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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Mar
8
Fri
2019 Summer Repository Research Fellowship
Mar 8 all-day

The Indiana University Institute for Advanced Study is now accepting applications for its 2019 Summer Repository Research Fellowship (SRRF). This program funds a two-week residential fellowship for a community scholar or faculty member from outside Indiana University Bloomington to conduct in-depth research in the collections of one or more of our partner repositories. The fellowship provides funding for travel costs, accommodation, per diem, and a two-week stipend.

This program is particularly appropriate for projects that involve ongoing collaboration with Indiana University Bloomington repositories or departments and/or research collaborations involving IUB faculty members. We especially welcome applications from Minority Serving Institutions, community colleges, and source communities.

This initiative is intended to advance research in the rich collections of the IU Bloomington campus and to build partnerships between scholars at and beyond IUB. Please note: This fellowship supports research in IU Bloomington’s unique collections; the application should focus on materials that cannot be accessed elsewhere. Projects concentrating on items that can be purchased, borrowed through interlibrary loan, or utilized effectively from a distance via digital surrogates are not within the scope of this program.

Applications are due by March 8, 2019. Applicants must consult with a repository staff member about their proposed project and research logistics before submitting an application.

For the Summer 2019 program, we are partnering with more than a dozen archives, libraries, and museums on campus. For application materials, the complete list of partner repositories, and additional information, please visit our website at https://iasweb.webtest.iu.edu/research-support/fellows/summer-repo-research-fellowship/index.html

Questions about the fellowship should be addressed to IU IAS Associate Director Suzanne Godby Ingalsbe at [email protected]. Questions about collections, access, and similar issues should be directed to repository staff members.

Mar
10
Sun
Call for Applications for the International Summer School Problematizing Morality
Mar 10 all-day

Call for Applications for the International Summer School

Problematizing Morality

Ethnographic Approaches to the Normative Dimensions of Everyday Life

September 24 – 27, 2019 – Tübingen, Germany

 

In recent years, the social sciences have both undergone and propelled a “moral turn”, synchronized to an advancing moralization of public and political discourse and practice. Two main lines of argument infuse this turn: The location of morality and its relation to power. Morality should neither be conceived of as individual predispositions nor as discrete spheres of sociality. Instead, everyday life can be comprehend as imbued with moral valuation and reasoning: The social is ultimately the arena of the ethical. Considering the broad interest in researching morality and the normative dimensions of everyday life, this Summer School aims to provide a platform for early career researchers to contribute to these debates, facilitating international and interdisciplinary dialogue, and highlighting the dimension of morality as objects of study. By emphasizing the articulation of the moral to power and by refining conceptual differentiations (such as the inherent relation between morality and religion), the Summer School aims to sound out and deepen the understanding of the moral dimensions of social life by analyzing their “problematization”. In such problematizations morality comes into being as an object of reflection that can be contested and claimed. At their heart lies the nexus between morality and emotions. Morals are part of and informed by “emotional ideologies” resulting in perceptions which differ significantly and are prone for conflict.

 

We want to open a space for inquiring into the processes in which moral and ethical claims acquire normative power and how this normativity is contested; the ways actors practice and relate to these claims; how they navigate through moral conflicts; and finally how they envision, strive for and live a life that matters, conceived of as ‘good’ and ‘right’.

To this end, we welcome applications from ethnographers working on questions of morality from different disciplines and at different career stages (PhD students, postdocs and early-career scholars). Combining lectures, workshops, and master classes conducted by renowned scholars in the field, the Summer School offers profound theoretical input and different formats for exchange. These include the presentation of participants’ research, theoretical discussion, and time for reflecting methodological matters and research ethics.

 

Arenas of Problematization – Master Classes

  1. Power, Critique, Legitimacy: Standing on the right side

Moral conflicts are driven by and foster antagonal positions – the need to morally stand on the right side –, invested with claims for authority and legitimacy. The ambiguity of positioning in a continuum of possibilities is reduced to a dichotomous moral scheme. In moralized conflicts “legitimate” and “uninhabitable” positions evolve. This cluster seeks to address the normative (political, epistemic, emotional) regimes underlying questions of legitimacy and authority, as well as their contestation, the unfolding conflicts, and processes of hierarchization.

 

  1. Cohabitation, Fellowship, Conviviality: Being a good fellow human

If living is ultimately living with others, imaginaries of the good life contain ideas of proper cohabitation, solidarity and mutual obligation. On this ground, the Summer School asks how togetherness is organized along moral beliefs, thereby constituting social groups, but also disciplining members and creating “moral outsiders”. It inquires how actors position themselves as moral beings within and against their social surroundings, contesting established group-boundaries and opening new spaces of “being-with”.

 

  1. Subjectivity, Individuality, Self-Fashioning: Living a good life

The problematization of morality engenders different forms of ethical subjectivities, distributing differing modes of (individual) agency and responsibility. These processes of subjectivation can be understood as forms of self-governance based on introspection and reflexivity. This cluster seeks to address the ways in which actors navigate the expectations and practices of living a good, meaningful, successful life they are invested in – ranging from striving for happiness, joy, and a sense of purpose, to (alternative) ways of consumption, civic or environmental engagement.

 

Lecturers and Master Class Teachers

Prof. Dr. Jarrett Zigon (University of Virginia, USA)

Prof. Dr. Moritz Ege (University of Göttingen, Germany)

Dr. Tilmann Heil (University of Leuven, Belgium)

Prof. Dr. Pamela E. Klassen (University of Toronto, Canada)

 

Application

If you want to apply for participating the Summer School, please submit (in English):

  • Letter of Motivation (up to 1500 words), specifying your interest in the Summer School and its relation to your research profile
  • short CV
  • short Abstract (250 words) of the research project you would like to present, addressing one or more of the Summer School’s topics.

 

The deadline for submission is March 10, 2019 – 12 AM CET.

 

Applicants will be notified by the beginning of April 2019.

Please submit your application (incl. Letter of Motivation, CV, research abstract) in one pdf-document via email to [email protected]

 

Practical Matters

The participation fee of 35 EUR covers lunch and coffee breaks. The Summer School will be held in English.

Participants will be expected to give a 25-minute presentation on their current research in one of the master classes, to contribute to the discussion groups, and to participate in the Summer School in full.

Participants are expected to cover their travel and accommodation expenses. We can, however, offer free accommodation for up to 10 participants. Additionally, we hope to be able to provide travel funding in exceptional cases for a limited number of participants.

Please state in your application if you require any of these provisions, e.g. if your institution will not cover these expenses.

 

The International Summer School is jointly organized by members of the Institute of Historical and Cultural Anthropology, the Collaborative Research Center 923 “Threatened Order – Societies under Stress”, and the Department of Sociology. It is funded by the Institutional Strategy of the University of Tübingen (ZUK 63) and the University’s Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences.

Mar
13
Wed
2019 Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Competition for Recent PhDs
Mar 13 @ 9:00 pm – 9:00 pm

ACLS invites applications for the ninth competition of the Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows program. This year, the program will place up to 21 recent PhDs from the humanities and humanistic social sciences in two-year term staff positions at partnering organizations in government and the nonprofit sector. Fellows will participate in the substantive work of these organizations and receive professional mentoring. Fellows receive a stipend of $68,000 per year and have access to individual health insurance, a relocation allowance, and up to $3,000 to be used toward professional development activities over the course of the fellowship term.

This initiative, made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to expand the role of doctoral education in the United States by demonstrating that the capacities developed in the advanced study of the humanities have wide application, both within and beyond the academy. The Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows program allows PhDs to gain career-building experience in fields such as public policy, development, conservation, arts and culture, and media.

ACLS seeks applications from recent PhDs who aspire to careers in administration, management, and public service by choice rather than circumstance. Competitive applicants will be able to demonstrate sincere interest in the field of work of their selected fellowship and will have a record of success in both academic and extra-academic endeavors.

Applicants must:

  1. have a PhD in the humanities or humanistic social sciences (see note on eligible fields below) conferred between September 1, 2015 and June 21, 2019
  2. defend and file/deposit their completed dissertations no later than April 5, 2019, and be prepared to verify this with official university documentation during the review and selection process
  3. possess US citizenship or permanent resident status

Prospective applicants should read through all the fellowship positions listed below and choose the one position that best fits their career goals. (Applicants may apply to only one position.)

The deadline for submitted applications is Wednesday, March 13, 2019, 9pm EDT.

 

FELLOWSHIP DETAILS

  • Stipend: $68,000 per year, health insurance coverage for the fellow, a relocation allowance, and up to $3,000 in professional development funds over the course of the fellowship
  • Tenure: Two years; start date on August 1 or September 3, 2019, depending on the fellowship position
  • Applications will be accepted only through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system (ofa.acls.org). Please do not contact any of the organizations directly.
  • Application deadline: March 13, 2019, 9pm EDT
  • Notification of application status will occur by email starting late-May 2019.
Mar
14
Thu
AES / ALLA / ABA Joint Spring 2019 Conference
Mar 14 – Mar 16 all-day

Conference Theme: Ethnographic Futures
Hosts: AES / ALLA / ABA
Conference Dates: March 14 to 16, 2019
Location: Washington University in St. Louis
Website: https://americanethnologist.org/meetings/spring-conference/aes-2019
CfP deadline: January 28, 2019
Registration Prices: Students $40 / $45 (member / non-member); Professional $140 / $145 (member / non-member
Travel Diversity Grant deadline & information: January 28; [email protected]

 

The AES 2019 spring conference will be co-sponsored by Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists (ALLA) and Association of Black Anthropologists (ABA). It will be held at Washington University in St Louis (MO) from Thursday, March 14th to Saturday, March 16th.

Ethnographic Futures

We are not in normal times. At least according to some. For others, the perverse assaults against bodies, land, science, and justice have merely become more visible and contestable. At a minimum, people around the world and in the United States are experiencing uncertainty, violations, and anxieties. How are anthropologists strategically positioned to reflect on and theorize this uncertainty and ab-normalcy while bringing to the foreground local articulations of hope, emancipatory politics, and meaning-making? For our Spring 2019 meeting, we invite anthropologists and other scholars and activists to join the American Ethnological Society (AES), the Association of Latina and Latino Anthropologists (ALLA), and the Association for Black Anthropologists (ABA) in St. Louis to consider possible unfoldings of the future in specific locales, worlds, and lifeways. Five years after protests in Ferguson around racialized police brutality, Ethnographic Futures will convene in nearby St. Louis to explore how people with whom we study and collaborate imagine, create, participate, and refuse. This includes possibilities for mobilizing and challenging dominant structures but also the quotidian practices of caring, laboring, and celebrating. As some blur lines between the academy and activism, while others push back on disruptions of traditional geographic and disciplinary boundaries, we invite reflections on the future and the ethnographic. Both a method of knowing and a practice of representation (texts, photography, documentaries, teaching), ethnography is itself part of and a challenge to certain futures.

Questions? Contact [email protected]

Sign up to receive conference updates via email: https://goo.gl/forms/bPG6pr7Df0o4kJSm1

Mar
15
Fri
The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019
Mar 15 all-day

The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019

Bounded languages, Unbounded

The politics of identity remain central to the mediation of language change. Here, boundaries rise and fall, thus motivating the ephemeral nature of community. The Mediterranean region is one replete with histories and power struggles, clearly demarcating nation, community, and ethnicity. Identities, language ideologies, and the languages themselves, have sought boundedness, dynamics which have indeed sought change over eons, through demographic and geographic movements, through geopolitics, through technological innovation. In a current era of technological advancement, transnational fluidity, intellectual power, capitalism, and new sexualities, we question, once again, the boundedness of language and identity, and ways in which to unbound languages and ideologies. However, mroe than before, we now increasingly require anthropological toil, so to innovative ways to locate these ideologies and their fluid boundaries, actively. We now then need to unbound these languages, and their ideologies, so to arrive at progressive realizations, and to rectify, or at least see past, the segregations of old.

The theme for the COMELA 2019,

Bounded languages, Unbounded

encapsulates an ongoing struggle throughout Mediterranean regions. The continuous tension between demarcation, yet concurrent legitimization, of languages, language ideologies, and language identities, has now entered an era where new modes of interactivity require language communities to take on roles superordinate to the past, and where flexible citizenship now operates within, and not only across, language communities.

For more information about the CFP, please visit the website.

 

Abstract and poster proposal submission

Opens: August 13, 2018 at midnight (CET Time)
Closes: January 25, 2019 at midnight (CET Time)

International Alliance for the Protection of Heritage in Conflict Areas Grants
Mar 15 all-day

The International Alliance for the Protection of Heritage in Conflict Areas (ALIPH), a new international foundation headquartered in Switzerland, has announced two categories of grants to support initiatives that address the prevention, protection and the rehabilitation of cultural heritage threatened or damaged by conflict. One category, that can be submitted at any time, is for grant requests of up to $75,000 for immediate emergency relief actions. The second category has no minimum or maximum amount but would respond to periodic calls for proposals—with the first call issued on January 15 and due March 15, 2019. ALIPH prioritizes concrete projects with direct on-the-ground impact. All organizations and communities worldwide are eligible, and the range of cultural heritage projects is expected to be broad and flexible. For online applications and information about ALIPH, see https://www.aliph-foundation.org/

CFP: Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies
Mar 15 all-day

Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies is a flightless, multi-site conference that invites interdisciplinary attention to confluences between environmental and religious perspectives and practices in the long Anglophone nineteenth century (1780-1900). The conference will be broadcast online from four participating sites:

• Armstrong Browning Library at Baylor University (Texas)
• Lancaster University (UK)
• University of Washington (Seattle)
• Georgetown University (Washington, D.C.)

This conference calls for attention both to earlier religious environmental consciousness and to the environmental impact of our scholarship today. According to TerraPass, air travel for an average international conference generates roughly 100 metric tons (mT) of carbon dioxide equivalents, the same greenhouse-gas impact as consuming 11,252 gallons of gasoline, burning 109,409 pounds of coal, or driving 245,098 miles in a passenger vehicle. In addition to avoiding air travel, we hope to lower barriers of cost and transportation, thereby enabling a more diverse and inclusive range of participation than is often possible at international conferences.

Rather than seeking to replace physical with digital networking, this conference will take a hybrid approach by linking several international sites. Events will be live-streamed on a shared conference website, where, after the conference dates, they will also be recorded for future access.

The Call for Papers is available on the Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies conference site: baylor.edu/library/ecologyreligion. I encourage you to visit the site and submit a proposal for a paper or panel session. I look forward to your submission and to our engagement with one another through this new way of conferencing.

Mar
17
Sun
Call for Information about Dissertations in German Studies
Mar 17 all-day

The German Studies Association (https://www.thegsa.org/) is continuing its tradition of posting information in the spring newsletter about dissertations completed in any area of German (that means: Austrian, German, Swiss, German diasporic) Studies (any discipline or interdisciplinary). If you received your Ph.D. in 2017 or 2018, you may be listed in the GSA’s spring 2019 newsletter (no repeats, however!). If you have supervised a dissertation that was completed in 2017 or 2018 that has not already been listed, please encourage the author to submit a description following the guidelines below.

Send an email to Janet Ward ([email protected]) anytime before March 17, 2019.

Please type “GSA dissertation list” in the subject line.

Be sure to include (in this order, please):

1. Name (Last, first)
2. Title of dissertation
3. Institution and department in which it was defended
4. Name of dissertation director(s)
5. Month and Year of Defense (or degree if no defense)
6. Abstract of the dissertation of 200 or fewer words in either English or German. (150 words is desired length, 200 words an absolute limit. Longer abstracts will be shortened)

Mar
18
Mon
Call for Papers: Perpetrating Violence
Mar 18 all-day

Violence. A Journal is launching a call for papers on the theme “Perpetrating Violence.” This special feature will be coordinated by Sabrina MELENOTTE (Violence and Exiting Violence platform).

Your article should be sent to Violence before March 18, 2019.

Violence. A Journal is also welcoming articles dealing with a wider range of topics, on the issues of violence and exiting violence. Each issue will be coordinated by its two Editors-in-Chief: Scott STRAUS (UW-Madison) and Michel WIEVIORKA (FMSH). Articles not intended to be part of a special feature can be sent to Violence anytime throughout the year.

Special Feature Theme

The special feature “Perpetrating Violence” will concentrate on acts of violence associated with collective processes, even when the action is individual. It will leave legal questions to the side.

What drives some people to commit violent acts? Conversely, why do some others, similar in all respects, not commit them? What is this liminal space that opens up between mental radicalization (this moment of the fiction of violence, of its imagination) and its enactment? Does this moment exist in all experiences? Of course, the analysis must take account of the context, according to whether it is peacetime or wartime, for example. Moreover, doesn’t there exist a switch (rapid or not, conscious or not) towards the enactment of murderous deeds?

Often inexpressible or quiet, but not necessarily so, the moment of acting violently can be rich in meanings, giving rise to many questions that this special feature is intended to explore. In acts of extreme and mass violence, the executioners’ interest is not always limited to killing the enemy, and the body can become the vehicle for messages of war. Cruelty can go from humiliation to animalization; it can be gratuitous, or it may be purposeful, turning terror and fear into methods of control and domination by killing and “re-killing” the body through postmortem mutilations. The Shoah demonstrated the heights of cruelty and sophistication that can be reached by the will to completely destroy a human group and, thus, the individuals comprising it. Collective violence, as in incidents of lynching and stoning, may arise from a runaway process in which actors use rudimentary methods that presuppose a face-to-face confrontation. Torture, systematized in certain wars (the Algerian War for example), and used by dictatorships like those of Latin America in the 1970s, transgresses the codes of war, to the detriment of civilian populations in particular. Modern communication technologies allow actors to stage their cruelty as a spectacle; for example, we see this with some Mexican drug traffickers, with ISIS, or, in France, with Mohammed Merah, responsible for a series of murders in Toulouse and Montauban in March 2012, which raises many questions about the reasons for this staging and the use of social networks.

By avoiding the twofold pitfalls of a sociologism that explains everything by collective processes and a psychologism that ignores them, it will thus serve to analyze, in a dynamic and possibly transversal manner, what connects—or fails to connect—Nazi executioners, global jihadists, Mexican drug traffickers, volunteers or conscripts in guerrillas and contemporary wars, each time they perpetrate violence. This special feature is intended to bring together all the disciplines comprising the social sciences, without exclusion; it will also welcome the words and thoughts of actors who are well placed to have observed these questions closely, for example, within NGOs.

What do we know about committing acts of violence, about individuals who perpetrate them, about the processes of subjectivation and desubjectivation that animate them, about the methods of which they make use, about the contexts that make acting violently easier or more difficult? Should the knowledge produced by research on perpetrating violence allow us to construct models, strategies, and modes of action for the prevention of extreme and mass violence, and if so, according to what criteria? This special feature will help us to better understand not only individual or collective violence, whether political, social, religious, etc., but also to better understand pre- and post-violence conditions. Is it possible to construct models, strategies, and modes of action for the prevention of extreme and mass violence, and if so, according to what criteria?

Calendar

Articles should be sent to Violence’s editorial board before March 18, 2019, if they are intended for the special feature, or for the first issue of Violence in general. Otherwise, you can submit your article(s) anytime throughout the year. You can send your article to Violence’s Managing Editor, Charlotte Groult: [email protected].

Articles should include a summary and a detailed bibliography. The editors also welcome preliminary proposals. In this case, your proposal should be sent several weeks before the deadline of March 18, 2019, if you want your article to be part of the first issue of the journal, especially its special feature. It should also be detailed enough to allow the Editorial Board to clearly understand the research materials on which the article is based, as well as the argument and the author’s intellectual approach, the principal hypotheses, the research findings, the central concepts, and the references.

If your article is accepted by the Editorial Board, it will then be sent out for peer review by the journal. Each article should be between 6,000 and 8,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography).

The author should make a special effort to use a writing style that will make the article easily understandable to the educated layperson and not merely to academic circles. Violence. A Journal has the ambition to reach a wider readership than an academic journal, especially the “actors” involved in preventing and exiting violence: NGOs, associations, politics, legal experts, and civil society.

Violence will be published both in print and online and will be available entirely in English. However, you can also write your article in French; Violence. A Journal will take care of the translation.

CEPID Center for the Study of Violence Post-doctoral Fellowships
Mar 18 all-day

CEPID Center for the Study of Violence Post-doctoral fellowships opportunities

Program: Building Democracy Daily: human rights, violence and institutional trust (CEPID-FAPESP).

The Center for the Study of Violence of the University of São Paulo is selecting eight post-doctoral fellows to develop research projects in the referred program, with duration of at least one year, with the possibility of renewal, and planned to begin in May 2019.

The objective of the research program is to analyze how the legitimacy of key institutions for democracy is constructed or jeopardized, by exploring the contacts between citizens and civil servants from local public services in representative areas of the city of São Paulo.

The post-doctoral (PD) fellows are expected to lead theoretical and empirical research in the program, aside from other regular activities such as organizing seminars, preparing papers, supervising undergraduate students, disseminating research results and cooperating with the educational projects.

Find below the list of research topics for the proposals

Topic 1: Legitimacy, violence, punishment and democracy
1.1. Legitimacy from the perspective of citizens
1.2. Relationships of authority in police organizations and courts
1.3. Legal socialization of adolescents
1.4. Cities, organized crime and prisons

Topic 2: Methodological studies focused on legitimacy, youth, violence and cities
2.1. Longitudinal studies
2.2. Research from Big Data
2.3. Public opinion, discourses and social representations

Topic 3: Project Human Rights Observatories in Schools (PODHE)

Application deadline: March 18, 2019.

For further information on the specific research themes and requirements for application, please visit: http://english.nevusp.org/blog/2019/01/29/call-post-doc-fellowship/