Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected]ananthro.org.

 

Jun
1
Thu
Call for Participants: PhD Workshop
Jun 1 all-day

For the first time, the International Metropolis Conference in collaboration with the City of The Hague and the Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies (IMES) at the University of Amsterdam will offer a special program for PhD students. The program will start on Sunday evening, September 17, 2017 and will adjourn just before the opening of the Conference on Monday afternoon, September 18. The aim is to bring PhD students together to support the development of their international networks and to offer them a platform to discuss, directly with policy officials and civil society organizations, the value of their research for policy. There will be space for 25 students who will be selected on a first come, first served basis, subject to them meeting criteria detailed on the website (see link below).

Those who are accepted will be offered dinner on Sunday evening, lunch on Monday, a waiver for the registration fee for the International Metropolis Conference (September 18-22, 2017), and accommodation free of charge from Sunday September 17 until Friday September 22.

Students who wish to sign up should send an email with information about i) their affiliation, ii) the title and topic of their PhD project, iii) details about their policy related activities, iv) a CV, and v) two letters of recommendation from their supervisors to [email protected].

Please follow the link below to apply for this exciting opportunity: https://metropolisthehague.org/programme/phd.php

Apr
3
Tue
Call for Applications: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards
Apr 3 @ 11:59 pm

CLIR Invites Applications for 2018
Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards

Washington, DC, January 17, 2018 – The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is now accepting applications for 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards. The national competition, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supports digitizing collections of rare and unique content in collecting institutions.

Grants of between $50,000 and $250,000 for a single-institution project, or between $50,000 and $500,000 for a collaborative project, may be sought for projects beginning between January 1 and June 1, 2019.

The Digitizing Hidden Collections program coheres around six core values:

Scholarship: The program is designed to maximize its impact on the creation and dissemination of new knowledge.

Comprehensiveness: The program supports digitization projects that will provide thorough coverage of an important topic or topics of high interest to scholars, in ways that help those scholars understand digitized sources’ provenance and context.

Connectedness: The program supports projects that make digitized sources easily discoverable and accessible alongside related materials, including materials held by other collecting institutions as well as those held within the home institution.

Collaboration: The program promotes strategic partnerships rather than duplication of capacity and effort.

Sustainability: The program promotes best practices for ensuring the long-term availability and discoverability of digital files created through digitization.

Openness: The program ensures that digitized content will be made available to the public as easily and completely as possible, given ethical and legal constraints.

The application process has two phases. The initial proposal round is open, and proposals are due by 11:59 pm Eastern time on April 3, 2018. The final proposal round is by invitation. Only those applicants whose initial proposals have been approved by the program’s review panel will be able to submit a final proposal. Information for applicants, including a link to the online application form, is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

CLIR will hold a webinar for prospective applicants on Tuesday, January 30, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. Two Q&A webinars will be held on Thursday, February 15, and Wednesday, February 28, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. More information is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning.

Council on Library and Information Resources
1707 L Street, Ste 650
Washington, DC 20036, USA

Phone: 202.939.4750
www.clir.org

Jun
15
Fri
Graduate Methods Training Workshop: Focus on Russia
Jun 15 all-day

Friday, September 14—Saturday, September 15, 2018 at Indiana University-Bloomington

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Graduate Methods Training Workshop: Focus on Russia

With funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Russian Studies Workshop at Indiana University will host a two-day methods training workshop for U.S.-based pre-dissertation PhD students in the social sciences with a focus on Russia. The workshop is September 14-15, 2018 in Bloomington, Indiana.

Carrying out research in Russia, be it quantitative or qualitative, has particular challenges—navigating the complex archival and library systems, conducting personal interviews, collecting survey data, and keeping data secure—that can make it diffi- cult for graduate students to make efficient and effective use of their time while in country. The “Graduate Methods Training Workshop: Focus on Russia” at IU this September 14-15, 2018 will enable pre-dissertation PhD students (students who have not yet conducted their dissertation research) in the social sciences to engage in training and dialogue with experts from IU and elsewhere with a focus on particular challenges of research in Russia. We define social sciences broadly, and include anthropology, communications/media studies, economics, geography, history, law, political science, religious studies, sociol- ogy, STS, and others.

The two-day workshop will include opportunities to present your own proposed research in a Lightning Round session; con- duct one-on-one consultations with faculty experts; and choose from 5-6 workshops, which will cover: Qualitative Methods, including interviews; Survey Methods; Navigating Russia’s Library System and Archives from the U.S. and in Russia; Datasets and Digital Methods; and Media and Discourse Analysis.

The larger goals of the workshop are to build a community of pre-dissertation PhD students in the social sciences studying Russia, to promote networking and professionalization opportunities for emerging Russian Studies scholars with prominent faculty in the social sciences, and to expose emerging scholars to innovative methodological approaches in the social scienc- es, for studying Russia in particular.

To this end, we seek applications from PhD students in the United States whose work is in the social sciences (including history) and who are at the pre-dissertation research stage. Successful applicants will receive paid domestic (U.S.) travel, lodging, and meals/per diem for the length of the workshop.

Application requirements to be sent to [email protected]:

  • 2-3 page letter of interest, including description of proposed/preliminary dissertation research topic, proposed research methods, and expected utility of the workshop to your project;
  • CV;
  • Letter of recommendation from PhD/dissertation advisor, sent directly to [email protected] Please make sure you receive confirmation of receip*

Deadline for applications: June 15, 2018. Decisions will be announced by July 15.

*Applicants from Indiana University do not need to submit a letter of recommendation.

Sep
30
Sun
2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop
Sep 30 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop

Humanities Without Walls (HWW) is a consortium of humanities centers and institutes at 15 major research universities throughout the Midwest and beyond. Based at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), the HWW consortium is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In summer 2019, HWW is holding its second national, in-residence summer workshop for doctoral students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system. Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF)—a leading public humanities organization—designs and runs the summer workshop in consultation with HWW. Through a series of workshops, talks, and field trips, participants learn how to leverage their skills and training towards careers in the private sector, the non-profit world, arts administration, public media and many other fields.

We invite applications from doctoral students pursuing degree in the humanities and humanistic social sciences to participate in this three-week, in-residence summer workshop. This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be made to HWW by each university. To be considered, interested doctoral students must submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018.

About the Workshop: Launched in 2015 as an initiative of the HWW consortium, the workshop welcomes thirty participants each summer from higher education institutions across the United States. HWW Summer Workshop Fellows work in a variety of academic disciplines. They are scholars and practitioners who bring experience in community building, museum curation, filmmaking, radio programming, social media, project management, research, writing, and teaching. They are invested in issues of social justice and seek ways to bring humanistic values, insights, and skills to the public and private sectors.

In the spirit of practice-oriented learning, HWW and CHF partner with entities such as IDEO, a design and consulting firm, to lead students in real-world problem-solving exercises around important contemporary issues. Recognizing that each fellow’s skillset has been primarily oriented toward an academic track, the workshop includes sessions on values-based career planning, resume and cover letter construction, networking, and social media strategies from experts in career development.

Graduates from the workshop will emerge with a network of contacts in a range of professional realms; a significantly broadened sense of the career possibilities that await humanities PhDs; a cohort of HWW Summer Workshop Fellows (and friends!) from whom they may draw support and advice; and a set of resources aimed at helping them advance into the various realms considered under the broad rubric of “the public humanities.”

Where: Chicago, Illinois. Most weekday workshop events will take place at the Genevieve and Wayne Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church, 126 E. Chestnut St (at N. Michigan Ave.). The workshop also includes site visit to organizations around the city.

This is an in-residence workshop. As such, all participants, regardless of regular place of domicile, will be housed in private apartments. The costs of lodging are included in the fellowship. Staying in the provided housing is required as a condition of acceptance this fellowship. Details about lodging will be provided to those selected for the workshop.

When: Summer 2019—July 15th through August 2nd. Workshop sessions take place from approximately 9am to 5pm, Monday through Friday, for three weeks. Fellows are required to attend all workshop events and are strongly discouraged from traveling during the workshop. While there are no events scheduled during weekends, the CHF will circulate a list of interesting and exciting activities happening around Chicago that students are welcome to explore on their own.

Eligibility: All applicants must be enrolled in a doctoral degree program in a humanities or humanistic social science discipline at a PhD-granting institution within the United States. Applicants may be at any stage of their doctoral work, but they cannot have already received the doctoral degree at the time the workshop takes place. Ideally, applicants will have completed some coursework towards their doctoral degree, and they may have been advanced to candidacy but are not yet finishing their dissertations. International students are eligible to apply, but are responsible for confirming their registration and eligibility status at their home universities; HWW is not responsible for issuing visa paperwork.

Fellowship Prize: Each fellow will receive a $5,000 prize intended to cover travel to and from the summer workshop, most meals, and all incidentals. Fellows will be expected to arrange and pay for their own travel using the funds from this prize. The Chicago Humanities Festival will be arranging housing for all fellows in Chicago near the Gratz Center. All fellows are expected to attend the entire workshop for the entire three weeks and to stay in the provided housing.

Application Requirements: Interested doctoral students in the humanities should submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Combine and submit all application materials as a single PDF file.

The application file should contain:

  • A completed application cover sheet.
  • A narrative (1,000 words maximum) explaining the applicant’s intended career trajectory and addressing the following questions:
    • What is your experience with the “public humanities”?
    • Why are you interested in attending the workshop?
    • What kinds of knowledge are you seeking from the workshop?
    • What do you hope to achieve as a result of attending the workshop?
    • How do you envision sharing what you learn at the workshop with your department, campus, and beyond?
  • CV (two pages maximum),
  • Two letters of recommendation. One letter should be from the applicant’s primary adviser/dissertation chair; both should emphasize the applicant’s fit for this workshop.

Application Procedures: This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be subnitted to HWW from any given university.

Interested students must submit the application materials listed above to their universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Please do not submit your applications directly to HWW.

Humanities Center Directors, Graduate College Deans, or equivalents should submit the application for their nominee by 5:00 pm CDT on November 2nd, 2018. Applications should be submitted to [email protected] as a single PDF file attached to an email with the subject line “2019 Predoc Application.”

Announcement of fellowship awards will be made in January 2019. All questions should be directed to Jason Mierek, Director of Operations of the HWW Consortium, at [email protected].

Jan
19
Sat
Summer Institute in Biological Approaches to the Social Sciences
Jan 19 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation – 2019 Summer Institutes

Summer Institute in Biological Approaches to the Social Sciences

Dates:  June 10 – 14, 2019                                   

Application Deadline: January 15, 2019

The Russell Sage Foundation, in conjunction with the JPB Foundation, is sponsoring the first Summer Institute in Biological Approaches to the Social Sciences, a one-week workshop to be held at Northwestern University from June 10 – 14, 2019. This workshop is a broad introduction to human biological systems and will consist of didactic lectures, breakout sessions, and laboratory exercises. Attendees will (1) develop an understanding of the conceptual basis for integrating the social and biological sciences, (2) learn about the physiology of major bodily systems, and (3) gain familiarity with methods to analyze human biological processes. The target audience is post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty in the social sciences within 10 years of the PhD; applications from advanced graduate students will also be considered.  Most participant costs, including housing, meals, and travel will be covered. Detailed information about the summer institute and applying can be found here:https://www.russellsage.org/summer-institutes.

Questions should be directed to Greg Miller at [email protected].

Feb
11
Mon
Summer Institute in Social Science Genomics
Feb 11 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation – 2019 Summer Institutes

Summer Institute in Social Science Genomics

Dates:  June 9 – 21, 2019                                      

Application Deadline: February 11, 2019

The Russell Sage Foundation, in conjunction with the JPB Foundation, will sponsor the third Summer Institute in Social-Science Genomics from June 9 – 21, 2019 in Santa Barbara, California. The purpose of this two-week workshop is to introduce graduate students and beginning faculty in economics, sociology, psychology, political science, statistics, genetics, and other disciplines to the methods of social-science genomics—the analysis of genomic data in social science research. The program will include the interpretation and estimation of different concepts of heritability; the biology of genetic inheritance, gene expression, and epigenetics; design and analysis of genetic-association studies; analysis of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions; estimation and use of polygenic scores; as well as applications of genomic data in the social sciences. Participation is restricted to Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers, and untenured faculty within 10 years of the Ph.D. Most participant costs, including housing, meals, and travel will be covered. Detailed information about the summer institute and applying can be found here:  https://www.russellsage.org/summer-institutes.

Questions should be directed to Dan Benjamin at [email protected].

Feb
20
Wed
Summer Institute in Computational Social Science
Feb 20 all-day

Russell Sage Foundation – 2019 Summer Institutes

Summer Institute in Computational Social Science

Dates:  June 16 – 29, 2019                                   

Application Deadline:  February 20, 2019

The Russell Sage Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation will sponsor the third Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, to be held at Princeton University from June 16 – 29, 2019. The purpose of the two-week institute is to introduce graduate students and beginning faculty in the social and data sciences (broadly conceived) to computational social science—the use of digital-age data sources and methods to conduct social research. The program will highlight issues about access, privacy, and confidentiality that are raised by the emergence of computational data and methods. In addition to the event at Princeton, there will also be partner locations run by alumni of the 2017 and 2018 Summer Institute, which will be hosted at other universities. Participation is restricted to Ph.D. students, postdoctoral researchers, and untenured faculty within 7 years of the Ph.D. Most participant costs, including housing, meals, and travel will be covered. We welcome applicants from all backgrounds and fields of study, especially applicants from groups currently under-represented in computational social science. Detailed information about the summer institute and applying can be found here:  https://www.russellsage.org/summer-institutes.

Questions should be directed to Chris Bail at [email protected].

May
20
Mon
One-Day Workshop:  The Social Contract in an Era of (Post-)Neoliberalism and Populism
May 20 all-day

One-Day Workshop:  The Social Contract in an Era of (Post-)Neoliberalism and Populism

21st of June 2019, Department of Anthropology, UCL

Keynote speaker: Dr Sian Lazar (University of Cambridge)

Organisers: Miranda Sheild Johansson (UCL), Gwen Burnyeat (UCL)

We invite papers that contemplate the social contract through themes such as political change, the public good, bureaucracy, good governance, public policy, crime, social movements, state-society negotiations and fiscal relations, among others. We are open to exploratory papers in early stages of linking existing ethnographic data and analysis to a discussion of the social contract. This is an excellent opportunity for PhD and early career researchers to meet each other and receive feedback from our discussants and keynote speaker, and we anticipate that the workshop will result in a special issue proposal to a political anthropology journal.

The workshop will take place on Friday 21st of June and consist of three panels. Dr Sian Lazar will give a keynote at the end of the day. To participate please submit a title, abstract (max 250 words) and short bio or CV to Miranda [email protected] and Gwen [email protected] by Mon the 20th of May. We will inform all applicants of the outcome of their submissions by Friday the 24th of May. Lunch, tea/coffee will be provided and there is some funding for travel.

 Feel free to contact either of us with any questions ˗ Miranda  [email protected] and Gwen [email protected]

 While 20th century contractarians, e.g. John Rawls, agree that state-society relations are not the result of actual contracts, but rather conquest, usurpation or gradual shifts in institutions that do not require a conscious opt-in, the social contract as a metaphor, or a set of mutual and varied expectations remains a powerful way for people, governments and social scientists to conceptualise state-society relations and assess political legitimacy. From notions of reciprocity (a citizen perceiving paying tax as a productive exchange with the state, Bjӧrklund Larsen 2018), and rejections of ‘the public’ under neoliberalism (citizens that prefer autonomy to state protection, Abelin 2012), to culture clashes brought on by competing logics of bureaucracy and everyday life (Mathur 2014), and contradictory affects and expectations towards states in conflict regions (Ramírez 2011), social contract theory is ever present in anthropological analysis. Today, in the context of global political transformations toward post-neoliberal and populist models, the concept has gained further traction. The purpose of this workshop is to bring together recent ethnographic research on state-society engagements to analyse the utility and meaning of the social contract today, both as an everyday emic category employed by research participants, and as a political philosophy category within anthropology.