Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Oct
15
Tue
CFP: Just Code: Power, Inequality, and the Global Political Economy of IT
Oct 15 all-day

Just Code: Power, Inequality, and the Global Political Economy of IT

Just Code is a one and a half day CBI symposium/workshop on how code—construed broadly, from software routines to bodies of law and policy—structures and reinforces power relations. It will explore the often invisible ways that individuals and institutions use software, algorithms, and computerized systems to establish, legitimize, and reinforce widespread social, material, commercial, and cultural inequalities and power imbalances. The event will also examine how individuals, unions, political organizations, and other institutions use code to fight for equality and justice. Other major themes include the (pre-)history of code/algorithmic thinking; code as means of concealment or secret communications; codes of conduct in business, governance, and culture related to IT and its institutions (local and global exploitation through imperialism, human rights violations, and environmental degradation); and codes of ethics in information technology. The papers will draw from across the humanities and qualitative social sciences, including disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, science and technology studies, geography, and communications. We anticipate that papers (collectively) will examine a wide range of themes in the global business, cultural, social, legal, and environmental history of the political economy of information technology. Papers will be pre-circulated (among presenters) and we have plans to publish revised papers (after editorial and peer review) as an edited volume in the Springer History of Computing Book Series.

 

Submission and Dates

Proposals should include a two-page curriculum vitae and a 300 to 450 word abstract (as a single PDF) that highlights the key argument(s), connection of the paper to the symposium’s topic/themes, and a description of core methods/sources.  This should be sent to cbi at umn.edu (please have your last name in the file name and use the subject line “Just Code Symposium Proposal”).

Deadline for Paper Proposals is Oct. 15, 2019 (notifications will be made within 30 days)

Deadline for Submission of Papers (for those offered and accepting a place on the program) is March 31, 2020 (papers will only be pre-circulated to fellow presenters/panelists on the program, not to all registrants).

Those offered and accepting a spot on the program will have to commit to participating in the entire workshop, revising their work based on feedback from peers at the event and the organizers/editors, and submitting it for consideration to the planned edited volume.

For those offered and accepting a place on the symposium’s program (presenters/panelists), CBI will cover the cost of 2 nights lodging at a nearby hotel (walking distance to CBI), lunch, and an event dinner. Early career presenters on the program (graduate students, postdocs, and junior faculty) can apply for CBI travel grants of $300 to partially offset their travel costs (done as a reimbursement/partial reimbursement). Please indicate if you would like to be considered for one of these travel grants at the bottom of your abstract.  The program will commence at 8:30 AM on Friday May 8 and conclude at 12:30 PM on Saturday May 9. Registration is automatic for everyone on the program.

For those wanting to attend who are not presenting, the symposium’s registration is free and open to CBI Friends (and those who become CBI Friends), and to students, academic staff, and faculty of the Univ. of Minnesota.  Lunch is provided for all who register. The event dinner is only for those on the program. Information on becoming a CBI Friend is at http://www.cbi.umn.edu/about/friends.html

Registration form for those attending but not presenting. The size will be capped, so we encourage registering far in advance. https://forms.gle/KK5n37jhN1Mdnyxp9

The event will be at CBI–Andersen Library at the University of Minnesota

Oct
16
Wed
2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Oct 16 – Oct 19 all-day

The 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society  

October 16-19, 2019 • Hyatt Regency Baltimore Inner Harbor • Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Community-Driven

You can’t stop the people of Baltimore, Maryland, from expressing the enduring traditions that define this City of Neighborhoods, where community-based efforts drive culture, spark change, and sustain place-making. Come to Baltimore and experience what it means to be community driven in a city that illuminates the diverse geographies and peoples of Maryland and the surrounding region—urban, rural, Appalachian, and estuarine.

This meeting will explore what it means for the folklore world to be of, by and for the people—community driven. We invite participants to reveal how communities use the tools of folklore to build partnerships, foster innovation and sustainability, respond to injustice, and create conditions for reconciliation in a time of division and distraction; to explore community-driven curation and preservation in a digitally connected world; and to participate in discussions on building capacity to help folklorists better serve the communities with whom they work. Equally, we invite reflections on folklore as an instrument for constructing and shaping communities themselves, recognizing that this is not always a benevolent process for either insiders or outsiders.

In focusing on what is community driven, we also draw attention to:

  • Partnerships
  • Local responses and resistance
  • Work fostering new connections
  • Grassroots curations of action and sustainability
  • The role of cultural workers in sustaining communities and expressive life
  • The value of (and definitions of) community in times of division
  • Folk and vernacular culture in a digitally connected world
  • Community resilience and solidarity on the front lines of climate change

The Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen relationships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required. We especially welcome proposals for creative presentations in any format that are populated robustly by community members telling their own stories in their own words. Contact [email protected] to discuss alternative presentation formats.

You can find more information about the meeting, including the full theme statement, instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2019AM.

Proposals may be submitted February 15–March 31, 2019.

Nov
1
Fri
2020-2021 Institute for Advanced Study Fellowships
Nov 1 all-day

Each year, the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, NJ, invites around 25 scholars to be in residence for the full academic year to pursue their own research. The School welcomes applications in economics, political science, law, psychology, sociology and anthropology. It encourages social scientific work with an historical and humanistic bent and also entertains applications in history, philosophy, literary criticism, literature and linguistics. Applicants must have a Ph.D. at time of application. Each year there is a general thematic focus that provides common ground for roughly half the scholars; for 2020-2021 the focus will be “Science and the State.” The application deadline is November 1, 2019. Applications must be submitted through the Institute’s online application system, which opens June 1 and can be found, along with more information about the theme, at www.sss.ias.edu/applications.

Modern science and the modern state are inextricable and co-emergent. Indeed, the rise of the state form has been accomplished through the ways of knowing and extracting that scientific analysis makes possible—including classification, hierarchization, quantification, and reductionism. But while the production of science and the formation of the state are relatively well studied, much remains to be understood about the relationships between the two—how states support, use, and regulate sciences, and how the sciences support the structure, function, and legitimacy of states.

What have been the historical processes involved in the intertwined development of states and sciences, and how much have they varied across national contexts? While the state remains the driver of both private and public sector technoscience in certain societies, what has its role become in many others, where scientific innovation is increasingly seen as the purview of the private sector? As we today face issues and crises, from human gene-editing to climate change, that supersede provincial  boundaries—even  as  forms  of  violence and social control enabled by science continue to be operationalized by nation-states— what forms of transnational oversight may be required? How might state engagement with the natural and social sciences, such as the use of “nudge units” and “evidence- based” claims in legislation and governance, necessitate new understandings of the relationship between states and sciences? How does the corporate world respond to increasing demands  from both the state and citizens for social responsibility and ethical practice with regard to science and technology? These are some  of  the  questions  that will be addressed by the various disciplines of the social sciences and humanities.

Applications from scholars working outside the theme are also encouraged.

The program will be led by

Alondra Nelson, Harold F. Linder Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in collaboration with

Didier Fassin, James D. Wolfensohn Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study

Nov
7
Thu
Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting @ Bloomington, Indiana
Nov 7 – Nov 10 all-day

Society for Ethnomusicology 2019 Annual Meeting – Bloomington, IN, Nov 7-10, 2019

The Society for Ethnomusicology will hold its 64th Annual Meeting on November 7-10, 2019, at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. The meeting will be hosted by Indiana University in conjunction with the IU Bicentennial (1820-2020). For the Call for Proposals, abstract submission instructions, and preliminary meeting information, please visit the SEM 2019 area of the SEM website (www.ethnomusicology.org).

In conjunction with the SEM Annual Meeting, two concurrent pre-conference symposia will be presented on November 6: “Film as Ethnography, Activism, and Public Work in Ethnomusicology” and “Heritage and the Politics of Inclusion in Latin American Brass Bands.”

Visit the conference website for more information about the Annual Meeting, pre-conference symposia, online registration, and hotel accommodations.

Nov
20
Wed
2019 AAA/CASCA Annual Meeting @ Vancouver Convention Center
Nov 20 – Nov 24 all-day

Changing Climates: Struggle, Collaboration, and Justice//Changer d’air : Lutte, collaboration et justice

We are thrilled to announce the theme of the joint AAA/CASCA 2019 Meeting to be held in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Changing Climates: Struggle, Collaboration, and Justice / Changer d’air: Lutte, collaboration et justice. This theme was developed through a collaborative effort by the Executive Program Committee, which includes members of both CASCA and the AAA.

 

ENGLISH VERSION

“Changing Climates / Changer d’air”: AAA and CASCA are collaborating for the first time to host the 2019 Annual Meeting in Vancouver, British Columbia. The Executive Program Committee invites anthropologists and their collaborators to examine how we engage with communities around issues of change over time, including climate change, to envision and build a more equitable future. In this sense, “climates” signals the contexts in which we work: environmental, social, and political climates, as well as climates for research, for inclusion and equity, and for teaching. “Climates” also points to anthropology’s holistic approach, which connects systemic elements and can illuminate shifting relationships, conflicts, and opportunities.

“Struggle, Collaboration, and Justice” reflect the context, dynamic, and outcomes that we seek through our work. We call for a reflection on “Struggle,” acknowledging the complex nature of change, which often includes challenges, conflicts, and misunderstandings, as well as different forms of resistance and resilience. Struggle can also be romanticized even as it re-entrenches power. We must acknowledge these facets of our work to note sources and productive outcomes of tension.

“Collaboration” highlights how anthropologists engage with various communities, from local to global, to construct research questions, design approaches, and make recommendations. Anthropology’s focus on local experience and perspectives provides us with a set of theoretical and methodological tools for building relationships with communities—relationships that can evolve into genuine coproduction of new knowledge. This is a call to bring your collaborators into conversation at the Annual Meeting about how these relationships develop and change over time. Collaborators could be those you learn from, the people who conduct research with you, or the people who learn from you. For those without collaborators, this will be an opportunity to envision developing relationships that are built on reciprocity, trust, and deep collaboration.

And finally, we call for a reflection on “Justice” to highlight the potential for these collaborations to contribute to reconciliation, self-determination, decolonization, redistribution as well as other ways of addressing power inequalities. Anthropology’s commitment to long-term research and integrative theory and methods provides a unique perspective on how prehistoric, historical, and current events contribute to ongoing inequalities and subjugation, as well as how to design collaborative projects that have the potential to generate more just opportunities that matter in practice.

Since we are convening in Vancouver, on unceded lands of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations, we want to offer opportunities to highlight how anthropology connects to Indigenous communities through active collaborations as well as struggles to deal with anthropology’s implications in ongoing coloniality.

VERSION FRANÇAISE

« Changer d’air / Changing Climates » : Pour la première fois en 2019, la American Anthropological Association (AAA) et la Société canadienne d’anthropologie (CASCA) collaborent en vue de tenir un congrès conjoint à Vancouver, en Colombie-Britannique. Le comité directeur du programme invite les anthropologues et leurs collaborateurs à examiner notre façon de travailler avec les communautés aux prises avec des enjeux relatifs au changement d’ère, notamment en lien avec les changements climatiques, afin de concevoir et de construire un avenir plus équitable. En ce sens, la partie principale du thème, « changer d’air », renvoie aux changements touchant les contextes dans lesquels nous travaillons—qu’ils soient environnementaux, sociaux et politiques—ainsi qu’à ceux touchant les milieux de la recherche et de l’enseignement, mais également les espaces d’inclusion et d’équité. Cette composante du thème renvoie aussi à l’approche holiste en anthropologie, qui permet de mettre en lumière les relations en mutation entre les divers éléments de ces contextes, ainsi que les conflits et les possibilités qu’elles sous-tendent.

La composante « Lutte, collaboration et justice » reflète le milieu, la dynamique et les résultats que nous visons à travers nos travaux. Nous invitons à réfléchir à la « lutte », conscients de la nature complexe du changement qui sous-tend souvent des défis, des conflits, des malentendus ainsi que différentes formes de résistance et de résilience. La lutte peut aussi être idéalisée alors même qu’elle participe à réaffirmer les relations de pouvoir existantes. Voilà des facettes de notre travail à considérer pour repérer les sources, mais également les résultats productifs des tensions.

« Collaboration » souligne la façon dont les anthropologues s’engagent auprès de diverses communautés, tant sur les plans locaux qu’internationaux, afin d’élaborer les questions de recherche, de concevoir les approches et de formuler des recommandations. Les expériences et perspectives locales au cœur de la démarche anthropologique nous fournissent un ensemble d’outils théoriques et méthodologiques utiles pour nouer des liens avec les communautés, lesquels peuvent déboucher sur une véritable coproduction de nouvelles connaissances. Vous êtes invités à convier vos collaborateurs à participer, lors du congrès, à la discussion sur la façon dont ces relations se développent et évoluent. Les collaborateurs peuvent être les personnes auprès desquelles vous apprenez, celles avec qui vous menez vos travaux de recherche ou celles qui apprennent de vous. Les participants et participantes qui n’ont pas de collaborateurs pourront profiter de l’occasion pour songer à établir des liens reposant sur la réciprocité, la confiance et une collaboration féconde.

Enfin, nous vous invitons à réfléchir à la « justice » afin de mettre en relief comment ces collaborations peuvent contribuer à la réconciliation, à l’autodétermination, à la décolonisation, à la redistribution ainsi qu’à d’autres moyens de corriger les inégalités de pouvoir. De par son engagement envers la recherche à long terme ainsi qu’envers la théorie et les méthodes intégratives, l’anthropologie offre une perspective unique sur la façon dont les événements préhistoriques, historiques et actuels participent aux asservissements et aux inégalités toujours existants, ainsi que sur la manière de concevoir des projets de collaboration susceptibles d’engendrer des possibilités plus justes qui seront en mesure de faire la différence.

Comme nous nous réunirons à Vancouver, sur les terres non cédées des Premières Nations Musqueam, Squamish et Tsleil-Waututh, nous voulons que cet événement offre des occasions de souligner les liens entre l’anthropologie et les communautés autochtones. Ces liens se nouent et se renforcent tant dans la collaboration active que dans les luttes pour faire face aux implications de la discipline anthropologique dans la colonialité, une réalité toujours d’actualité.