Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Apr
30
Sun
Robert W. Sussman Award for Scientific Contributions to Anthropology
Apr 30 all-day

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Section H is proud to announce the inaugural Robert W. Sussman Award for Scientific Contributions to Anthropology. As you all know Bob Sussman embodies the science and spirit of Anthropology. From fieldwork on lemurs to human biology to deconstructing the evils of race, his legacy of mentorship, caring, and dissemination of knowledge will be with us forever.

This award recognizes meritorious scientific contributions to the field of anthropology by mid-career anthropologists. AAAS Section H members are encouraged to nominate candidates they feel exemplify the ideals of this award. Nominees do not have to be members of AAAS (though nominators do). Criteria and procedures are described in the attached document.

Nominations and questions should be sent to Section H Secretary Dr. Karen Strier at [email protected]. Deadline for nominations is APRIL 30, 2017.

Jun
2
Fri
Call for Nominations: Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecture 2017
Jun 2 all-day

The Parkes Foundation is pleased to announce the inaugural Geoffrey Harrison prize lecture on human/biosocial sciences.

The Prize Lecture is to be awarded annually in Geoffrey Harrison’s honor to persons who have made a substantial and sustained contribution to the study of human biology and especially biosocial sciences.

Nominations and self-nominations are welcome and must be accompanied by a CV of no more than two A4 pages (set in Arial font size 12). Please submit nominations via email to Dr Alex Alvergne ([email protected]) and Dr Simon Underdown ([email protected]).

The closing date for nominations is Friday 2nd June 2017. The lecture will take place on Friday 3rd November 2017 followed by a drinks reception at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History. The Parkes Foundation will contribute to travel and accommodation of the Geoffrey Harrison Prize Lecturer.

Oct
10
Tue
Public Service Award
Oct 10 all-day

Honoring Service in promoting Public Understanding of Science and Engineering

THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD HAS EXTENDED THE DEADLINE FOR NOMINATIONS FOR ITS 2018 HONORARY AWARDS UNTIL OCTOBER 10, 2017.

The National Science Board is pleased to accept nominations for the Public Service Award, which honors individuals and groups that have made substantial contributions to increasing public understanding of science and engineering in the United States. These contributions may be in a wide variety of areas that have the potential of contributing to public understanding of and appreciation for science and engineering—including mass media, education and/or training programs, and entertainment.

ELIGIBILITY AND SELECTION CRITERIA

Candidates for the NSB Public Service Award should have demonstrated outstanding leadership and accomplishment in meeting the following selection criteria:

  • Increased the public’s understanding of the processes of science and engineering through scientific discovery, innovation, and its communication to the public.
  • Encouraged others to help raise the public understanding of science and technology.
  • Promoted the engagement of scientists and engineers in public outreach and scientific literacy.
  • Contributed to the development of broad science and engineering policy and its support.
  • Influenced and encouraged the next generation of scientists and engineers.
  • Achieved broad recognition outside of the candidate’s area of specialization.
  • Fostered awareness of science and technology among broad segments of the population.

Please note that Members of the US Government are not eligible for this award.

NOMINATION GUIDELINES

Nominations for an individual must include:

  1. A current curriculum vita without publications (no more than 3 pages).
  2. A narrative statement (no more than 5 pages) addressing the following:
    1. the candidate’s public service activities in science and engineering, and
    2. the candidate’s contributions to public understanding of science and engineering, as they relate to the selection criteria.
  3. Contact information of candidate and nominator (mailing address, email address, phone number).

Nominations for a group must include:

  1. A narrative statement (no more than 5 pages) addressing the following:
    1. the group’s activities, and how it accomplishes the selection criteria for the award,
    2. length of years of the program,
    3. number and type of individuals served by the group’s activities; and
    4. data on the success of the program (if available).
  2. Contact information of candidate and nominator (mailing address, email address, phone number).

Reference letters are optional, and up to 3 letters (no more than to 2 pages each) may be submitted on letterhead as a PDF file.

SUBMIT A NOMINATION

Please submit nominations by email to: [email protected]

INQUIRIES

For questions concerning the award, please contact Kathy Jacquart at [email protected], 703-292-5118.

Vannevar Bush Award
Oct 10 all-day

Honoring Lifelong Leadership in Science and Technology and Contributions to the Nation through Public Service

THE NATIONAL SCIENCE BOARD HAS EXTENDED THE DEADLINE FOR NOMINATIONS FOR ITS 2018 HONORARY AWARDS UNTIL OCTOBER 10, 2017.

Vannevar Bush Award

The National Science Board is pleased to accept nominations for the Vannevar Bush Award. The Vannevar Bush Award honors truly exceptional lifelong leaders in science and technology who have made substantial contributions to the welfare of the Nation through public service activities in science, technology, and public policy. The award was established in 1980 in the memory of Vannevar Bush, who served as a science advisor to President Franklin Roosevelt during World War II, helped to establish Federal funding for science and engineering as a national priority during peacetime, and was behind the creation of the National Science Foundation.

ELIGIBILITY AND SELECTION CRITERIA

Candidates for the Vannevar Bush Award should have demonstrated outstanding leadership and accomplishment in meeting at least two of the following selection criteria:

  • Candidates must be US citizens.
  • Distinguished himself/herself through public service activities in science and technology.
  • Pioneered the exploration, charting, and settlement of new frontiers in science, technology, education, and public service.
  • Demonstrated leadership and creativity that have inspired others to distinguished careers in science and technology.
  • Contributed to the welfare of the Nation and mankind through activities in science and technology.
  • Demonstrated leadership and creativity that has helped mold the history of advancements in the Nation’s science, technology, and education.

NOMINATION GUIDELINES

Nominations must include:

  1. A current curriculum vita without publications (no more than 5 pages).
  2. A narrative statement (no more than 8 pages) addressing the candidate’s activities and contributions related to the selection criteria.
  3. A proposed award citation addressing the candidate’s activities in and contributions to national public service activities in science, technology, and public policy.
  4. Contact information for award candidate and nominator (mailing address, email address, and phone number).
  5. Two reference letters (no more than 2 pages each) from individuals familiar with the candidate’s accomplishments, and not affiliated with the candidate’s home institution. Letters should be submitted by email to [email protected] on letterhead as a PDF file.

SUBMIT A NOMINATION

Please Submit Nominations by email to [email protected]

INQUIRIES

For questions concerning the award, please contact Kathy Jacquart at [email protected], 703-292-5118

Oct
15
Sun
Call for Film Projects for AAA Film Pitch Workshop
Oct 15 all-day

CALL FOR FILM PROJECTS for AAA FILM PITCH WORKSHOP

 

Are you currently working on a film? Are you interested in getting feedback?


Are you interested in ethnographic film production but not yet ready to share a project in progress?

Due to the enormous success of the 2016 Pitch Session, we are once again convening a FILM PITCH Workshop at the 2017 AAAs.  Please join us for the Second Annual Society for Visual Anthropology FILM PITCH workshop, December 1, 1-5 PM.

A PITCH SESSION FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC FILMMAKERS: DEVELOPING YOUR STORY, INTEGRATING YOUR RESEARCH, FINDING FUNDING AND DISTRIBUTION

This workshop uses the pitch format of documentary film festivals in which filmmakers pitch their work-in-progress to a jury of funders, distributors and award winning filmmakers. For each film presented, the jury will provide feedback including strategies for visualizing anthropological content and suggestions for developing your narrative and structure. Other discussion topics include conceptualizing your audience, and opportunities and strategies for funding and distribution.

Pre- Selected filmmakers will give a 10 minute presentation of their project, that includes a description of the story, themes, research, visual style, plans for completion and a short video sample. Our workshop format is intended to encourage lively discussion between jurors, other workshop participants and the presenting filmmakers. Discussion will address both the effectiveness of the pitch and the substance of the film project. Jury and audience awards.

The goals of the workshop are:

  1. To model how to present a film project to potential collaborators, funders & distributors.
  2. To provide concrete strategies for turning research into visually compelling stories.
  3. To direct participants to funding and distribution opportunities.

Pitch jurors TO BE ANNOUNCED.

 

Two ways to participate in this workshop

PITCH YOUR PROJECT: Whether your project is in development, production, or in rough cut stage, this is an opportunity to get feedback on your work-in-progress from a jury with expertise in anthropological filmmaking, funding and distribution. Seven filmmakers (or filmmaking teams) will be selected to pitch projects. Those interested in presenting their film project should send a brief Pitch Proposal (see below) to Alice Apley ([email protected]) by October 15, 2017. The organizers will select a mix of experienced to first-time filmmakers.

NONPITCHING WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS: As a workshop participant, you can observe the pitches, join the discussion about the projects in progress, learn from the pitches, get ideas, and plan for a future visual project.

 

Pitch Proposal

If you are interested in pitching, send a one-page description of your project and a video sample. It should include:

  • Short synopsis describing the significance of the project, brief discussion of the issues, themes and story you will explore, and the visual style of the film (e.g. observational, experimental documentary etc).
  • Your bio, including your unique qualifications for completing this project successfully, such as knowledge, skills, access or history of involvement with the characters and/or subject matter.
  • Please also include a short status report describing where you are in the research, development and/or production process, what work has been completed and a brief timeline.
  • Production-related photo (optional).

Also send a trailer, teaser, or clips via a single streamable link of film footage or visuals (still or moving). (7 minutes maximum)

For questions, email Alice Apley, [email protected] or Sarah Elder, [email protected]

May
1
Tue
Call for Proposals: African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshops
May 1 all-day
CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO ORGANIZE A WORKSHOP

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organize a workshop to take place in 2019. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular questions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, or representational or institutional forms from diverse methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that bring into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energize conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organizations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organizations, NGOs or others appropriate to the topic.

Abstracts for previously funded ACIP Workshops are available here.

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2019.
  •  a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  • a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  •  a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organizers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape for basic financial administration and are responsible for complying with CHR policies. Workshop organizers should submit a letter from the host institution, centre, programme, or department confirming that appropriate administrative and institutional support will be available.

We ask Workshop organizers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organizers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organizations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches or specializations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply:

Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  •  abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement defining the proposed Workshop theme and focus, its significance, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organizing the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organizer)
  • an institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop. Please describe available administrative and logistical support in this letter and/or your work plan
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organization, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

Conceptualization: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross- institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed Workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

Workshop organizer(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organizing the Workshop, including previous administration/organization and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

Applicants who organize an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research.

After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Tuesday 1 May 2018. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

 

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2019 Workshop Proposal” to [email protected]

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund
http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html
 https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

May
20
Mon
One-Day Workshop:  The Social Contract in an Era of (Post-)Neoliberalism and Populism
May 20 all-day

One-Day Workshop:  The Social Contract in an Era of (Post-)Neoliberalism and Populism

21st of June 2019, Department of Anthropology, UCL

Keynote speaker: Dr Sian Lazar (University of Cambridge)

Organisers: Miranda Sheild Johansson (UCL), Gwen Burnyeat (UCL)

We invite papers that contemplate the social contract through themes such as political change, the public good, bureaucracy, good governance, public policy, crime, social movements, state-society negotiations and fiscal relations, among others. We are open to exploratory papers in early stages of linking existing ethnographic data and analysis to a discussion of the social contract. This is an excellent opportunity for PhD and early career researchers to meet each other and receive feedback from our discussants and keynote speaker, and we anticipate that the workshop will result in a special issue proposal to a political anthropology journal.

The workshop will take place on Friday 21st of June and consist of three panels. Dr Sian Lazar will give a keynote at the end of the day. To participate please submit a title, abstract (max 250 words) and short bio or CV to Miranda [email protected] and Gwen [email protected] by Mon the 20th of May. We will inform all applicants of the outcome of their submissions by Friday the 24th of May. Lunch, tea/coffee will be provided and there is some funding for travel.

 Feel free to contact either of us with any questions ˗ Miranda  [email protected] and Gwen [email protected]

 While 20th century contractarians, e.g. John Rawls, agree that state-society relations are not the result of actual contracts, but rather conquest, usurpation or gradual shifts in institutions that do not require a conscious opt-in, the social contract as a metaphor, or a set of mutual and varied expectations remains a powerful way for people, governments and social scientists to conceptualise state-society relations and assess political legitimacy. From notions of reciprocity (a citizen perceiving paying tax as a productive exchange with the state, Bjӧrklund Larsen 2018), and rejections of ‘the public’ under neoliberalism (citizens that prefer autonomy to state protection, Abelin 2012), to culture clashes brought on by competing logics of bureaucracy and everyday life (Mathur 2014), and contradictory affects and expectations towards states in conflict regions (Ramírez 2011), social contract theory is ever present in anthropological analysis. Today, in the context of global political transformations toward post-neoliberal and populist models, the concept has gained further traction. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together recent ethnographic research on state-society engagements to analyse the utility and meaning of the social contract today, both as an everyday emic category employed by research participants, and as a political philosophy category within anthropology.