges of education, diversity and inequality in the 21st century in a global world. Please, consider submitting to one of the three following strands:

1. Ethnographic inquiry before old and new research problems
2. Ethnographic research and the assessment of education policy
3. Debates and methodological advances in ethnography of education

The deadline for the submission of abstracts ends on the 20th of April 2017. The completed templates should be sent by email to [email protected] or using the link: http://us13.campaign-archive2.com/?u=65bbcb956634fa98123daa5fc&id=db4f065814

Important Dates:

April 20, 2017 Submission of abstracts ends
May 3, 2017 Review results announced 
May 3, 2017 Registration starts
May 15, 2017 Participants with papers and early bird ends
 June 10, 2017 Presentation times announced
July 10, 2017 Registration Deadline

Registration fees:

CIEYE 2017 conference fees: Registration by 15 May Registration from 16 May
Delegates 150 EUR 190 EUR
Students/Unemployed/Low GDP country delegates 70 EUR 130 EUR

 

May
20
Sat
Anthropologies of the United States of America: Views from Near and from Afar CFP
May 20 all-day

Anthropologies of the United States of America: Views from Near and from Afar
International Conference
University of Palermo, June 15 – 16, 2017

This conference is an interdisciplinary research project intended for scholars from various fields. The aim is to discuss a historically, anthropologically and politically central country: the United States. Is it possible to see the United States as a country to be examined from multiple points of view – both from near and from afar – with particular interest in the current “anthropological” culture, while also paying attention to history and making predictions about the future? Specialists and enthusiasts from various backgrounds are invited to respond from specific perspectives, in order to compare and contrast different interpretations of the “American galaxy”. To this end, both studies of a theoretical nature and case studies are encouraged. The view from near and from afar, obviously a reference to Lévi-Strauss, alludes to a modus operandi anthropologically based on comparing and contrasting different perspectives. Anthropologists are directly concerned here, because it was in the United States that the much-discussed anthropological Postmodernism recently emerged, and because it was also in the United States that the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, based on studies of Native Americans, was conceived. The reference to “anthropologies” should therefore be viewed literally (anthropologists specializing in the United States in largely ethnographic terms) and with a culturally wider meaning (linguists, comparatists, geographers, semiologists, historians, etc., who observe American culture from their respective epistemological perspectives). The reference to the interdisciplinary nature of the conference, aside from being a theoretical inclination shared by the organizers, is a happy necessity for those who study a multicultural country like the United States, with its difficult past of coexistence between colonizers and natives, as well as between the different cultures of which it is composed today.

We offer the following suggestions as possible topics of discussion, from a comparative perspective or otherwise:

  • Native and non-native cultures
  • Ancient/recent migratory phenomena
  • Conformism/individualism
  • Multiculturalism and identity
  • Religious radicalization and New Age movements
  • Processes of globalization and local agency
  • American anthropology/other anthropologies
  • American literature/other literatures
  • The linguistic relativity hypothesis today
  • Everyday cultures
  • Tradition and modernity
  • Processes of homogenization and diversification of knowledge
  • Spaces of imagination
  • Places and non-places
  • Ecologies of landscape
  • Wilderness
  • Languages of power and knowledge
  • Current political situation
  • Politics of inclusion/exclusion
  • Oral histories
  • Etc.

Keynote speaker:
Vincent Crapanzano, City University of New York

Scientific board:
Stefano Montes and Matteo Meschiari

Administrative organization:
Dipartimento Culture e Società
Università degli Studi di Palermo
Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italia

For information and to submit proposals:
Stefano Montes ([email protected].it)
Matteo Meschiari ([email protected])

Practical information:
Deadline for submitting proposals: 20 May 2017
Proposal summary and title: 250-300 words
Duration of presentations: 20 minutes
Conference languages: Italian, French and English
Conference participation is free of charge
Travel costs, accommodation expenses and meals are covered by participants or their institutions
Proceedings of the conference will be published

Jun
1
Thu
International Journal of Business Anthropology CFP
Jun 1 all-day

 The International Journal of Business Anthropology (IJBA), is a double-blinded peer reviewed journal focusing upon business anthropology supported by the College of Sociology and Anthropology, Sun Yat-Sen University, China, the Faculty of Social Science, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands, the Institute of Business Anthropology, Shantou University, which was originally published by the North American Business Press (NABP) and is currently published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing starting from Vol. 6 (1) biannually in June and December every year.

The journal seeks articles by anthropologically-oriented scholars and practitioners. Regionally- focused contributions are welcome, especially when their findings can be generalized. We encourage the dialogues between the findings or theories generated from the field of business anthropology and the theories of general anthropology. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, general business anthropology theories and methods, management, marketing, consumer behavior, product design and development, knowledge management and competitive intelligence, human resources management, international business, etc.

The objectives of IJBA are:

  • Generate an exchange of ideas between scholars, practitioners and industry specialists in the field of applied and business anthropology
  • Encourage bridge-building between the practitioner and the academic world
  • Provide a vehicle of communication for anthropologists working within the practitioner world
  • Provide a forum for work concerned with qualitative business analysis inspired by anthropological theory and methods

Call for Papers

We are always looking for good manuscripts! We encourage practitioners, students, community members, and faculty from all disciplines to submit articles. The Editors and one or more anonymous peer reviewers will review the manuscript prior to its acceptance for publication. In addition to research and academic articles, we feature case studies, commentaries and reviews. Please send manuscripts, news notes and correspondence to: Dr. Gang Chen, Executive Editor, via e-mail at [email protected], or [email protected].

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

The journal invites paper of 4000-12000 words, including text, notes, references and appendices. All papers will be fully peer reviewed. All manuscripts should include a brief abstract (150 words maximum) and follow the Chicago Manual of Style, available at http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/home.html.  Please also note the following:

  1. Files should be supplied in Word format. In the case of photographs/figures/tables that need to be placed in a separate section please include these in a separate file, ensuring that images are labelled with captions that are consistently positioned and formatted (see more details below). All in-text material must be included in the main files of the manuscript.
  2. All authors for the paper should be clearly listed, with affiliations, in the order in which they should be published.
  3. Use double quotation marks for all cases (including single words)except for quotes within quotes.
  4. Authors are asked to read the Copyright and Permissions Guidance on the Cambridge Scholars Publishing website at http://www.cambridgescholars.com/t/AuthorFormsGuidelines to ensure that all material from another source is correctly referenced, and permission to republish sought where necessary.
Sep
7
Thu
Call for Session Proposals: Twelfth International Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies
Sep 7 all-day

“Situations, Times, and Places in Hunter-Gatherer Research”

 12th International Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS XII) 23–27 July 2018

Convenor: Lye Tuck-Po, School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia

Organisation:INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR HUNTER GATHERER RESEARCH (ISHGR)

Hosted by: SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITI SAINS MALAYSIA

The Call for Sessions is now open!

Submission by online form only: https://goo.gl/forms/ghcDs1WqHeFOCACF2.

Closing date: 7 September 2017 (11:59 PM Kuala Lumpur time)

 CHAGS conferences generate intellectual exchange, advance knowledge of the lives and times of hunter-gatherers in the past, present, and future, and have made significant contributions to anthropological theory. CHAGS X (Liverpool, 2013) and CHAGS XI (Vienna, 2015) attracted unprecedented numbers of first-timers and students interested in hunter-gatherer societies and the dynamics and conditions of their lives, and offered the promise of new disciplinary crossways, concerns, and approaches. The objective of CHAGS XII is to push this momentum forward and to expand the social spaces of knowledge sharing and production. We aim to cultivate not just diversity in concept-building but good practices of working with and relating to hunter-gatherers.

As with previous conferences, the scope of CHAGS XII is broadly global and its perspective is towards the long-term. We welcome proposals for sessions that seek ways to go beyond geographical and disciplinary specialisms, and that promote new pathways of knowledge production. We invite participants to reflect on “situations, times, and places” whether integratively (as a springboard for general theoretical reflections on their interconnections) or separately (as discrete themes and topics), and to examine the intersections of time and place with fieldwork and theorising across the many concerns of hunter-gatherer research. This last will include the time-space compressions of the digital age, which are changing everyday experiences everywhere.

Sep
30
Sat
VISTAS: 39th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association CFP
Sep 30 all-day

VISTAS: 39th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association
Philadelphia, March 15-18, 2018
Keynote: Elizabeth Milroy (Drexel University)

In honor of the 100th anniversary of Philadelphia’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the NCSA committee invites proposals that explore the notion of the vista in the nineteenth century. From personal gardens to public parks, from the street level to the top of a skyscraper, or from the microscope to the panoramic photograph, the nineteenth century was a moment when the idea of the vista changed from a narrow sightline to a sweeping, expansive view. How did theorists alter our historical perspective, broadening our notion of the world through science or religion? In what ways did power systems affect urban vantage points? How did man-made vistas reflect socio-cultural ideals? How did domestic spaces or nightlife transform with the widespread use of gas or electric lighting? How does the conceptual vista operate metaphorically? Topics might include horticulture, landscapes and seascapes, new technology, photography, sightseeing, film and the theater, urban planning, visions and dreamscapes, shifting perceptions of the gaze, or literary or artistic descriptions or depictions of viewpoints. In contrast, papers may consider the absence of vistas, such as mental or physical confinement or elements that obfuscate a view.

Please send 250-word abstracts with one-page CVs to [email protected] by September 30th, 2017. Abstracts should include the author’s name, institutional affiliation, and paper title in the heading. We welcome individual proposals and panel proposals with four presenters and a moderator. Note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend if accepted. Presenters will be notified in November 2017. We encourage submissions from graduate students, and those whose proposals have been accepted may submit complete papers to apply for a travel grant to help cover transportation and lodging expenses. Scholars who reside outside of North America and whose proposals have been accepted may submit a full paper to be considered for the International Scholar Travel Grant (see the NCSA website for additional requirements: http://www.ncsaweb.net).

Nov
10
Fri
Migration in a Changing Global World @ Ruppin Academic Center,
Nov 10 all-day

Ruppin Academic Center, Israel
May 14–16, 2018
Call for Papers

Over recent decades a growing number of countries across the globe have encountered major challenges related to migration, emigration and integration of immigrants. The 2018 Ruppin International Conference will focus on causes and consequences of migration in a changing global world. Issues related to the rising flows of various types of immigrants, including labor migrants, asylum seekers and refugees will be addressed and discussed by researchers, policy makers, practitioners and social scientists from a variety of disciplines across the world. Similar to other countries, the State of Israel, which marks its 70th anniversary this year, faces significant challenges as related to integration of the various types of immigrants in society. The Israeli immigration experience will be discussed and evaluated within a comparative framework and in relations to the immigration experience of other countries whether immigrant societies or nation-states. The Ruppin International Conference on Immigration and Social Integration will focus on migration issues both at the global and local levels.

The Institute for Immigration and Social Integration at Ruppin Academic Center in cooperation with the Association for Canadian Studies (ACS) and the International Metropolis Project invites proposals for papers on a broad range of themes related to migration and integration on the following broadly defined topics:

● Immigration and globalization
● Immigrants integration in nation states
● Immigration and social policy
● Immigrants in the labor market of the host society
● Immigrants in the economic arena
● Refugees and asylum seekers
● Immigrants and Remittances
● Life stories of immigrants
● Social and educational aspects of immigration and integration
● Cultural aspects of immigration and integration (language, identity)
● Social-psychological aspects of immigration
● Attitudes and public views toward immigrants
● Immigrants in the city
● Immigration and the third sector/NGOs
● Health and well-being of immigrants
● Immigrant communities
● Service development for migrants
● Criminalization of migration

Papers on related topics but not included in the list will also be also considered.
We welcome proposals from academics, field experts, and policy makers.

Submission procedure:

Abstracts should be no more than 250 words long, for a paper of 20 minutes duration, and include the paper title, author name and title, institutional affiliation, and abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the organizers to the following e-mail address:
[email protected] by November 10, 2017.

The abstracts will be evaluated by an international academic committee chaired by Prof. Moshe Semyonov.

Answers Acceptance decisions and detailed information about registration, accommodations and travel arrangements will be sent back by December 10, 2017.

Upon acceptance of the paper, we will require a brief biographical note (approximately 60 words).

The conference will start on May 14th 2018 with professional study tours and a reception event.

The Institute for Immigration & Social Integration
Ruppin Academic Center
Prof. Moshe Semyonov, Conference Chair
Dr. Karin Amit, Conference Academic Coordinator
Ms. Nivi Dayan, Head of the Institute for Immigration & Social Integration

Jan
31
Wed
CFP: The Human Image in a Changing World @ F1963 & Kiswire Center
Jan 31 all-day

Co-organized by:

Ministry of Education, Republic of Korea (MOE)
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF)
Korean National Commission for UNESCO
Busan Metropolitan City

The theme for the 5th World Humanities Forum is “The Human Image in a Changing World.” The very purpose of humanities research is to study humans, but the image of humans however, has gone through on-going changes not only throughout different time periods but also according to the various local situations. Therefore it is important that we primarily capture human images and then document the characteristics of the human images from past to present in various academic and ordinary lives.

The theme of “The Human Image in a Changing World” seeks to examine the imbrications of human images across time and space, in order to redefine the ways in which humanities have been envisioned, particularly to visualize the various ways in which humanities engage with the cultural processes in the past, present, and future. Literature, visual arts, and new media have always taken the leading and guiding role in representing the human image as imagined and understood by the public. Historians have frequently been at the forefront of analyzing the dynamics of differences in human images in the continuum of time. Philosophers have generated profound yet varying discourses on how human images have been thought differently in terms of a philosophical relationship with nature, gender, and bodies. The emergence of the robotic industry and artificial intelligence demands investigation in order to recognize the human image, especially in the 21st century. Above all, it is crucial to discover human images as they are, and reflect them thoughtfully from various insights.

All humanities research, in its essence, explores human images that have evolved over time. It is the fundamental premise of our humanities research to understand the changing human images of today. We hope to explore and share distinctive human images, and hence develop new directions of humanities research for future generations.

Additional Roles

Participants applying are welcome to take on additional roles as moderator and commentator during the forum. Please check the boxes if you are able to moderate a session or be a commentator for other presentations.

Moderator

The moderator has the important role of overseeing the session. For a successful session, the moderator will be responsible for the following: 1) Give a short introduction of the speakers, 2) manage the time for each presentation and, 3) briefly summarize each presentation and facilitate the discussion.

Commentator

Presenters participating in the WHF are welcome to be commentators in other sessions. Around 2~3 commentators will be present at each session and give their opinion at the end of the presentation to begin the discussions.

Proposal Deadline

January 31, 2018

Funding

The World Humanities Forum will provide full support for flight and accommodation for the period of the Forum to all authors invited to present at the Forum.

May
31
Thu
Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture 2018
May 31 all-day

International Call for Nominations: Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture 2018

The Parkes Foundation invites nominations for the 2018 Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture on human/biosocial sciences

The lecture is awarded annually in Geoffrey Harrison’s honour to persons who have made a substantial and sustained contribution to the study of the human biology of living populations and especially biosocial sciences.

Nominations and self-nominations are welcome and must be accompanied by a CV of no more than two A4 pages (set in Arial font size 12). Please submit nominations via email to Mrs Caroline Edgley ([email protected]).

The closing date for nominations is Thursday 31st May 2018 and the lecture will take place on Friday 9th November 2018 followed by a drinks reception at the Natural History Museum in Oxford. The Parkes Foundation will contribute to travel and accommodation of the speaker.