Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jan
23
Wed
The CALA (2019) Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology
Jan 23 – Jan 26 all-day

Following continuous requests for a Second Call, the CALA, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, to be held in Siem Reap Cambodia, January 23-26, 2019, is now extremely pleased to announce its Second Call.

Despite that the call has been given a deadline, it may close early, should a ceiling be placed on the submission numbers, as we have already received an abundance of submissions, over 400 in the first call. Submissions have until now been high, so please excuse delays in responding to any queries.

Full Title: Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 1

Short Title: CALA 1 (2019)

Location:
Siem Reap, Cambodia

Start Date:
23-Jan-2019 – 26-Jan-2019

Contact: Professor Susan Hagadorn

Meeting Email: [email protected]

Meeting URL: http://cala2019.puc.edu.kh

Meeting Description: 

The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, The CALA 1 (2019), in Cambodia, symbolizes a significant movement forward for Linguistic Anthropology, and in problematizing current perspectives and praxis in the field of Asian Linguistic Anthropology.

The CALA seeks to respond to concerns by those within respective fields, Linguistics, Anthropology, Sociolinguistics, Sociology, Cultural studies, and of course Linguistic Anthropology These concerns include the reduced (opportunity for) focus on Asian regions and work by Asian academics, largely contributable to issues of funding and expertise. These concerns also include that academics globally seek to both work on Asian regions and with Asian regions, but impeded by the absence of appropriate networks.

The CALA 1 thus aims to begin an era within which to opportune these academics to transfer knowledge, expertise, and valuable Linguistic and Anthropological Data across the world, through the interpersonal and inter-institutional networks the CALA conferences seek to build.

To ground these efforts, the Conference, at The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia at the centre, seeks to network a growing number of Institutions globally, to support this much needed project.

The theme for the inaugural CALA is ‘Revitalization and Representation‘, a theme pertinent to the current state of many Asian regions and countries vis-a-vis their global analogues.

Emerging from a complex weaving for received and produced colonializations, the languages and ethnicities within Asia have experienced strong curtailment and denigration, to the point where many have reached near extinction, while others have passed the point of extinction. Here, these languages and ethnicities require urgent revitalization through an anthropological set of approaches, in collaboration with academic, and non-academic, networks globally. Revitalization can be engendered effectively through the complex channels associated with and effected through the extensive and vast work developed in Representation. Cambodia seems to be at the centre of this need for focus, with many ethnicities and their languages currently on the brink of extinction, and with several now having less than ten living speakers.

Though The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia will host the Inaugural conference in 2019, in Siem Reap, the conference will be hosted by a different Institution globally, annually, while Paññāsāstra remains at the helm of the Conference, so to collaborate with all institutions wishing to involve themselves with and in the CALA network.

We thus welcome you to the CALA 1, in 2019, the Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, and to the CALA in general.

Important dates:

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Opens: Friday, October 13, 2017 at midnight (UTC Time)
Closes: Monday, February 9, 2018 at midnight (UTC Time)
________________________________

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE

By March 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
________________________________

REGISTRATION

Early Bird
Opens: February 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: May 14, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Normal Bird
Opens: May 15, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: August 25, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Late Bird
Opens: August 26, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: January 26, 2019, (Conference end)
________________________________

CONFERENCE DATES

Wednesday January 23rd, 2019
Thursday January 24th, 2019
Friday January 25th, 2019
Saturday January 26th, 2019
Subfields:

  • Anthropological linguistics
  • Applied sociolinguistics
  • Cognitive Anthropology and language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Post-structuralism and language
  • Semiotics and semiology
  • Language documentation
  • General sociolinguistics
  • Language socialization
  • Social psychology of language
  • Language revitalization
  • Ethnography of communication
  • Language, community, ethnicity
  • Language, dialect, sociolect, genre
  • Nonverbal semiotics
  • Multifunctionality
  • Language and embodiment
  • Documenting language
  • Ethnographical language work
  • Language, gender, sexuality
  • Language ideologies
  • Narrative and metanarrative
  • Language and spatial and temporal frames
  • Language minorities and majorities
  • Language in real and virtual spaces

Language contact and change

Jan
24
Thu
International Conference: Peoples and Cultures of the World  @ Palermo University
Jan 24 – Jan 26 all-day

Call for papers: Peoples and Cultures of the World 

International Conference
Palermo University, January 24-25, 2019
Building 19, Viale delle Scienze, Aula Seminari A and B

Deadline for submitting proposals: 30 November 2018

Abstract: 250 words (max)
Duration of each paper: 20 minutes
Official languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish

Registration to the Conference is free of cost. Travel, accommodation and food costs are to be covered by participants.

Scientific coordination:
Leonardo Mercatanti and Stefano Montes

Organizing committee:
Irene Majo Garigliano, Leonardo Mercatanti, Giovanni Messina, Stefano Montes, Alessandro Morello, Gaetano Sabato, Flavia Schiavo, Licia Taverna

Administration:
Department of Cultures and Societies, Palermo University
Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italy

Please send your paper and short biodata to:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Information:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Jan
26
Sat
New Marco Island Historical Museum Exhibit
Jan 26 all-day

Paradise Found: 6,000 Years of People on Marco Island

Marco Island Historical Museum prepares for major 2019-2021 exhibit

Key Marco Calusa artifacts together on Marco for first time since 1896 discovery  

Marco Island, FL — July 18, 2018 — The Marco Island Historical Society (MIHS) announces that the MIHS has achieved its 25-year quest to bring “home” on loan the world-famous Key Marco Cat and other rare Pre-Columbian Native American artifacts discovered on Marco Island, Florida in 1896.

Several of the most significant Key Marco artifacts will be brought together on Marco Island for the first time since their discovery by anthropologist Frank Hamilton Cushing more than 100 years ago. The exhibit will be at the Marco Island Historical Museum (MIHM) from January 2019 to April 2021.

A free, public grand opening event for the exhibit will be held on Saturday, January 26, 2019, during Museum hours. It will include a morning ribbon cutting to celebrate the official opening of the exhibit, live music, an afternoon program/performance on the music of the Calusa by composer and musician Kat Epple and Anthropology Band and family friendly activities.

The Key Marco Cat has been described as one of the finest pieces of Pre-Columbian Native American art ever discovered in North America. At only six inches tall and carved from buttonwood, the Key Marco Cat is a charismatic anthropomorphic feline statuette that has captured the public’s imagination for more than a century. Other important pieces in the exhibition include a ceremonial mask, alligator figurehead, painted human figure and sea turtle figurehead.

The MIHS is mounting the exhibit in collaboration with Collier County Museums, the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The loaned artifacts will be featured within one of the Museum’s permanent exhibits — Paradise Found: 6,000 Years of People on Marco Island.

“This exhibition is the culmination of a long-term vision to bring these incredibly important artifacts to Marco Island on loan in order to educate and inspire people of all ages about the fascinating history of our region,” says MIHS Curator of Collections Austin Bell. “It has taken years of planning and discussions with the lending institutions and the continuation of a public-private partnership that includes the Marco Island Historical Society, Collier County and the community.”

Jan
28
Mon
Call for Proposals: AES / ALLA / ABA Joint Spring 2019 Conference
Jan 28 all-day

Conference Theme: Ethnographic Futures
Hosts: AES / ALLA / ABA
Conference Dates: March 14 to 16, 2019
Location: Washington University in St. Louis
Website: https://americanethnologist.org/meetings/spring-conference/aes-2019
CfP deadline: January 28, 2019
Registration Prices: Students $40 / $45 (member / non-member); Professional $140 / $145 (member / non-member
Travel Diversity Grant deadline & information: January 28; AESGrantsCompeti[email protected]

 

Call for Paper Abstracts for Proposed Panels

View proposed panels seeking paper abstract submissions HERE.

Abstract Submissions for Panels, Individual Papers, and Roundtables

AES, ALLA, and ABA invite proposals for individual papers, organized paper panels, and roundtables for our joint Spring 2019 Conference. Word limit for abstracts: paper up to 250 words; Session/panel up to 500 words. Submit HERE.

When submitting your proposal, you will be asked to either (a) provide your own theme(s), or (b) select from the list of pre-determined themes provided by the program committee. These themes will be used during the review and scheduling processes to reduce content overlap. If your submission does not align within one of the themes, you may select “other” and provide your theme(s) as written responses.

Pre-determined Themes:
Theorizing the Future
Methodology: Innovations, Conundrums & Engagement
Violence, Trauma & Resistance
Citizenship & Belonging
Debt & Repayments
Queer & Other Intimate Imaginings
Sanctuary & Refuge
Migration, Mobility & Borders
The State, Surveillance & In/Exclusions
Race, Ethnicity & Class Formations
Gendered Spaces & Subversions
Embodiment & the Body
Emancipatory Politics & Solidarity
Urban Futures
Health, Healing, and Ethics
Environmental Justice
Labor & Work
Consumption & Desire
Others proposed by submitters

The submissions portal closes Monday, January 28, 2019 (3pm ET).

Jan
31
Thu
2020 Directors of the ASCSA Summer Sessions (Gertrude Smith Professors)
Jan 31 all-day
DIRECTORS OF THE ASCSA SUMMER SESSIONS (GERTRUDE SMITH PROFESSORS)

Deadline: January 31, 2019

Six-Week Traditional ASCSA Summer Session: One or Two Positions
ASCSA Field Seminars: Two Positions

SIX-WEEK ASCSA SUMMER SESSION 

Term: Summer 2020

Eligibility: Former membership in the School and at least two years of teaching in a post-secondary educational institution. Qualified applicants in all areas of classical studies, including history, art history, languages, epigraphy, and archaeology, are encouraged to apply. Some knowledge of modern Greek, stamina, good health, and a sense of humor.

Description: See more information about the ASCSA Summer Sessions:  http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/programs/Summer

Duties: Plan the itinerary of the session/seminar, in consultation with the staff in Athens, at least six months prior to the session; collaborate with the Committee on the Summer Sessions in the selection of participants; correspond with participants concerning travel, equipment, academic requirements, etc.; supervise all aspects of the program in Greece, including teaching, coordinating with on-site expert lecturers, keeping a detailed log of the sessions, managing incidental expenses, and submitting a report to the Director.

Compensation: Stipend of $9,064, plus travel and expenses, housing for the Summer Session leader(s) for eight weeks in total as available June 1 to August 15. See the attached policy.

Application: A letter of application, a curriculum vitae, and three letters of support should be sent to:

Committee on the Summer Sessions E-mail:  [email protected]

The appointments will be announced by March 29.

 

ASCSA FIELD SEMINARS

Term: Summer 2020

Eligibility: Former membership in the School and at least two years of teaching in a post-secondary educational institution. Qualified applicants in all areas of classical studies, including history, art history, languages, epigraphy, and archaeology, are encouraged to apply. Some knowledge of modern Greek, stamina, good health, and a sense of humor.

Description: The theme of the18-day field seminars are open. Possible topics include: a “major sites” program (Athens, with short trips to Delphi, the Argolid, or other regions or sites); Mycenaean Greece; ancient athletics; pottery; sculpture; epigraphy; religious, public, and domestic architecture; ancient literature; numismatics; topography of myth; historical geography; the ancient economy; Roman Greece; Byzantine Greece; Ottoman Greece; the population exchange between Greece and Turkey; modern folklore; etc.

Residence in Loring Hall is available, though not required, for program participants during the first and third week of the seminar. The itinerary, therefore, must include at least one week of travel in the middle of the seminar. Two summer field seminars can be accommodated, one in June and one in July.

For more information about the ASCSA Summer Seminars:  http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/programs/summer-seminars

Duties: Plan an 18-day seminar, in consultation with the staff in Athens, at least six months prior to the session; collaborate with the Committee on the Summer Sessions in the selection of participants; correspond with participants concerning travel, equipment, academic requirements, etc.; supervise all aspects of the program, including teaching, coordinating with on-site expert lecturers, keeping a detailed log of the sessions, managing incidental expenses, and submitting a report to the Director.

Compensation: Stipend of $5000, plus travel and expenses, housing for four weeks in total including the dates of the seminar. See the attached policy.

Application: Along with a letter of application that discusses your qualifications, and a curriculum vitae, please submit a description of the seminar, and a preliminary 18-day itinerary indicating which sites would be visited and how much time would ideally be spent in and out of Athens.

These materials and three letters of support should be sent to: Committee on the Summer Sessions

E-mail:  [email protected]

The appointments will be announced by March 29.

Call for Contributors: What Anthropologists Do, Veronica Strang (2nd edition)
Jan 31 all-day

Dear Fellow Anthropologists,

We are in the process of updating an introductory ‘primer’ in Applied Anthropology, entitled What Anthropologists Do, which was initially published in 2009.

The intention was originally to introduce the subject to school leavers or first year undergraduates, who often have little idea about what anthropology is, or what anthropologists do. The purpose of this second edition remains primarily to encourage people to study anthropology and also to illustrate the wide variety of careers now available to anthropologists. The book has also become widely used in undergraduate anthropology courses, to help people think about the areas they want to focus on as they progress.

The text has a secondary purpose: many potential employers of anthropologists – industries, agencies and government organisations – also have little familiarity with anthropology as a discipline, and thus only rarely make use of anthropologists and their particular skills. By providing them with a highly accessible and updated introduction to the subject, the volume will – it is hoped – encourage greater use of anthropology and the potential insights provided by ethnographic research.

What we are looking for this time are exciting new examples of research and short autobiographical accounts describing people’s experiences in applying anthropology, especially in emergent areas.

If you would like to be involved in helping to get our discipline ‘out there’, please have a look at these new areas (below). Depending on your level of enthusiasm and ability to spend some time on this, you could send some brief examples of your current research and how you have applied anthropology. How did you get involved, and what difference has the inclusion of anthropology made in your work? (If I quote you or make broader use of your comments, this will be acknowledged.) 

And/or you could offer a short autobiographical account (1000-2000 words) of your work as an applied anthropologist, possibly including some feedback about it from the people with whom you have worked. If you think you might like to do this, please write a brief outline (about 200 words), and attach a CV as well as your contact details.

We do hope that you will support this continuing effort to encourage wider engagement with our discipline. So if you are doing some good things with anthropology, please let us know, sending responses to either [email protected] or [email protected].

Initial drafts/suggestions should be submitted by the end of September, so that we can spend October reviewing possible items to include. The deadline for the inclusion of final drafts for approved content is January 31st, 2019.

Many thanks,

Veronica Strang and Joanna Puckering

 

Summary of new areas, update for 2nd edition.

Introduction

A more substantial body of literature to mention, including basic introductions to anthropology and to professional practice.

Chapter 1. Anthropology and Advocacy

Debates on GM and related issues – new issues such as:

Neonicotinoids

Fracking

Biofuels etc.

Indigenous rights and mining issues, eg. Standing Rock

Debates about ecological justice/rights for nature

Efforts to declare rivers as ‘living ancestors’ and ‘legal persons’

Advocacy more directly in relation to non-human rights and conservation

Human rights:

More focus on displacement

Treatment of refugees

Human trafficking

Modern slavery

Rights to clean water

Rights to sanitation

Freshwater resources

Water security

Chapter 2. Anthropology and Aid

General updating with ongoing research on (and critiques of) international aid development

Medical humanitarianism

More on involvement of anthropologists in participatory action research

Material about gypsies could be updated

Chapter 3. Anthropology and Development

Ecotourism

Emergent conflicts around tourism taking over cities (eg. Barcelona, Lisbon)

Displacement of local residents in favour of profitable Air B&B accommodation etc.

Dams continue to be controversial

Diversion of limited freshwater resources into irrigation

Chapter 4. Anthropology and the Environment

Impacts of the patterns of freshwater use (and see Ch3)

Plastics in the ocean

Tipping points in extinctions

Air quality issues

Energy production/consumption

Fisheries policy (and Brexit)

Conservation controversies over big cat protection

Updates to climate change debates / anthropological perspectives

Archaeology and historical archaeology

Heritage:

 – Recent controversies over Stonehenge tunnel would update that material

 – Lighthouses and heritage

 – Land and identity

 – Strengthen the material on urban identities

Chapter 5. Anthropology and Governance

Recent rise in populism, Brexit etc.

Rising influence of social media

Anthropology’s involvement in public policy development

Changes in managerial cultures

Corporatisation of health and education institutions (schools and universities)

Continued rise of transnational corporations; their ownership of key resources and utilities

Involvement of anthropology in military and covert government activities

Chapter 6. Anthropology, Business and Industry

Business and digital developments:

 – Advertising etc. via Facebook (and related controversies)

 – Virtual realities/cyberspace

 – Online gaming

 – Employment of anthropologists by Google, Microsoft etc

Anthropologists working with unions/on industrial action

New methods such as UX (user experience) testing

Professional behaviour

Gender relations

Gender pay gap

Chapter 7.  Anthropology and Health

Sex/reproduction/technologies

Changes in the last decade, eg. issues:

 – Surrogacy

 – Sperm donation

 – Abortion

 – Child rearing

Emergent issues about millennials and health

Changes in approaches to mental health

Huge issues (especially in the UK) about the demographics of aging, dementia etc.

Related concerns around health provision:

 – NHS

 – Health insurance in the US etc.

Major new outbreaks of disease, eg. Ebola (importance of anthropological understandings)

Forensic anthropology – continues to expand, especially in relation to disaster zones

Chapter 8. Anthropology, Art and Identity

 Standalone ‘identity’ related topics

 Those expressed via art and material culture

The former:

New work dealing with gender and sexuality, eg.

 – Same sex marriage

 – Transgender issues

 – Adoption etc.

Discussions about race:

 – Re-emergence of the extreme right wing and its effects

Breakdown of federal states, eg. Scotland and Catalonia, efforts to achieve independence and outcomes to date

Visual anthropology and representation:

 – Museums

 – Cultural heritage

 – Archaeology and historical archaeology

Development and (both tangible and intangible) cultural heritage

Visual anthropology and social intervention

Chapter 9. Interdisciplinary Anthropology (New chapter)

Situations in which interdisciplinary research involves (and is assisted by the involvement of) anthropology

Issues around how anthropology is applied

The need to provide students with practical training in engaging with other disciplines

The perspectives of non-academic professionals, industry specialists etc.

Engaging with alternate forms of expertise involves:

 – seeking shared research questions

 – common theoretical framework

 – navigating sometimes difficult issues, eg. disciplinary identity, territoriality, power, access to funding, disciplinary status

Conclusion

Additional section providing a vision of where anthropology is heading in the future.

 

Feb
1
Fri
2019 Library Resident Research Fellowships 
Feb 1 all-day

Scope

The Library Resident Research fellowships support research in the Society’s collections. Comprehensive, searchable guides and finding aids to our collections are available online at https://www.amphilsoc.org/library/search-collections.

Eligibility

The APS Library invites scholars to apply for predoctoral and postdoctoral fellowships to do research in the collections. Fellowships are offered for short-term and long-term opportunities, for subject-specific research, and in digital humanities.

Stipend

Variable by program.

Deadline

TBD, but should range from February 1 to March 1.

Application

The application may be accessed at https://www.amphilsoc.org/grants/fellowships. Questions should be directed to [email protected] or 215-440-3443.

2019–20 ACOR Fellowships, Scholarships, and Awards
Feb 1 all-day

Deadline for the following fellowships is February 1, 2019.
Apply online for these fellowships https://orcfellowships.fluidreview.com/

NEH Fellowship: One award of six months for scholars who have a Ph.D. or have completed their professional training. Fields of research may include: modern and classical languages, linguistics, literature, history, jurisprudence, philosophy, archaeology, comparative religion, ethics, and the history, criticism, and theory of the arts. Social and political scientists are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals living in the U.S. three years immediately preceding the application deadline. The award for six months is $25,200. Awards must be used between May 15, 2019 and June 30, 2020. This is a residential fellowship and residency at ACOR is required.

ACOR-CAORC Post-Doctoral Fellowship: Two or more two- to six-month fellowships for post-doctoral scholars and scholars with a terminal degree in their field, pursuing research or publication projects in the natural and social sciences, humanities, and associated disciplines relating to the Middle East. U.S. citizenship required. Maximum award is $32,400. Awards must be used between June 15, 2019 and December 31, 2020. Funding for this fellowship provided by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. This is a residential fellowship and residency at ACOR is required.

ACOR-CAORC Fellowship: Two or more two- to six-month fellowships for masters and doctoral students. Fields of study include all areas of the humanities and the natural and social sciences. Topics should contribute to scholarship in Middle Eastern studies. U.S. citizenship required. Maximum award is $23,800. Awards must be used between June 15, 2019 and December 31, 2020. Funding for this fellowship provided by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. This is a residential fellowship and residency at ACOR is required.

Jennifer C. Groot Memorial Fellowship: Up to three awards of $1,500 each to support beginners in archaeological fieldwork who have been accepted as team members on archaeological projects with ASOR/CAP affiliation in Jordan. Open to undergraduate or graduate students of U.S. or Canadian citizenship as well as individuals who graduated less than 12 months before February 1, 2019 and/or have been accepted to a Graduate program for Fall 2019.

Bert and Sally de Vries FellowshipOne award of $1,500 to support a student for participation on an archaeological project or for research in Jordan. Senior project staff members whose expenses are being borne largely by the project are ineligible. Open to enrolled undergraduate or graduate students of any nationality except Jordanian citizens.

Harrell Family Fellowship: One award of $2,000 to support a graduate student for participation on an archaeological project or for research in Jordan. Senior project staff members whose expenses are being borne largely by the project are ineligible. Open to enrolled graduate students of any nationality except Jordanian citizens.

Pierre and Patricia Bikai Fellowship: Two awards for one month each or one two-month award for residency at ACOR in Amman. It is open to enrolled graduate students of any nationality, except Jordanian, who are participating in an archaeological project or conducting archaeological work in Jordan. The fellowship includes room and board at ACOR and a monthly stipend of $600.

Burton MacDonald and Rosemarie Sampson Fellowship: One award for either eight weeks residency at ACOR for research in the fields of Ancient Near Eastern languages and history, archaeology, Bible studies, or comparative religion, or a travel grant to assist with participation in an archaeological field project in Jordan. The ACOR residency fellowship option includes room and board at ACOR and a monthly stipend of $400. The travel grant option provides a single payment of $2,000 to help with any project related expenses. Both options are open to enrolled undergraduate or graduate students of Canadian citizenship or landed immigrant status.

Kenneth W. Russell Fellowship: One award of $1,800 to support a graduate student participating on an archaeological project or pursuing independent research in Jordan. For the 2019–2020 cycle, the Russell fellowship is only open only to enrolled graduate students of non-Jordanian nationality.

James A. Sauer Fellowship: One award of $1,250 towards educational assistance for a Jordanian student enrolled in an archaeology or cultural heritage degree program in any country. For the 2019–2020 cycle, the Sauer fellowship is only open to enrolled graduate students of Jordanian nationality.

Frederick-Wenger Memorial FellowshipTwo awards of $1,500 to assist a Jordanian student with the cost of their education. Eligibility is not limited to a specific field of study, but preference will be given to study related to Jordan’s cultural heritage. Candidates must be Jordanian citizens and currently enrolled as undergraduate or graduate students in a Jordanian university.

Jordanian Graduate Student Scholarship: Four awards of $3,000 each to assist Jordanian graduate students with the annual costs of their academic programs during the upcoming academic year, i.e. the period May 1, 2019 through May 31, 2020. Candidates must be Jordanian citizens and currently enrolled in either a Master’s or Doctoral program in a Jordanian university. Eligibility is limited to students in programs related to Jordan’s cultural heritage (for example: archaeology, anthropology, linguistics/epigraphy, history, conservation, museum studies, and cultural resource management related issues). Awardees who demonstrate excellent progress in their programs will be eligible to apply in consecutive years.

Deadline for the following scholarship is February 1, 2019.
See the application instruction for this scholarship:

Jordanian Travel Scholarship for ASOR Annual Meeting: Two travel scholarships of $3,500 each to assist Jordanians participating and delivering a paper at the ASOR Annual meeting in mid-November in the United States. Academic papers should be submitted through the ASOR’s website (www.asor.org/am) by February 1, 2019. Final award selection will be determined by the ASOR program committee.

Please Note: NEH, CAORC, MacDonald and Sampson (residency option), and Bikai Fellows will reside at the ACOR facility in Amman while conducting their research.

Call for Proposals: Understanding the Rules of Life: Epigenetics
Feb 1 all-day

Understanding the Rules of Life: Epigenetics (NSF 18-600) invites proposals which investigate heritable biological or chemical mechanisms that produce a phenotypic effect without alteration of the DNA sequence.  Projects must integrate education perspectives and research approaches from more than one research discipline (e.g., biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, social and behavioral sciences) to understand epigenetic mechanisms associated with environmental change, the resultant phenotypic characteristics of organisms, and the resultant robustness and adaptability of organisms and populations. Studies that cross multiple levels of organizational complexity (molecular, cellular, physiological, organismal, population) and temporal (including evolutionary) scales, and taxa within the tree of life – both unicellular and multicellular organisms, including humans — are particularly encouraged.

Full proposals are due February 1, 2019, and can be submitted in one of two submission tracks:

(1) award duration of up to 3 years and a total budget of $500,000 or

(2) award duration of up to 5 years and a total budget of $3,000,000.

The specifics of the program priorities and areas of emphasis, as well as additional limitations and guidelines, can be found in the full solicitation.

Lake Atitlan Ethnographic Field School
Feb 1 all-day

19th Annual Ethnographic Field School

When: Summer, June 2 to July 14, 2019

Where: Lake Atitlán, Guatemala

What: Learn how to design, conduct, investigate and write up your own independent project while living with a local family on the shores of Lake Atitlán, Guatemala. Throughout the program, you will learn about Maya culture while developing skills in project design and fieldwork as you carry out your own research project.

Who: All Majors welcome! This program is open to students from any major and all universities. Whether you are an undergraduate, a graduate student, or just finished college, learning how to collect data and talk to people is beneficial not only for those in anthropology, but also for those in many other majors, including sociology, international studies, public health, history, education, textiles, natural resource management, business and management, sociolinguistics, political science, psychology, design and engineering.  Anyone interested is encouraged to apply. We work with students with a variety of interests to help develop individualized research projects.

How: See what research is really like, do your own project, manage your own time and work according to the needs of your topic. Challenge yourself by living in a Maya community with a local family. We keep the seminars to a minimum, so students can have enough time to work on their projects; we want students to learn by doing, with intensive and in-depth hands-on learning.

Costs: The $4000 fee includes room and board, insurance, in-country travel, and tuition for 6 credit hours (airfare not included- about $600). Get in touch with us for ideas about funding your study abroad experience!

Apply: Apply through the CSUDH Study Abroad Website.  Visit the Guatemala EFS Program website for more information and photos from previous years. The application deadline is February 1, 2019. Applications received after this time are accepted on a rolling basis as space permits.

Contact us: Dr. Sarah R. Taylor [email protected]; Dr. Tim Wallace [email protected]