Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to ancalendar@americananthro.org.

 

May
1
Mon
CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: IVAN KARP DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARDS FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SOUTH AFRICAN Ph.D. PROGRAMMES
May 1 all-day

AFRICAN CRITICAL INQUIRY PROGRAMME

“Who defines the needs of the people and the related

epistemologies that serve them?” (Karp & Masolo 2000:10)

 CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

IVAN KARP DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARDS

FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN

SOUTH AFRICAN Ph.D. PROGRAMMES

Closing Date: Monday 1 May 2017

The African Critical Inquiry Programme is pleased to announce the 2017 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards to support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled at South African universities and conducting dissertation research on relevant topics. Grant amounts vary depending on research plans, with a maximum award of ZAR 40,000.

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ELIGIBILITY: The Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards are open to African postgraduate students (regardless of citizenship) in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Applicants must be currently registered in a Ph.D. programme in a South African university and be working on topics related to ACIP’s focus. Awards will support doctoral research projects focused on topics such as institutions of public culture, particular aspects of museums and exhibitions, forms and practices of public scholarship, culture and communication, and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Applicants must submit a dissertation proposal that has been approved by their institution to confirm the award; this must be completed before they begin ACIP-supported on-site research or by December 2017, whichever comes first.

Find more information and access the application at: http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html.

Center for Communal Studies Research Travel Grant @ Center for Communal Studies, University of Southern Indiana
May 1 all-day

Research Travel Grant

The Center for Communal Studies at the University of Southern Indiana annually invites applications for a Research Travel Grant to fund research at the Communal Studies Collection at USI’s David L. Rice Library. The Communal Studies Collection’s rich archival materials hold information on over 600 historic and contemporary communal societies, utopias and intentional communities. A complete listing of communities can be found on the Rice Library website. Strengths include materials on the Harmonists and Owenites who settled nearby New Harmony, Indiana, but the breadth of the collections covers American communalism more broadly. Applicants may be graduate students or established scholars in the United States or abroad from any discipline that involves the study of communalism (such as history, English, anthropology, economics, sociology, etc.). The grant will fund research up to $2,000 to be used by June 30 of the subsequent year. All applications must include a letter detailing the project and its significance to communal studies, a proposed budget and a vita. Applications are due annually by 1 May. The winner of this Research Travel Grant is announced annually in June 2017.

Submissions from USI students and faculty are welcome. Click here to visit our website.

 

Please send materials as email attachments to Casey Harison at charison@usi.edu.

May
2
Tue
CASCA/IUAES2017 Conference in Ottawa
May 2 – May 7 all-day

International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES) and Canadian Anthropology Society (CASCA)

The Conference/InterCongress will be hosted at the University of Ottawa, on the unceded, traditional territory of the Algonquins of the Ottawa River Watershed. Canada’s capital city is built on the banks of the Kitchisippi, the Great River, the Ottawa River; the Sacred Chaudière Falls and Islands have served as a meeting place of great spiritual importance to the people of North America since time immemorial. In 2017, Canada celebrates its 150 birthday. Join us for our Conference/InterCongress May 2-7 2017, in the National Capital Region!

The calls for papers, posters and audiovisal media are now open. The calls will close on 19th December.

Decisions on panel proposals have been communicated to proposers. The accepted panels are now displayed on the site and are open to proposals of both solicited and unsolicited papers. Plead read both the conference theme and the CFP before proposing your work.

We welcome proposals from the IUAES commissions, CASCA members and colleagues from all over the world, whether they are current members of the associations or not.

Conference Convener
Scott Simon (University of Ottawa)

Advisory Committee
IUAES: Faye Harrison, Junji Koizumi, Thomas Reuter, Heather O’Leary
CASCA: Donna Patrick, Christine Jourdan, Nicola Mooney, Lorne Holyoak

Scientific Committee
Chairs: Mugsy Spiegel (IUAES) and Julie Laplante (CASCA)
IUAES: East Asia: Junji Koizumi, Southeast Asia and China: Zhang Jijiao, South Asia: Subhadra Channa, Russia:  Viacheslav Rudnev (Commission chair), Europe: Noel Salazar (Commission chair), Africa: Mugsy Spiegel, Latin America: Gustavo Lins Ribeiro, US: Faye Harrison
CASCA: Michel Bouchard, Ari Gandsman, Julie Laplante, André Tremblay, Ellen Judd, Charles Menzies, Pauline McKenzie Aucoin

Local Organizing Committee
Scott Simon, Lorne Holyoak, Donna Patrick, Pauline McKenzie Aucoin, Ari Gandsman, Julie Laplante, David Jaclin (website content manager), Deborah Sick, Larisa Kurtovic, Meg Stalcup, Nicolas Rasiulis (operations manager), Mylène Mourgeon (operations manager), Thushara Hewage, Romola Vasantha Thumbadoo, Claudette Commanda

May
5
Fri
2017 Victor Turner Prize Competition
May 5 all-day

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology (SHA) announces the 25th annual juried competition for the Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing. The late Victor Turner devoted his career to seeking an accessible language that would reopen anthropology to the human subject, and the prize will be given in recognition of innovative books that further this project.

Eligible genres include single and co-authored ethnographic monographs, narratives, historical accounts, biographies, memoirs, dramas, or single-authored collections of essays, short stories, or poems. A $1,000 first-place, a $500 second place and a $250 third-place prize, for books published 2015 through 2017, will be awarded at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Washington, DC in November 2017.

Books may be entered into the competition by authors, book editors, or colleagues. No formal letter of nomination is needed. Books published in 2015-2016 entered in last year’s competition may be resubmitted this year with the appropriate entry fee.

Submission fee: For authors who are already SHA members, the entry fee is $25/book. For authors who are not SHA members, the entry fee is $75/book. (Publishers: for all books you submit, please check with the author first to discover whether s/he is a current SHA member and please encourage authors to join SHA). The fee may be paid either online here (log into Anthro Gateway to get the SHA member rate of $25), or by check (made out to the American Anthropological Association) with the Turner Submission-Fee-Form sent to:

Kathy Ano, Controller
American Anthropological Association
2300 Clarendon Blvd, Suite 1301
Arlington, VA 22201-3386 

Send one copy of the book to be entered to each of the four judges (a total of 4 copies): 

Victor Turner Prize,
c/o Karen Richman
230 McKenna Hall
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556

Victor Turner Prize,
c/o Cristiana Giordano
321 Young Hall
Department of Anthropology
One Shields Ave
University of California
Davis, CA 95616

Victor Turner Prize,
c/o Lisa Stevenson
Department of Anthropology
McGill University
Room 718, Leacock Building
855 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC H3A 2T7
Canada

Victor Turner Prize,
c/o Abigail Adams
Department of Anthropology
1615 Stanley Street
Central Connecticut State University
New Britain, CT 06053

All who enter the contest must include a cover letter with four items of required information:

  1. book title, publication year, and publisher,
  2. author’s contact information including mailing address, all telephone numbers and e-mail address;
  3. author’s biographical sketch (1-2 paragraphs) including highest degree awarded, discipline, and institution;
  4. current affiliation (university or otherwise).

Biographical information will be used for presenting the winners and publicizing the results of the competition and will not be used for judging the quality of the entries. Entrants may also include an optional short statement about intellectual training/ orientation, and the circumstances surrounding the research/ writing of the book.

Please send the cover letter and accompanying statements and biographical information to the chair of the Victor Turner Prize Committee, Karen Richman, krichman@nd.edu, 574-631-8146.

The deadline for receipt of the required materials is May 5, 2017.

All inquiries should be directed to Karen Richman, krichman@nd.edu.

http://sha.americananthro.org/2017/04/2017-victor-turner-prize-competition-deadline-may-5/

Extraordinary Variations of the Human Mind: Lessons for Anthropogeny Webcast
May 5 @ 1:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Join the live webcast!  “Extraordinary Variations of the Human Mind: Lessons for Anthropogeny” is the topic of a free public symposium hosted by the UCSD/Salk Center for Academic Research & Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) and the Kavli Institute for Brain & Mind (KIBM) on Friday, May 5th (1:00-5:30 pm PT), co-chaired by Daniel Geschwind (UCLA School of Medicine) and Isabelle Peretz (Univ of Montreal).

The human mind is one of the features that makes our species unusual, and any narrative of our origins must include explanations for how our mental facilities were generated by genetic and cultural evolutionary processes.  Comparative studies with other species and direct studies of how the typical human brain creates the mind are valuable approaches.  However, many useful clues can also be gleaned from studying extraordinary variations of the human mind.  This symposium brings together experts who have pursued in-depth explorations of some of these variations.

Access the live webcast here on May 5:
https://carta.anthropogeny.org/events/extraordinary-variations-human-mind-lessons-anthropogeny

May
11
Thu
Europe and its Immigrants in the 21st Century
May 11 – May 12 all-day

“Europe and Its Immigrants in the 21st Century,” to take place on May 11-12, 2017 in Zagreb, Croatia.

The themes of the discussion will include:

  • Managing international migration better: Principles and perspectives for gaining more from migration 
  • The challenge of integration in Europe 
  • Future demographic change in Europe: Contribution of migration 
  • The new role of immigrants in the economies of South-eastern Europe 
  • Building successful urban policy in the new era of migration 
  • Selecting economic migrants 
  • Integration processes of migrants: Research findings and policy lessons 
  • Migrants and the European labour market 
  • Migrants and immigration policy in Europe  

Please see the website: europeanimmigrationconference.com for more information including information on submitting abstracts. The conference is being organized by:

Centar za istraživanje Hrvatskog iseljeništva (Centre for Croatian diaspora studies)

Institut društvenih znanosti Ivo Pilar (Institute for Social Sciences Ivo Pilar)

Institut za migracije i narodnost (Institute for Migration and Ethnic Studies)

International Metropolis Project

May
15
Mon
Institutional Development Grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation
May 15 all-day

Institutional Development Grant from the Wenner-Gren Foundation 

The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research established the Institutional Development Grant (IDG) program in 2008. The IDG is intended to strengthen (or to support the development of) anthropological doctoral programs in countries where the discipline is underrepresented. The grant provides $25,000 per year, is renewable for a maximum of five years (total support of $125,000), and may be used for any purpose to achieve the academic development goals of the applicant department. A minimum of one new award will be made each year, and applicant departments are expected to have developed strong partnership arrangements with other anthropological institutions that can help them achieve their development goals.

Since the program’s inauguration, ten institutions have received IDG grants: The Central Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tribhuvan University, Nepal; The Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at Mongolian National University; The Museo Antropologia, National University of Cordoba, Argentina; The Anthropological Studies Program, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Philippines; The Department of Anthropology, Vietnam, National University, Hanoi, Vietnam; The Department of Social Anthropology, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia; The Faculté d’Ethnologie at Université d’Etat d’Haiti, Port-Au-Prince, Haiti; The Baltic States – University of Latvia, Riga Stradins University (Latvia), University of Tallinn (Estonia)  and Vytautus Magnus University (Lithuania); the Institut Fondamental d’Afrique Noire /University Cheikh Anta Diop of Dakar, Senegal, and The College Of Language And Culture Studies, Royal University Of Bhutan, Taktse, Trongsa, Bhutan.

The Institutional Development Grant has a two-stage application process: the submission of a preliminary inquiry, followed by the submission of a full application. The deadline for the mandatory preliminary inquiry is May 15, 2016. The preliminary inquiry must be submitted using the preliminary inquiry form, which can be downloaded from the Wenner-Gren website, at http://www.wennergren.org/programs/institutional-development-grants. The deadline for those applicants invited to submit a full application is September 15, 2017. Awards will be announced in November 2017 for programs beginning in January 2018.

Wenner-Gren Foundation

470 Park Avenue South, 8th Floor

New York, NY  10016  USA

Tel (212) 683-5000

Fax (212) 532-1492

General inquiries:  inquiries@wennergren.org

Institutional Development Grant inquiries:   development@wennergren.org

Vinson Sutlive Book Prize in Historical Anthropology
May 15 all-day

The Department of Anthropology at William & Mary is pleased to invite nominations for the first Vinson Sutlive Book Prize in Historical Anthropology.  The prize goes to the best book published in the prior year, in any discipline, that makes use of anthropological perspectives in order to examine historical contexts and/or the role of the past in the present.

Nominated books must be published in English during 2016. Anyone may nominate a book. Nominations should be accompanied by a nominating letter; send the letter no later than May 15, 2017 directly to each of the Sutlive book prize jurors.

Gillian Feeley-Harnik, University of Michigan
gfharnik@umich.edu

Jonathan Glasser, William & Mary
jglasser@wm.edu

Andrea Wright, William & Mary
agwright@wm.edu

May
19
Fri
Conference- The Cost of Freedom: Debt and Slavery @ Brooklyn College, City University of New York
May 19 – May 20 all-day

The Cost of Freedom: Debt and Slavery

A conference in the Fredric Ewen Series on Civil Liberties and Academic Freedom, 19-20 May 2017

Brooklyn College, City University of New York

The rhetorics of freedom and liberty permeate contemporary and historical political discourse. This language and its associated symbols is invariably positively connoted from the perspective of the speaker and the presumed audience. However, the associated values and defining principles shift dramatically in each social context. In short we can all agree freedom is good, but we cannot agree what it means to be free. One of the key sites of contention in such discourse is what needs to be sacrificed in order to achieve liberty and what costs are associated with the preservation of freedom. The valuation of liberty is directly linked to whose freedom is prioritized and who is seen as bearing the associated costs. All of this is especially true in any discussion of slavery.

The aim of this conference is to bring scholars from numerous disciplines into conversation across the historical timeline. Just as freedom and liberty are slippery concepts, so are ideas of debt, value, and payment. But rather than simply viewing these terms as rhetorical devices that make freedom seem worthwhile, we deploy debt, value,and payment as analytical tools for understanding how freedom works – while also keeping in mind that these are concepts that themselves demand investigation. These ideas unite the discourses of freedom and liberty, from ethical and economic discourses, which describe freedom as either physical labor or a mental activity, as well as the language of religion and science. Often our innumerable ways of assessing value bleed one into another, especially in conversations regarding individual and shared liberties.

By explicitly juxtaposing the different methodologies used in asking “what does freedom cost?” from Greco-Roman antiquity to the present, we hope to explore overlapping areas of research and help expand the existing conversations in each discipline. In addition to providing vocabularies, practices and theories of freedom that we still use today, Ancient Greece and Rome provide many examples of peoples who lacked freedom but strove to obtain it, including slaves, women and conquered peoples. By simultaneously examining the Greco-Roman antiquity and modernity, we bring to light recurrent historical patterns of the costs that people have and continue pay for freedom.

Our ultimate goal is to produce a rigorous edited volume of the most substantial and unified conference contributions for publication by a major university press.

Our confirmed keynote speakers include, Orlando Patterson (John Cowles Professor of Sociology, Harvard University), Saidiya Hartman (Professor, English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University) and Deborah Kamen (Associate Professor, Classics, University of Washington).  We are seeking contributions for at least four panels of 3-4 participants each.  We hope to attract participation from a wide range of academic disciplines and from scholars at all levels, and will try to reflect this diversity in our creation of each broad panel.  Examples of possible panel titles might be: “Themes of Freedom and Payment in the Novel”, “The Economics of Emancipation”, “Cross-Cultural Political Theories of Sacrifices and Liberty”, “Comparative Histories of Debt-Bondage”, or “The Shifting Demographics of Civil Liberties”.

 

We will be offering a minimum of six bursaries of up to 500 dollars to be awarded on the basis of greatest need, taking into account access to institutional funding and the distance of the conference from the participant’s home institution.

 

31 October 2016 is the deadline for the submission of abstracts. Please include the following as separate files:  (1) title, abstract of 300-500 words, a one page bibliography (no self identifying information please!); (2) your name, title of your proposed talk, institutional affiliation, short academic bio, and an indication of whether you’d like to be consider for a bursary, a budget for the amount requested, and any information we should take into consideration when making our bursary allocations.

These two files (PDF or MSWord preferred) should be sent to: c-f-p@debtandslavery.com

General questions on this conference should be sent to: queries@debtandslavery.com

 

We hope to notify successful applicants by 15 November.

31 March 2017 will be the deadline for submission of draft papers for pre-circulation among fellow panelists and organizers.

We will also invite poster submissions from undergraduates conducting research on related themes; the deadline for poster proposals will be 1 March 2017.

May
20
Sat
Anthropologies of the United States of America: Views from Near and from Afar CFP
May 20 all-day

Anthropologies of the United States of America: Views from Near and from Afar
International Conference
University of Palermo, June 15 – 16, 2017

This conference is an interdisciplinary research project intended for scholars from various fields. The aim is to discuss a historically, anthropologically and politically central country: the United States. Is it possible to see the United States as a country to be examined from multiple points of view – both from near and from afar – with particular interest in the current “anthropological” culture, while also paying attention to history and making predictions about the future? Specialists and enthusiasts from various backgrounds are invited to respond from specific perspectives, in order to compare and contrast different interpretations of the “American galaxy”. To this end, both studies of a theoretical nature and case studies are encouraged. The view from near and from afar, obviously a reference to Lévi-Strauss, alludes to a modus operandi anthropologically based on comparing and contrasting different perspectives. Anthropologists are directly concerned here, because it was in the United States that the much-discussed anthropological Postmodernism recently emerged, and because it was also in the United States that the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, based on studies of Native Americans, was conceived. The reference to “anthropologies” should therefore be viewed literally (anthropologists specializing in the United States in largely ethnographic terms) and with a culturally wider meaning (linguists, comparatists, geographers, semiologists, historians, etc., who observe American culture from their respective epistemological perspectives). The reference to the interdisciplinary nature of the conference, aside from being a theoretical inclination shared by the organizers, is a happy necessity for those who study a multicultural country like the United States, with its difficult past of coexistence between colonizers and natives, as well as between the different cultures of which it is composed today.

We offer the following suggestions as possible topics of discussion, from a comparative perspective or otherwise:

  • Native and non-native cultures
  • Ancient/recent migratory phenomena
  • Conformism/individualism
  • Multiculturalism and identity
  • Religious radicalization and New Age movements
  • Processes of globalization and local agency
  • American anthropology/other anthropologies
  • American literature/other literatures
  • The linguistic relativity hypothesis today
  • Everyday cultures
  • Tradition and modernity
  • Processes of homogenization and diversification of knowledge
  • Spaces of imagination
  • Places and non-places
  • Ecologies of landscape
  • Wilderness
  • Languages of power and knowledge
  • Current political situation
  • Politics of inclusion/exclusion
  • Oral histories
  • Etc.

Keynote speaker:
Vincent Crapanzano, City University of New York

Scientific board:
Stefano Montes and Matteo Meschiari

Administrative organization:
Dipartimento Culture e Società
Università degli Studi di Palermo
Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italia

For information and to submit proposals:
Stefano Montes (montes.stefano@tiscalinet.it)
Matteo Meschiari (matmeschiari@gmail.com)

Practical information:
Deadline for submitting proposals: 20 May 2017
Proposal summary and title: 250-300 words
Duration of presentations: 20 minutes
Conference languages: Italian, French and English
Conference participation is free of charge
Travel costs, accommodation expenses and meals are covered by participants or their institutions
Proceedings of the conference will be published