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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Sep
30
Sun
2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop
Sep 30 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop

Humanities Without Walls (HWW) is a consortium of humanities centers and institutes at 15 major research universities throughout the Midwest and beyond. Based at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), the HWW consortium is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In summer 2019, HWW is holding its second national, in-residence summer workshop for doctoral students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system. Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF)—a leading public humanities organization—designs and runs the summer workshop in consultation with HWW. Through a series of workshops, talks, and field trips, participants learn how to leverage their skills and training towards careers in the private sector, the non-profit world, arts administration, public media and many other fields.

We invite applications from doctoral students pursuing degree in the humanities and humanistic social sciences to participate in this three-week, in-residence summer workshop. This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be made to HWW by each university. To be considered, interested doctoral students must submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018.

About the Workshop: Launched in 2015 as an initiative of the HWW consortium, the workshop welcomes thirty participants each summer from higher education institutions across the United States. HWW Summer Workshop Fellows work in a variety of academic disciplines. They are scholars and practitioners who bring experience in community building, museum curation, filmmaking, radio programming, social media, project management, research, writing, and teaching. They are invested in issues of social justice and seek ways to bring humanistic values, insights, and skills to the public and private sectors.

In the spirit of practice-oriented learning, HWW and CHF partner with entities such as IDEO, a design and consulting firm, to lead students in real-world problem-solving exercises around important contemporary issues. Recognizing that each fellow’s skillset has been primarily oriented toward an academic track, the workshop includes sessions on values-based career planning, resume and cover letter construction, networking, and social media strategies from experts in career development.

Graduates from the workshop will emerge with a network of contacts in a range of professional realms; a significantly broadened sense of the career possibilities that await humanities PhDs; a cohort of HWW Summer Workshop Fellows (and friends!) from whom they may draw support and advice; and a set of resources aimed at helping them advance into the various realms considered under the broad rubric of “the public humanities.”

Where: Chicago, Illinois. Most weekday workshop events will take place at the Genevieve and Wayne Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church, 126 E. Chestnut St (at N. Michigan Ave.). The workshop also includes site visit to organizations around the city.

This is an in-residence workshop. As such, all participants, regardless of regular place of domicile, will be housed in private apartments. The costs of lodging are included in the fellowship. Staying in the provided housing is required as a condition of acceptance this fellowship. Details about lodging will be provided to those selected for the workshop.

When: Summer 2019—July 15th through August 2nd. Workshop sessions take place from approximately 9am to 5pm, Monday through Friday, for three weeks. Fellows are required to attend all workshop events and are strongly discouraged from traveling during the workshop. While there are no events scheduled during weekends, the CHF will circulate a list of interesting and exciting activities happening around Chicago that students are welcome to explore on their own.

Eligibility: All applicants must be enrolled in a doctoral degree program in a humanities or humanistic social science discipline at a PhD-granting institution within the United States. Applicants may be at any stage of their doctoral work, but they cannot have already received the doctoral degree at the time the workshop takes place. Ideally, applicants will have completed some coursework towards their doctoral degree, and they may have been advanced to candidacy but are not yet finishing their dissertations. International students are eligible to apply, but are responsible for confirming their registration and eligibility status at their home universities; HWW is not responsible for issuing visa paperwork.

Fellowship Prize: Each fellow will receive a $5,000 prize intended to cover travel to and from the summer workshop, most meals, and all incidentals. Fellows will be expected to arrange and pay for their own travel using the funds from this prize. The Chicago Humanities Festival will be arranging housing for all fellows in Chicago near the Gratz Center. All fellows are expected to attend the entire workshop for the entire three weeks and to stay in the provided housing.

Application Requirements: Interested doctoral students in the humanities should submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Combine and submit all application materials as a single PDF file.

The application file should contain:

  • A completed application cover sheet.
  • A narrative (1,000 words maximum) explaining the applicant’s intended career trajectory and addressing the following questions:
    • What is your experience with the “public humanities”?
    • Why are you interested in attending the workshop?
    • What kinds of knowledge are you seeking from the workshop?
    • What do you hope to achieve as a result of attending the workshop?
    • How do you envision sharing what you learn at the workshop with your department, campus, and beyond?
  • CV (two pages maximum),
  • Two letters of recommendation. One letter should be from the applicant’s primary adviser/dissertation chair; both should emphasize the applicant’s fit for this workshop.

Application Procedures: This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be subnitted to HWW from any given university.

Interested students must submit the application materials listed above to their universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Please do not submit your applications directly to HWW.

Humanities Center Directors, Graduate College Deans, or equivalents should submit the application for their nominee by 5:00 pm CDT on November 2nd, 2018. Applications should be submitted to [email protected] as a single PDF file attached to an email with the subject line “2019 Predoc Application.”

Announcement of fellowship awards will be made in January 2019. All questions should be directed to Jason Mierek, Director of Operations of the HWW Consortium, at [email protected].

Oct
1
Mon
AAS Emerging Fields Workshop: Law, Society, and Justice
Oct 1 all-day

The Association for Asian Studies calls for proposals from early career scholars, early career practitioners, and advanced graduate students (near candidacy or PhD candidates) to participate in a workshop on Law, Society, and Justice, Friday May 17 through Sunday May 19, 2019 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

We welcome participation by early career scholars, practitioners, and scholar-practitioners both inside and outside the university engaged in research about law, society, and justice in Asia. If selected for the workshop, you will be expected to submit a 5,000-7,000 word piece that exemplifies and situates your research contribution to the field of law, society, and justice in Asia, which will be due on 1 March 2019. You may submit a full chapter or article it if falls within the word limit, or may submit a distillation or shorter version of such a piece. Senior and junior colleagues will offer written and dialogic commentary on this pre-circulated writing by participants and engage each other in broader discussions about the field. In addition to timely submission of your own full paper, you will also need to be prepared to read and write one page of comments on each of the other 12-15 participants’ submissions by 5 May 2019. We also hope to have other activities such as professional development, and discussion of publication strategies, as well as career opportunities. Participants are expected to stay for the entire workshop; this means you will need to arrive the preceding Thursday and depart no earlier than mid-afternoon on Sunday.

We invite one-page (single spaced) proposals that summarize your intended submission for the workshop. For consideration, please send your one-page summary along with your CV (two-page maximum) to https://asianstudies.wufoo.com/forms/qoj7n9602kyg77/ by 1 October 2018. While current AAS membership is not required at the time of application, if accepted to the workshop participants must become members of the Association for Asian Studies or renew their lapsed memberships. News of acceptance will be made by 1 December 2018. Travel, lodging, and meals will be covered by the AAS, with the generous support of the Henry Luce Foundation.

Anyone with questions about the workshop or application process is asked to contact the co-organizers, Jennifer Gaynor ([email protected]) and Tyrell Haberkorn ([email protected]).

Please see the AAS website for the full call for proposals: http://www.asian-studies.org/AAS-Emerging-Fields-Workshop-Law-Society-and-Justice

Oct
5
Fri
Call for Applications: The Berlin Prize 2019/2020
Oct 5 all-day

The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2019/2020, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, questions of race in comparative perspective, and the interplay of exile and return.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester, but shorter stays of six to eight weeks are also possible. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

Fellowships are restricted to US citizens and permanent residents. Candidates in academic disciplines must have completed a PhD at the time of application. Candidates working in other fields—such as journalism, film, law, or public policy—must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers should have published at least one book at the time of application.

Please note that Berlin Prizes for visual artists, composers, and poets are determined in invitation-only competitions.

We will accept applications as of late May 2018. Following a peer-reviewed evaluation process, an independent Selection Committee reviews finalist applications. The 2019/2020 Berlin Prizes will be announced in late April 2019.

For further information and to apply online, please see: http://www.americanacademy.de/apply/apply-for-a-fellowship/

The application deadline for 2019/20 is Friday, October 5, 2018 (12 noon EST or 6 pm CET).

Oct
6
Sat
CFP: 40th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association
Oct 6 all-day

CFP:   40th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association, March 7-9, 2019  Kansas City, Missouri: EXPLORATIONS 

The NCSA conference committee invites proposals that examine the theme of explorations in the history, literature, art, music and popular culture of the nineteenth century.

Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome from North American, British, European, Asian, African and worldwide perspectives.

From the early nineteenth century, when Lewis and Clark paddled through the Kansas City area on their way up the Missouri River to explore the North American continent, through the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, the building of factories and railroads, the mechanization of agriculture, and the advent of mass-produced cultural artifacts, the American Midwest became a crossroads for explorers and inventors, hucksters and entrepreneurs, artists and musicians, poets and dreamers who pursued their discoveries toward destinations made possible by the wide-open spaces of the Great Plains. In this way, the Kansas City region is emblematic of a larger set of trends in the global evolution of culture that radically altered the fundamental conditions of human existence during the nineteenth century.

  • How does the discovery of new geographical knowledge change the perception of human possibility?
  • How do innovations in science and technology affect the development of literature, music and art?
  • How does the recovery of previously unheard voices – of women, of workers, of ethnic minorities and people of color – influence the understanding of social history in America and the wider world?
  • Topics for investigation include encounters between Western explorers and indigenous people; the impact of steamships and railways upon changing perceptions of time and space; resistance and accommodation between traditional folkways and mass-produced culture; and the development of new idioms in literature, art and music to express the broader horizons of nineteenth-century self-awareness.

Proposals are due by September 30, 2018. Send 300-word abstracts (as an email attachment in MS Word format) along with a one-page CV to [email protected]

Call for Roundtable Proposals:  Roundtable discussions provide conference attendees the opportunity to engage in spirited conversation and collaborative exchange of information and resources. The format of roundtable discussions will be lively, interactive discourse among presenters and conference participants, not lecture or panel-style delivery. Roundtable sessions will be 80 minutes long. Presenters should regard themselves primarily as facilitators and should limit their own prepared remarks to five minutes or less. Extensive collaboration among the presenters before the conference is encouraged, since the goal is to foster extensive, diverse, and cogent perspectives on interdisciplinary research topics of general interest to NCSA members. Roundtables should be pre-organized by a group of 4-8 presenters. To propose a roundtable topic, please send a single 300-word abstract describing the general topic of the roundtable (as an email attachment in MS Word format) to [email protected].

Your abstract should include the proposed session title and the full name of each presenter, with their email and phone contacts, job title and affiliation. Indicate which presenter has agreed to serve as discussion moderator. Please be sure to confirm the participation of all presenters before submitting your abstract.

Roundtable proposals are due by September 30, 2018.

Conference Venue: The conference will be held at the newly renovated Marriott Country Club Plaza in midtown Kansas City, adjacent to the open-air shops and restaurants of the Country Club Plaza and in easy walking distance of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.  Conference Registration will open in December 2018. AV requirements are due January 1, early registration closes on January 20, and registration ends on February 20.  Conference website: http://www.ncsaweb.net/Current-Conference

Oct
9
Tue
Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference (EPIC) @ East-West Center
Oct 9 – Oct 12 all-day

EPIC is the premier international gathering on the current and future practice of ethnography and design in the business world.

EPIC people create better business strategies, processes, and products, as well as enhance people’s lives, by illuminating the arc of social change through theory and practice. Our conference is a diverse gathering of interdisciplinary scholars and practitioners from every industry, including Fortune-500 companies, technology firms, management consultancies and design studios, universities and NGOs, public policy organizations and think tanks. Through the formal program and informal networking opportunities, EPIC attendees share leading expertise, gain new knowledge and skills, find business partners and opportunities, and make the invaluable connections that have grown EPIC into an essential, year-round community.

Conference submissions go through a rigorous, double-blind peer review process and are published in open access proceedings accessible through AnthroSource and epicpeople.org/intelligences.

Information about past conference is available here.

Oct
12
Fri
Impact of Tool Use and Technology on the Evolution of the Human Mind @ UCSD/Salk Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA)
Oct 12 @ 1:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Join the live webcast! “Impact of Tool Use and Technology on the Evolution of the Human Mind” is the topic of a free public symposium hosted by the UCSD/Salk Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) on Friday, October 12th (1:00 – 5:30 pm PT), co-chaired by Tim White (UC Berkeley) and Patricia Churchland (UC SanDiego)

We “behaviorally modern humans” likely emerged more than 100,000 years ago in Africa, spread across the continent and eventually the planet, effectively replacing all closely related and potentially competitive species.  There are many possible explanations for this, but one key to our consistent success in such replacement was the ongoing co-evolution of the human brain/mind with tool use and technology that actually began much earlier – all the way back to the use of simple stone implements millions of years ago – and continues with computers today.

Nine experts in the field will address this important gene-culture co-evolutionary process in anthropogeny at all levels, beginning with the potential link between early stone tool use and the parallel expansion of the human brain.  We’ll explore humans’ control of fire and the invention of projectile weapons, all the way through reading and writing to current-day technologies such as computers and 3D reality, as well as look to the potential future of the human mind under the impact of continually evolving culture.

Comparisons with other living and extinct species will be made, and we’ll touch on other relevant cognitive features unusually well-developed in humans, such as language, theory of mind and cooperation.

Join us to explore answers to a question first posed by Alfred Russel Wallace: How did the human mind originally evolve such remarkable capabilities in Africa, ‘in advance of its needs’? After all, even today no human is born with the genetic capability to make even simple stone tools!

Access the live webcast here on October 12:

https://carta.anthropogeny.org/events/impact-tool-use-and-technology-evolution-human-mind

Oct
15
Mon
Call for Proposals: Research Related to 2018 Hurricane Season
Oct 15 all-day

Dear Colleague Letter: NSF ENG, GEO, and SBE Directorates Accepting Proposals for Research Related to the 2018 Hurricane Season

Through this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), the Directorates for Engineering (ENG), Geosciences (GEO), and the Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) encourage the submission of proposals that address challenges related to Hurricane Florence, similar events that could occur in the coming weeks, and their aftermaths. These directorates support fundamental science and engineering research projects whose results enable families, communities, businesses, institutions, and governments to better prepare for, respond to, and recover from future catastrophic events. With this DCL, NSF seeks to support research on new science and engineering questions posed by such natural disasters, primarily those that require immediate, time-sensitive data collection and other research activities to advance basic science.

The ENG, GEO, and SBE directorates invite proposals to support time-sensitive research seeking to address the challenges related to Hurricane Florence and any other hurricanes that might occur in the United States prior to October 31, 2018. Rapid Response Research (RAPID) proposals may be submitted to conduct new research related to these hurricanes. Although NSF accepts RAPID proposals at any time, Hurricane Florence-related RAPID awards proposals must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. submitter’s local time on October 15, 2018.

Submission Guidelines: The RAPID funding mechanism supports projects for which there is an urgent need for data, facilities, or specialized equipment that can be utilized for quick-response research about natural disasters. RAPID proposal project descriptions are expected to be brief. They may not exceed five pages. Requests may be up to $200,000 and up to one year in duration. See the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) Chapter II.E.1 for instructions on preparation of a RAPID proposal. Proposals submitted pursuant to this DCL must designate the proposal as being related to this DCL by including “2018 Hurricane Season:” at the beginning of the proposal title.

To submit a RAPID request, investigators must contact the ENG, GEO, or SBE Program Officer most closely related to the proposal topic before submitting to determine if the proposed activities meet NSF’s guidelines for these types of submissions or whether the proposed work is more suitable for submission as a regular research proposal.

Proposals submitted pursuant to this DCL may request the use of NSF-funded advanced computing resources such as Blue Waters or Stampede2. In these cases, investigators must contact the NSF Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (OAC) prior to submission of the proposal.

Research proposals relating to a better fundamental understanding of storms and their impacts (physical, biological and societal), human aspects of natural disasters (including first responders and the public), means of improving emergency response methods, and approaches that promise to reduce future damage also are welcome. NSF continues to support fundamental science and engineering research projects whose results on the topics listed above are not time-sensitive. Such proposals should be submitted to standing programs and competitions according to their established deadlines.

Investigators with general questions are advised to contact one of the following Directorate liaisons:

ENG: Joy Pauschke, [email protected], (703) 292-7024
GEO: Chungu Lu, [email protected], (703) 292-8524
SBE: Robert (Bob) O’Connor, [email protected], (703) 292-7263

Oct
17
Wed
2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society @ Buffalo Niagara County Convention Center
Oct 17 – Oct 20 all-day

The 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society

October 17-20, 2018

Buffalo Niagara County Convention Center
Buffalo, New York, USA

No Illusions, No Exclusions

“No Illusions, No Exclusions,” the theme for the 2018 AFS Annual Meeting, is inspired by its location in Buffalo, New York, “The City of No Illusions.”

Buffalo is proudly gutsy, realistic, highly vernacular and inclusive. The city openly welcomes recent refugees, who enhance the substantial diversity brought about by its remarkable industrial heritage and legacy of Native Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) First Nations. Buffalo’s post-industrial transformation brings with it challenges of gentrification, reconfiguration of the labor force and new symbolic strategies of self- representation.

Participants in the annual meeting are encouraged to explore how at this divisive moment in American life, folklore confronts economic and social disruptions, builds community resilience and sustains pluralism amidst threats to E Pluribus Unum.

As a discipline, folklore cannot stand in isolation from other fields as it shapes and is shaped by other disciplines while endeavoring to sustain itself as an autonomous discipline. In considering folklore as both academic discipline and public practice, participants are encouraged to examine how folklore engages community members as partners, valuing local knowledge and facilitating cultural self-determination.

 

Learn more about the meeting at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2018AM.

 

We invite students and colleagues from Buffalo to join us; no registration fee required. We ask that you sign in at the registration desk, then sample, circulate, introduce yourselves, and learn more about folklore as a profession and a perspective.

 

Contact info:          Lorraine Walsh Cashman

812-856-2422

[email protected]

National Humanities Center Residential Fellowships, 2019-20
Oct 17 all-day

Become a Fellow at the National Humanities Center

The National Humanities Center will offer up to 40 residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities for the period September 2019 through May 2020. Applicants must have a doctorate or equivalent scholarly credentials. Mid-career and senior scholars are encouraged to apply. Emerging scholars with a strong record of peer-reviewed work may also apply. The Center does not support the revision of doctoral dissertations.

In addition to scholars from all fields of the humanities, the Center accepts individuals from the natural and social sciences, the arts, the professions, and public life who are engaged in humanistic projects. The Center is international in scope and welcomes applications from scholars outside the United States. The National Humanities Center does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, handicap, sexual orientation, or age. We are dedicated to fair treatment, diversity, and inclusion.

Facilities and Services

The Center provides a rich intellectual setting for individual research and the exchange of ideas. Located in the progressive Triangle region of North Carolina, near Chapel Hill, Durham, and Raleigh, the Center affords access to the vibrant cultural and intellectual communities supported by the area’s research institutes, universities, and dynamic arts scene. The stunning Archie K. Davis building includes private studies for Fellows, conference rooms, a central commons for dining, lounges, and reading areas.

The Center’s renowned library services provide Fellows with all necessary research materials. Prior to arrival, Fellows may arrange to have their home libraries essentially replicated in their Center studies so that all reference works and other frequently used sources are ready-to-hand from the outset. The Center’s library service supports Fellows by fulfilling thousands of requests for books and other research materials from our partner institutions in the Triangle, usually within 24 hours, and from libraries around the world.

Each year, scholars form their own seminars and study groups depending on cohort members’ shared research interests, although participation in these groups is always optional. Breakfasts and lunches are provided each weekday in the Center commons to ensure that scholars can get the most out of their uninterrupted research time and to foster conversations across disciplines in an informal and convivial setting. The Center also maintains a vibrant program of scholarly events and conferences and pursues an active public outreach program. Fellows are invited to participate in these activities and may contribute to the Center’s programs in humanities education and public engagement.

Areas of Special Interest

Most of the Center’s fellowships are unrestricted. Several, however, are designated for particular areas of research, including fellowships for environmental studies, English literature, art history, Asian studies, theology, and for early-career female philosophers. The Center also invites applicants from scholars in interdisciplinary fields, including African-American studies, area studies, bioethics, cultural studies, history of science and technology, film and media studies.

Stipends

The amounts awarded are individually determined, according to the needs of the Fellow and the Center’s ability to meet them. The Center seeks to provide half salary up to $65,000 with the expectation that a Fellow’s home institution will cover the remaining salary. The Center also covers travel expenses to and from North Carolina for Fellows and dependents living with the Fellow in North Carolina during the fellowship.

Support

Fellowships are supported by the Center’s own endowment, private foundation grants, contributions from alumni and friends, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

For More Information

Oct
18
Thu
African American Digital Humanities 2018
Oct 18 – Oct 20 all-day

Intentionally Digital. Intentionally Black.
African American Digital Humanities 2018
University of Maryland
October 18-20, 2018

Call for Proposals
What happens to digital humanities inquiry when we begin with Black culture, Black thought, and Black persons at the center of our endeavors? How does this shift challenge and expand both the humanities and the digital? What happens to Black and African American humanities research when we lead with the digital?

Interdisciplinary inquiry into both the online practices of black users and humanities research focused on black history and culture using digital tools has expanded in the past decade. Too often, this work happens on the margins of established disciplines, boundaries, and paradigms. Rather than arriving at black digital research as an afterthought or a tactic to achieve “diversity”, privileging black theory and black culture in our scholarship can provide alternate paradigms through which to understand the digital and the humanistic.

The first national conference of the African American Digital Humanities (AADHum) Initiative atthe University of Maryland will explore how digital studies and digital humanities-based research, teaching, and community projects can center African American history and culture. AADHum invites submissions that may include scholarly inquiry into Black diasporic and African American uses of digital technologies; digital humanities projects that focus on black history and culture; race and digital theory; the intersection of black studies and digital humanities; information studies, cultural heritage, and community-based digital projects; pedagogical interventions; digital tools and artifacts; black digital humanities and memory; social media and black activism/movements, etc.

Proposal Submissions
We invite submissions from within and outside the academy – students, faculty, librarians, independent scholars and community members – to actively participate in the conference! Proposals are due by April 9, 2018.

• Proposals should be submitted online at https://www.conftool.pro/aadhum2018/
• Multiple proposal submissions (maximum of 3 submissions) from an individual or group are acceptable
• Selections and notifications will be made by mid-June 2018

Types of Proposals
· Individual papers. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words and brief bio (75 words).
· Panels. Please provide a panel rationale of no more than 300 words, with individual paper abstracts (150-300 words) for up to 5 participants. Include titles and institutional affiliations for each participant.
· Digital Posters. Posters may present work on any relevant topic in any stage of development. Poster presentations are intended to be interactive, providing the opportunity to exchange ideas one-on-one with attendees. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words.
· Tools/Digital project demonstration. Tools/Digital Project demonstrations are intended to showcase near-complete or completed work in an interactive environment. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words. Abstracts should include 1) research significance, 2) stage (near complete/complete), 3) intervention of platform/project/tool 4) demonstration requirements (technology).
· Roundtables. Please provide a rationale of no more than 300 words, accompanied by a list of 4-5 participants (including title and institutional affiliation).

For each proposal please include 3-5 keywords.

  • Examples of topics
  • Abundance and deprivation
  • Activism
  • Africa and the Americas
  • Afro-futurism, -pragmatism and -pessimism
  • Agency and movements
  • Anti-racisms
  • Archives and archival practices
  • Arts and visual cultures
  • Blackness in everyday life
  • Comparative Blackness
  • Cyber/digital feminism
  • Digital presence
  • Digital slave studies
  • Ethics
  • Empirical and epistemological considerations
  • Evaluating digital scholarship
  • Intersectionality
  • Gaming
  • Languages and literatures
  • Local and regional history
  • Memory and commemoration
  • Methods and tools
  • Migration and movement
  • Mobile technologies
  • Pedagogy
  • Performance studies
  • Platform studies
  • Poetics and aesthetics
  • Public humanities
  • Sexualities
  • Social media
  • Space and place
  • Systems of institutional power
  • Within and beyond the academy
  • Youth cultures

About AADHum
The AADHum Initiative (Synergies among African American History and Culture and Digital Humanities) at the University of Maryland is an initiative funded in part by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. AADHum seeks to prepare the next generation of scholars and scholarship by facilitating critical dialogue between digital humanists and African American centered humanities scholarship. The Initiative works to expand the reach of the digital humanities into African American/Africana/Black Studies while enriching humanities research with new methods, archives, and tools. This initiative enhances digital research while recognizing the expertise and knowledge from traditional humanities research and how it may propel digital scholarship forward. In so doing, it fosters a dialogue among a community of scholars from within and outside the academy as they venture into new research and pedagogical endeavors.

Please direct all questions to [email protected]