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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Apr
30
Mon
M. Estellie Smith Memorial Fund Dissertation Award
Apr 30 all-day

M. Estellie Smith Memorial Fund
Dissertation Award
Call for Proposals

 

The M. Estellie Smith Memorial Fund honors Dr. Smith’s vibrant personality and her dedication to scholarship, mentorship, and the application of social science knowledge to real world issues.  During her long career as an anthropologist, Estellie followed her intellectual curiosity through diverse subjects including Pueblo Indians, European societies, societal evolution, maritime anthropology, linguistics, and Portuguese communities.  A past president of SEA, Estellie is fondly remembered for her generous attention to students, to whom she provided critical and helpful advice.

To celebrate Estellie’s spirit of mentorship and concern for pressing world issues, the M. Estellie Smith Memorial Fund provides graduate student awardees small grants specifically to supplement dissertation fieldwork expenses (typically, $2000) and subsequent travel money to present their findings at the Society for Economic Anthropology annual conference (typically, $500).

Applicants must demonstrate how their research will address the field of economic anthropology as well as significant and pressing world issues, offering potential theoretical or applied advances that could make the world a better place particularly for vulnerable peoples.

 

ELIGIBILITY

  1. Any student enrolled in an anthropology (or allied field) doctoral program, regardless of citizenship or nation, is eligible for the award.
  2. Funds must be spent on travel, field, or lab expenses directly related to the student’s dissertation, as approved by their academic advisor and committee, and all applicants must be ABD by the time the research would be conducted. Status and eligibility should be reflected in letters of recommendation.
  3. The funds are not intended for predissertation fieldwork or language study.

 

APPLICATION AND DEADLINE                                                                                                  

Applicants who meet the eligibility requirements may apply for the award by providing the following materials prior to the deadline listed below. All materials should be submitted via email to [email protected] by April 30, 2018.   Awards are will be announced in June.

  1. Proposal Cover sheet – template available on SEA website under AWARDS
  2. Abstract (100 words)
  3. Project description, 500 words or less about research goals, itinerary, primary research tasks, potential outcomes
  4. 300 word discussion of how the research will address significant and pressing world issues, offering potential theoretical or applied advances in economic anthropology that could make the world a better place particularly for vulnerable peoples.
  5. Curriculum Vitae
  6. Letter of recommendation (included or under separate cover)
  7. Budget description, including detailed description of what this $2000 award will pay for; other sources of funding that the student has applied for, plans to apply for, or has received; and how remaining expenses will be covered.
  8. Before funds will be disbursed, the applicant must provide official documentation from their department of A.B.D. status (candidacy).

 

THE AWARD

  • Recipients receive $2,000 for PhD research, issued upon acceptance of the award and notification to the Treasurer of the SEA.
  • Recipients receive a one-year membership in the Society for Economic Anthropology (for those already members of the American Anthropological Association).
  • Recipients receive $500 to supplement the costs of traveling to the SEA spring conference during the year following the research award to present a poster or paper on the dissertation research or background work

May
1
Tue
Call for Applications: 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards
May 1 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: IVAN KARP DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARDS FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SOUTH AFRICAN PhD PROGRAMMES

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

 

The African Critical Inquiry Programme is pleased to announce the 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards to support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled at South African universities and conducting dissertation research on relevant topics. Grant amounts vary depending on research plans, with a maximum award of ZAR 40,000.

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ELIGIBILITY: The Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards are open to African postgraduate students (regardless of citizenship) in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Applicants must be currently registered in a PhD programme in a

South African university and be working on topics related to ACIP’s focus. Awards will support doctoral research projects focused on topics such as institutions of public culture, particular aspects of museums and exhibitions, forms and practices of public scholarship, culture and communication, and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship.

Applicants must submit a dissertation proposal that has been approved by their institution to confirm the award; this must be completed before they begin ACIP- supported on-site research or by December 2018, whichever comes first.

APPLICATION PROCESS: Awards are open to proposals working with a range of methodologies in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, including research in archives and collections, fieldwork, interviews, surveys, and quantitative data collection. Applicants are expected to write in clear, intelligible prose for a selection committee that is multi-disciplinary and cross-regional. Proposals should show thorough knowledge of the major concepts, theories, and methods in the applicant’s discipline and in other related fields and include a bibliography relevant to the research. Applicants should specify why an extended period of on-site research is essential to successfully complete the proposed doctoral dissertation. Guidance and advice on how to write a good proposal and budget can be found in the Resources section of the ACIP website (http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html) or here: http://www.ssrc.org/publications/view/the-art-of-writing-proposals/.

To apply, eligible applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (form below and online at  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  • abstract of the proposed research project (250 words maximum)
  •  research proposal outlining the project’s goals, central questions, significance, and relevance for ACIP’s central concerns. Proposals should include a clearly formulated, realistic research design and plan of work responsive to the project’s theoretical and methodological concerns. Applicants should provide evidence of appropriate training to undertake the proposed research, including the language fluency necessary for the project. Proposals should be no longer than 5 pages; they should be double spaced, with one inch margins and a font no smaller than 11 point. Applications that do not follow this format will not be considered.
  • bibliography of up to two additional pages
  • project budget listing and justifying project expenses to be supported by the award
  • your curriculum vitae
  • current transcript
  • two referee letters; one of these must be from your supervisor. Your referees should comment specifically on your proposed project, its quality and significance, and your qualifications for undertaking it. They might also evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of your project and how you and your work would benefit from receiving the research award. Referee letters should be submitted directly to the selection committee.

 

Funding is to be used for on-site dissertation research; research cannot be at the applicant’s home institution unless that institution has necessary site-specific research holdings not otherwise available to the applicant. Applicants who have completed significant funded dissertation research by the start of their proposed ACIP research may be ineligible to apply to extend research time. Eligibility will be at the discretion of the ACIP Selection Committee, depending on completed research time and funding. Please note that the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards support dissertation research only and may not be used for dissertation write-up, tuition, study at other universities, conference participation, or to reimburse debts or expenses for research already completed. The programme does not accept applications from PhD programmes in Law, Business, Medicine, Nursing, or Journalism, nor does it accept applications in doctoral programmes that do not lead to a PhD.

SELECTION PROCESS: Applications will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee, an interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners drawn from a range of universities and cultural institutions. Selection will be based on the merit and strength of the application. Award amounts will vary according to project needs; the maximum award is ZAR 40,000. Awards will be made only if applications of high quality are received.

Notification of awards will be made by late July.

Successful applicants will be required to attend the African Critical Inquiry Workshop in the following year and will have opportunities to consult with scholars associated with the Workshop. They will be expected to attend subsequent ACIP Workshops while completing their dissertations, if possible. After completing their research, applicants must submit a final research report and a financial report.

Students who receive an Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award from the African Critical Inquiry Programme must acknowledge the support in any publications resulting from the research and in their dissertation. When the dissertation is completed, they must deposit a copy with the African Critical Inquiry Programme at the Center for Humanities Research.

 

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received on or before Tuesday 1 May 2018. Incomplete applications and applications that do not conform to format guidelines will not be considered.

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2018 Research Award Application” to  [email protected]

 

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund  
http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html
 https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

Call for Proposals: African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshops
May 1 all-day
CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO ORGANIZE A WORKSHOP

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organize a workshop to take place in 2019. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular questions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, or representational or institutional forms from diverse methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that bring into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energize conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organizations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organizations, NGOs or others appropriate to the topic.

Abstracts for previously funded ACIP Workshops are available here.

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2019.
  •  a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  • a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  •  a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organizers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape for basic financial administration and are responsible for complying with CHR policies. Workshop organizers should submit a letter from the host institution, centre, programme, or department confirming that appropriate administrative and institutional support will be available.

We ask Workshop organizers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organizers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organizations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches or specializations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply:

Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  •  abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement defining the proposed Workshop theme and focus, its significance, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organizing the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organizer)
  • an institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop. Please describe available administrative and logistical support in this letter and/or your work plan
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organization, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

Conceptualization: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross- institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed Workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

Workshop organizer(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organizing the Workshop, including previous administration/organization and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

Applicants who organize an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research.

After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Tuesday 1 May 2018. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

 

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2019 Workshop Proposal” to [email protected]

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund
http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html
 https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

LOVA International Summer School 2018
May 1 all-day

LOVA International Summer School 2018 ‘Unschooling the Anthropologist’

2-6 July, Amsterdam

LOVA`s International Summer School is back with a 6th edition! The theme of LOVA ISS 2018 is ‘Unschooling the Anthropologist’.

Unschooling is seen as a philosophy or educational attitude that promotes self-directed learning, as well as the acquiring of skills, knowledge and wisdom through natural life experiences, honest, meaningful dialogues and curiosity. This Summer School is focused on helping participants to fundamentally empty themselves from acquired constructs and concepts, in order to be open to the world as it enfolds around us. This practice of ‘unschooling’ can be very helpful for researchers, and particularly anthropologists.

Jiddu Krishnamurti: I hope that you will listen, but not with the memory of what you already know; and this is very difficult to do. You listen to something, and your mind immediately reacts with its knowledge, its conclusions, its opinions, its past memories. It listens, inquiring for a future understanding. Just observe yourself, how you are listening, and you will see that this is what is taking place. Either you are listening with a conclusion, with knowledge, with certain memories, experiences, or you want an answer, and you are impatient. You want to know what it is all about, what life is all about, the extraordinary complexity of life. You are not actually listening at all.

Through self-research, interactive workshops and inspiring lectures, LOVA creates a platform for participants to critically and playfully examine their held beliefs and attitudes towards several broad themes that commonly arise in the work of anthropologists, including ‘education’, ‘gender and sexuality’, ‘development work’ and ‘stress and (mental) health’. There will also be several excursions to stimulate the mind and body, and an exceptionally enjoyable encounter with the history and culture of Amsterdam.

Feedback from past years has been very positive and underlines the pleasure of intensively working and developing new ideas in a small group. The LOVA ISS is designed for students (BA, MA and PhD) and lifelong learners, and combines academic learning with body exercises and good food. Our maxim is to work with anti-hierarchical structures and we invite newly graduated students to teach next to professors. Lastly we provide information about ethnographic ‘tools’ within the parameters of gender and feminist anthropology. Our summer school gives the opportunity to submerge oneself in the methods and conduct of ethnographic field research through interactive didactic methods.

The (preliminary) programme:

Please note that the programme is subject to change. The names of the speakers will be announced as soon as confirmed.

Some of the topics of this year’s lectures, workshops and excursions are:

Lectures:

  • Rethinking education: reimagining industrialized universities and understanding learning in the face of wellbeing.
  • Rethinking gender and sexuality: What does it mean to be of a particular gender?
  • Digital peer cultures and self-presentations: a feminist perspective.
  • Rethinking development aid: (sexual) education and the ‘other’.
  • Rethinking health; posing critical questions regarding current paradigms on health and the body.

Workshops:

  • Theater or life? Learning public ethnographical methods based on theater dialogues
  • Stress Management: journeying through your own mental constitution
  • The gendered body: exploring the (natural) construction of binary sexed identities through dance and movement.
  • The virtue of selfishness: unschooling morality and altruism
  • Nonviolent Communication

Excursion:

  • Gendered tour through the Rijksmuseum by Carola Lammers (Anthropologist & guide).

The venue

The workshops and lectures will be provided at different locations (more information regarding the actual location per date will be given later). The following venues are included:

CEDLA: The Center for Latin American Research and Documentation is located in the Eastern part of  the city center of Amsterdam, at the Weesperplein area. This inspiring research center will be our host for one of the five days.

Cultural Melting Pot Café OKO: located in the West of Amsterdam, this art gallery, workshop space and vegan café offers an ideal setting for our Summer School program. We will be here for two of the five days.

Nelson Mandela House: this beautiful inn, located in the North of Amsterdam, alongside the river IJ, Is dedicated to celebrating and restoring interconnection, based on the Ubunti-philosophy. We will be using their beautiful workshop space for two of the days.

Practical matters

Requirements

  • BA, MA or PhD student (or lifelong learner with an affinity with gender studies)
  • Academic English proficiency.

Application
We would like to receive a short letter (maximum half a page) stating your motivation to participate. We will inform you about your acceptance in due time. Upon receipt of the acceptance letter please proceed with the payment of the tuition fee and you will receive a letter of confirmation and updates about the summer school program. For any questions don’t hesitate to contact us!

Deadline for application: 1 May 2018

Tuition fee

€350,-

The tuition fee includes:

  • All lectures, workshops and excursions mentioned in the program
  • Bike-rental (5 days)
  • Breakfast & lunches (5 days)
  • Coffee, tea, refreshments (5 days)

The program fee excludes accommodation. We encourage students to book their accommodation in time as Amsterdam is rather popular during the summer. For suggestions regarding stay, please contact us (we will inform you about possible solutions, including camping or hostels).

Schedule

The daily schedule runs from 9.00/10.00 – 17.30/18.00. We guarantee small groups. In previous editions there were participants from around the world. Courses and workshops are taught in English. Please note to bring comfortable shoes for the excursions as well as strolls around the city.

The complete programme will be available as soon as possible. We look forward to receive your application and to answer any questions that you might have! Please send your message to: [email protected]

You can read updates about the Summer School at our website: www.lova.network/summer-school/

2018 Call for Submissions: Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing
May 1 all-day

2018 Call for Submissions: Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing

 The Society for Humanistic Anthropology (SHA) announces the annual juried competition for the Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing. The late Victor Turner devoted his career to seeking an accessible language that would reopen anthropology to the human subject, and the competition recognizes the innovative books that further this project.

AWARD
A $1,000 first-place, a $500 second place and a $250 third-place prize will be awarded at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose, California, November 14-18, 2018.

ELIGIBILITY
Eligible genres include single and co-authored ethnographic monographs, narratives, historical accounts, biographies, memoirs, dramas, or single-authored collections of essays, short stories, or poems. Book publication year must be no earlier than 2016. Books may be entered into the competition by authors, publishers, book editors, or colleagues. No formal letter of nomination is needed. Books published in 2016-2017 entered in last year’s competition may be resubmitted this year with the appropriate entry fee.
SUBMISSION: FEE
For authors who are already SHA members, the entry fee is $25/book. For authors who are not SHA members, the entry fee is $75/book. (Publishers: for all books you submit, please check with authors first to discover whether they are current SHA members and please encourage authors to join SHA). The fee may be paid either online here (log into Anthro Gateway to get the SHA member rate of $25), or by check (made out to the American Anthropological Association) with the Submission-Fee-Form sent to:

Kathy Ano, Controller
American Anthropological Association 2300 Clarendon Blvd, Suite 1301
Arlington, VA 22201-3386
Phone: 703.528.1902 ext. 1161
Fax: 703.528.3546

SUBMISSION: BOOKS (a total of 3 copies)Send one copy of the book to be entered to each of the three judges:

Victor Turner Prize, c/o Anna Tsing
Department of Anthropology Aarhus University Moesgaard Alle 20
8270 Hojbjerg Denmark

Victor Turner Prize, c/o Helena Wulff Stockholm University
Department of Social Anthropology SE-10691 Stockholm
Sweden

Victor Turner Prize, c/o Julia Offen 1986 Paquita Dr.
Carpinteria, CA 93013 U.S.A.

 

SUBMISSION: COVER LETTER

All submitters to the contest must also send a cover letter to [email protected] with the following four items of required information:

  1. book title, publication year, and publisher;
  2. author’s contact information including mailing address, all telephone numbers and e-mail address;
  3. author’s biographical sketch (1-2 paragraphs) including highest degree awarded, discipline, and institution;
  4. current affiliation (university or otherwise).

Biographical information will be used for presenting the winners and publicizing the results of the competition and will not be used for judging the quality of the entries. Entrants may also include an optional short statement about intellectual training/ orientation, and the circumstances surrounding the research/ writing of the book.

The deadline for receipt of all required materials is May 1, 2018.

All inquiries should be directed to Dr. Julia Offen, prize coordinator, at [email protected]

African Critical Inquiry Programme Call for Proposals to Organize a Workshop
May 1 all-day

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organize a workshop to take place in 2019. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa.

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular notions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational or institutional forms from methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that brings into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organizations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches or specializations to the proposed Workshop theme.

For full information about this opportunity and how to apply, see the full Call for Proposals listed under “ACIP Opportunities” on our website: http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html.

Call for Applications: African Critical Inquiry Programme Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards
May 1 all-day

FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SOUTH AFRICAN PhD PROGRAMS

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

The African Critical Inquiry Programme is pleased to announce the 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards to support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled at South African universities and conducting dissertation research on relevant topics. Grant amounts vary depending on research plans, with a maximum award of ZAR 40,000.

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards are open to African postgraduate students (regardless of citizenship) in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Applicants must be currently registered in a PhD programme in a South African university and be working on topics related to ACIP’s focus. Awards will support doctoral research projects focused on topics such as institutions of public culture, particular aspects of museums and exhibitions, forms and practices of public scholarship, culture and communication, and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Awards are open to proposals working with a range of methodologies in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, including research in archives and collections, fieldwork, interviews, surveys, and quantitative data collection.

For full information about this opportunity and how to apply, see the full Call for Proposals listed under “ACIP Opportunities” on our website: http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html.

Center for Communal Studies Research Travel Grant
May 1 all-day

Center for Communal Studies
University of Southern Indiana

 

Research Travel Grant

The Center for Communal Studies at the University of Southern Indiana annually invites applications for a Research Travel Grant to fund research at the Communal Studies Collection at USI’s David L. Rice Library. The Communal Studies Collection’s rich archival materials hold information on over 600 historic and contemporary communal societies, utopias and intentional communities. A complete listing of communities can be found on the Rice Library website. Strengths include materials on the Harmonists and Owenites who settled nearby New Harmony, Indiana, but the breadth of the collections covers American communalism more broadly. Applicants may be graduate students or established scholars in the United States or abroad from any discipline that involves the study of communalism (such as history, English, anthropology, economics, sociology, etc.). The grant will fund research up to $2,000 to be used by June 30 of the subsequent year. All applications must include a letter detailing the project and its significance to communal studies, a proposed budget and a vita. Applications are due annually by 1 May. The winner of this Research Travel Grant is announced annually in June 2018.

Please send materials as email attachments to Casey Harison at [email protected].

NSF Dear Colleague Letter Navigating the New Arctic
May 1 all-day

This Dear Colleague Letter (DCL) invites proposals in FY 2018 that will advance NNA research through convergent approaches to emerging scientific, engineering, societal, and education challenges, and builds upon the NNA awards resulting from the FY 2017 DCL on Growing Convergence Research at NSF. A systems-based approach is strongly encouraged, including research that both contributes to, and leverages, large data sets from enhanced observational technology and networks. Knowledge co-production with local and indigenous communities, advancing public participation in research, and international partnerships are also strongly encouraged as possible means to achieve NNA objectives.

In particular, NSF draws attention to the Arctic Sciences Section, which can accept NNA relevant proposals in its Arctic Natural Sciences, Arctic Social Sciences, Arctic System Science, and Arctic Observing Network programs. The section has no proposal deadlines, which allows NSF to accept any NNA relevant proposal and coordinate its co-review and funding across the agency. This is not a special competition or a new program; proposals in response to this DCL must meet the requirements and deadlines of the program to which they are submitted. Organizations submitting proposals to programs and funding vehicles without deadlines are encouraged to submit proposals by May 1, 2018, to be considered for FY 2018 funding. Proposals for Research Coordination Networks (RCNs) that will serve to identify NNA questions that require convergent integration across disciplines, as well as conference proposals and proposals for EArly-Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER), should be submitted to the Arctic System Science program which will coordinate with other NSF programs for their review and funding. In order to highlight NNA focus, proposal titles should be prefaced with “NNA:”.

May
3
Thu
Arctic Explorer Symposium at the Embassy of Canada
May 3 @ 4:30 pm – 8:30 pm