Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jun
29
Fri
Call for Proposals: Expanding Cooperation on Migration
Jun 29 all-day

The Second Annual Metropolis North American Migration Policy Forum

Expanding Cooperation on Migration: People, Economy, and Security in the Unites States, Mexico and Canada

The Mexican Secretariat of Foreign Affairs, Mexico City

Longstanding migration flows to and through North America are changing. Shifts in patterns—both driving policy change and responding to it—require fresh thinking across borders. Around the world, proliferating crises have increased the number of refugees and asylum seekers on the move, triggering enhanced border security and vetting protocols in many countries. Within North America, a well-worn north-bound migration pattern is complemented by an increasing southward flow to Mexico and beyond. This stream comprises both those who voluntarily migrate and those being repatriated. And within each North American country, there appear growing concerns about the capacity to receive and integrate new arrivals. Publics unevenly perceive the social and economic benefits of migration and question the government’s ability to effectively manage it. At the same time, under NAFTA, North America has seen reduced barriers to trade, investment and cross-border movement of goods and services. However, the agreement is currently under a contentious renegotiation among the three countries. While migration is not a core NAFTA issue, changes or outright cancellation of the agreement could have migration effects.

The second annual Metropolis North America policy forum builds on the foundational understanding gained at the inaugural forum in Washington, and seeks to identify areas where cooperation is occurring, possible and/or desired. Amidst the backdrop of shifting migration patterns and evolving relationships, approaches can benefit from imagination and should consider actors beyond national governments, including subnational levels and other sectors of society. The key aim of the Mexico City forum is to explore where expanded cooperation across the continent on migration can both promote security and grow the economy in all three countries. Building on innovative approaches and ideas, organizers will seek to bolster a North American migration research agenda that can support these opportunities with insight and analysis from a continental perspective.

Find below some suggested themes:

  • Labor Mobility
  • Temporary Foreign Workers
  • Family Migration
  • Economic Migration
  • International Students
  • Refugees
  • Credentials Recognition
  • Migration, Human Rights and the Law
  • Binational and Multinational Migration Agreements
  • Trade and Migration
  • Border Security
  • Border States and Cities
  • Governance of Immigration: The Role of Federal, State/ Provincial Governments
  • Immigration and the Specific Role of Cities and Municipalities
  • Citizenship
  • Public Safety
  • Settlement and Integration
  • Employment Training
  • Unaccompanied Minors
  • Emigration, Deportation and Return Migration

All sessions must have bilateral or trilateral participation from the United States, Mexico and/or Canada.
Workshops (90 minutes):

Workshops will usually consist of four to a maximum of 5 presentations of approximately 15 minutes each followed by at least 20 minutes of discussion. Workshop coordinators will preside over the session or designate another individual to do so.

Roundtables (90 minutes):

The roundtable format is suitable for more informal discussions of emerging issues or to unpack controversial topics. It is a very effective format for the exchange of information and experiences among a relatively small number of people. The organizer or designated person chairs the roundtable with bi/tri national discussants. An 8 person limit per roundtable discussion is recommended because of the desire to actively engage all participants in the session and the physical arrangement of the tables around which the discussions will take place.

SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL
Please note that you will be required to include the following information with your submission:

  • Name and contact information
  • Format of your session (workshop or roundtable)
  • Title of your session
  • Names of co-organizers (if applicable)
  • Names of presenters including their affiliation, email address and titles of their presentation
  • 50-word abstract which will be included in the program (please make sure it is descriptive, but is also formulated to interest as many conference participants as possible)
  • 250-word summary for consideration by the Adjudication Committee Your proposal should be emailed to Sarah Kooi ([email protected])
    by June 29th, 2018.
Jun
30
Sat
Call for Proposals: Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life
Jun 30 all-day

Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life

ABOUT THE SERIES:

How are urban processes entangled with human experiences? In this series, scholarly monographs and edited volumes explore this question and illuminate diverse forms of such entanglement through empirically-based research. This series emphasizes anthropological approaches to the study of human life in relation to the urban. It seeks to illuminate experiences and effects of urban cultures and situate specific cases in a comparative set. By exploring the intricacies of human-urban relations, this series contributes to better understanding of the ways that humans particularly conceive of and experience nature, personhood, ethics, culture, and social life.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

To submit a manuscript for consideration by Lexington Books, please send:

  • a prospectus (see below for details)
  • a detailed table of contents
  • one or two sample chapters
  • your curriculum vitae

If you are proposing a contributed volume, please include titles, affiliations, and brief resumes for each of the contributors, as well as chapter abstracts.

The prospectus should include:

  1. A description of the book, describing the core themes, arguments, issues, goals, and/or topics of the work, what makes it unique, what questions it seeks to answer, and why you are qualified to write it. (2-5 pages)
  2. A description of your target audience (undergraduate or graduate students? scholars? professionals?).
  3. An analysis of competing or similar books (including publishers and dates), indicating distinctive and original elements of your project that set it apart from these other works.
  4. A list of courses in which your book might be used as a text or supplementary text, indicating the course level at which this book may be used.
  5. An indication of whether any part of your manuscript has been published previously, and if it is a doctoral dissertation, what changes you are proposing to prepare it for publication.
  6. The length of the manuscript either as a word count or a page count (12-point type on double-spaced 8.5”×11” pages). Will there be figures, tables, or other non-text material, and, if so, approximately how many? If the text is not complete, please still estimate its final length, not including the non-text material.
  7. If the manuscript is not complete, an estimation of when it will be finished. Is there a particular date by which you hope the book will be published (due to a historical anniversary, conference, etc.?
  8. The names of four to seven respected scholars in your field with whom you have no personal or professional relationship. Include their titles, affiliations, e-mail addresses, and/or mailing addresses.
  9. An indication of whether the manuscript is under consideration by other publishers.

Please do not send your entire manuscript.

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Jessica Bodoh-Creed is lecturer of anthropology at California State University.

Melissa King is assistant professor of anthropology at San Bernardino Valley College

Leonido Gines Jr. is lecturer of architecture at De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, and founder of studioGINES.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact: Jessica Bodoh-Creed ([email protected]), Leonido Gines Jr. ([email protected]), and Melissa King ([email protected])

Jul
26
Thu
2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society
Jul 26 – Jul 29 all-day

Call for Papers, Posters, and Organized Sessions: 2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society Portland, Oregon

July 26‐29, 2018

MEETING THEME: Science in Society, Society in Science – Toward a 21st Century Model for Social Scientific Research

Growing public skepticism about the value of science and expert knowledge has been a defining characteristic of the early 21st century. Critiques of science come from many sources – populist anti‐elite social movements, academic studies of conventional scientific methods and institutions, and advocates for a more participatory approach to knowledge production. As the distinction between ‘facts’ and ‘values’ has become blurred, the evidence‐base that informs current policy becomes increasingly contested territory. Notably, social scientists have long relied on evidence and scientific research to challenge popular misunderstandings of social problems like poverty, crime, racism, and sexism. At the same time, they have been at the forefront of critiques of the mainstream scientific enterprise and helped pioneer new approaches to research and engagement.

Professional social science societies (like RSS) have an obligation to support those who are studying and developing effective responses to the challenges faced by rural people and places in a globalized world. New models for scientific research will be increasingly important if our efforts are to inform public discourse and shape the development of effective public policies. To do this, we need to reconcile tensions between the desire to retain the power and insights of rigorous scientific methods, and our awareness of the societal biases associated with conventional scientific institutions. At the 2018 Annual Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, we particularly encourage attendees to present work that explores this vexing and enduring issue, and to provide examples of innovative approaches to applied scientific research on rural topics.

Over the last 80 years, the annual meetings of the RSS have been a venue for the exchange of ideas and information about a wide range of rural issues. Our attendees include faculty and students from diverse colleges and universities, researchers working in government or nonprofit institutions, and rural activists and practitioners. In addition to presentations on the meeting theme, we always invite presentations of research and engagement focused rural people, places and themes from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives.

Abstracts: Abstracts should be approximately 350‐500 words and briefly outline the purpose and theoretical framing of the paper, poster, program, or organized session. Where appropriate, include information about methods, data, and preliminary findings. The deadline for submitting papers, posters and sessions is Thursday, February 1, 2018, 11:59 pm (EST).

To submit, visit the “Annual Meetings” tab on the RSS website, www.ruralsociology.org.

Please contact the Program Chair, Kate MacTavish ([email protected]) or the RSS Business Office ([email protected]) with any questions about submission or to explore ideas for special events at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Aug
20
Mon
Changing Global Hierarchies of Value? Museums, artifacts , frames, and flows
Aug 20 – Aug 22 all-day

Call for papers for the international conference 

Changing Global Hierarchies of Value? Museums, artifacts , frames, and flows

University of Copenhagen / National Museum of Denmark, 20–22 August, 2018

Museums are said to classify the world; but the world is changing, and so are the museum worlds and the worlds of arts and artefacts. This conference explores how the world is imagined and classified through the presentation, interpretation and classification of artifacts; and how the global hierarchy of value (cf. Herzfeld 2004) might be changing in through these flows and circulations.

In 2007, the German art historian Hans Belting coined the term “global art” to indicate that contemporary art was no longer the province of artists in the Global North, thus signaling a sea change in the international art world (Belting, in Weibel and Buddensieg 2007). Art historians, prior to Belting had long stipulated that the birth of modern art in 19th and 20th century Europe was partially predicated on inspirations from outside Europe in the guise of Orientalism, Chinoiserie, Japonisme, or “primitivism,” yet these modern artists were almost exclusively from Europe and—later—North America. Non-European artists went largely unnamed and unrecognized, as French surrealist poet André Breton’s famous mur d’atelier revealed. Modern art from the Global South or rapidly modernizing states in Eurasia and East Asia, was often dismissed as derivative of Western art, while contemporary traditional art was considered inauthentic (cf. Kasfir 1992).

Simultaneously, anthropologist Michael Herzfeld (2004) coined the term “global hierarchy of value” to denote the global cultural asymmetry that constituted the cultural successor to the political and military domination of European colonial systems. In the arts, early partial exceptions were Latin America, which—as the historical product of creole nationalisms (cf. Anderson 1982) and hence as a “pseudo-Europe” – saw the emergence of successful artists like Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo and of movements like Brazilian modernism and neo-concretism; and Japan, which experimented with locally inflected, but modern, architecture. The imbalance in the Euro-centered art world changed when the Magiciens de la Terre exhibition was held in Paris (1989) and featured contemporary art by both Western and non-Western—and named—artists in equal numbers, albeit without implying an equal hierarchy of value.

The Magiciens de la Terre exhibition marked the coming out of contemporary artists from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Oceania on the global arts scene, and brought out in their participation in numerous exhibitions such as the Modernités plurielles at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, but also in biennales, art festivals, art fairs, and auctions around the world. Simultaneously, art institutions and events outside of Europe and North America gained in global prominence, by adopting the cultural forms, classificatory devices and exhibitionary technologies developed in Euro-America and applying those in their own contexts and for their own purposes. One could say that while the modern period witnessed the emergence of a global Europe, the current “post-postcolonial” period is marked by the globalization of the other continents—at least in terms of the arts: in that sense it is increasingly possible to speak of global Asia, global Africa, global Latin America as geographic entities that challenge the global hierarchy of value. 

At the same time, recent decades have seen the unfolding of increasingly interconnected global networks of production, labor, consumption, and capital accumulation, a process broadly known as globalization. But can we also talk of a globalized taste regime or set of preferences à la Bourdieu? Are recently booming or expanding global players in Asia, Africa, and Latin America reconfiguring the relative value of styles, objects, or traditional artifacts, thereby challenging the old Eurocentric order and organization of the good and the beautiful? Even if the West remains the universal unmarked, attention should be given to the ways in which it is now often amplified, mocked, or ironized by non-Western masters of its artistic, architectural, or artisanal forms. How is globalization affecting existing or emerging museums as economic and commercial players in a world of accelerating mass tourism and brand fixation? How is the complex past of European interaction and Eurocentric notions of cosmopolitanism rethought and exhibited today in postcolonial theaters of historical encounter, exchange, or conflict?    

This is the final conference of the project ‘Global Europe: Constituting Europe from the Outside In through Artefacts’ (see http://globaleurope.ku.dk/). The Global Europe project explores how the collection, circulation, classification and museum exhibition of objects define Europe from the outside in during Europe’s present loss of global hegemony—especially in relation to Japan and four non-European BRICS countries (Brazil, China, India, South Africa), in comparison with the early modern period of European ascendancy. This ‘Changing Global Hierarchies of Value?’ conference invites both paper proposals on a range of topics that explore global networks of valuation and validation and their local forms and entanglements in the current period. The papers are expected to be empirically grounded, and may—but do not have to—refer to the five countries targeted by the Global Europe project.

The keynote speech titled Museum Transactions: Negotiating Knowledges, Governing Cultures will be presented by Professor Tony Bennett of the Institute for Culture and Society of the Western Sydney University in Australia. Tony Bennett is the author of—among many other works—The birth of the museum: history, theory, politics (1995), Pasts beyond memories: evolution, museums, colonialism (2004), and Making culture, changing society (2013); and he currently leads the project ‘Museum, Field, Metropolis, Colony: Practices of Social Governance.’ For more information, please see https://www.westernsydney.edu.au/ics/people/researchers/tony_bennett.

The conference is convened by Prof Oscar Salemink, Amélia Siegel Corrêa PhD, Jens Sejrup PhD, Caroline Lillelund and Vibe Nielsen, who make up the research team for the Global Europe project.

Please send your abstract (300 words max) and short bio (300 words max)  to Marie Yoshida [email protected] before April 1, 2018. For inquiries, please contact Oscar Salemink [email protected].

Sep
15
Sat
Migrants and Refugees in the Law
Sep 15 all-day

MIGRANTS AND REFUGEES IN THE LAW

Historic evolution, current situation and unsolved questions

IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE CHAIR INNOCENT III

Murcia (Spain), December 12 -13 -14, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS
International Chair Innocent III calls on all interested researchers to submit papers related to the human mobility and the reception of refugees according to History of Law, Canon Law, Roman Law, Comparative Law, Philosophy, Theology, History, Sociology, Historiography and any other discipline related to the main theme, as stated in the following: 

SESSIONS

December 12: session  1.  THE MIGRATION IN  THE ANCIENT  AND MEDIEVAL HISTORY. Historical approach to human mobility.
December 13: session 2. NATION, STATE, REVOLUTION. The situation of the migrants and the refugees from the origin of the modern State.
December 14: session 3. BETWEEN EMERGENCY AND ORDINARINESS: Proposals for the enhancement of a constant phenomenon in the contemporary age

PROPOSALS

Title, academic affiliation, short CV and Abstract – 200 words – (EN, IT, ES, DE, FR), via mail:  [email protected] 

DEADLINE

September 15, 2018. The Scientific Committee will respond to the proposal before September 30, 2018. 

PUBLICATION

Papers selected by the Scientific Committee will be published in the special issue of the journal Vergentis (ISSN: 2445-2394) in the first half of 2019.

 

IV Congreso Internacional CÁTEDRA INOCENCIO III

Murcia (España), 12,13,14 diciembre de 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS
La Cátedra Internacional Inocencio III invita a los investigadores interesados a presentar trabajos relacionados con el tema de la movilidad humana y la acogida de los refugiados desde el punto de vista del Historia del Derecho, Derecho Canónico, Derecho Romano, Derecho Comparado, Filosofía, Teología, Historia, Sociología y cualquier otra disciplina relacionada con el tema propuesto, en el marco de las siguientes 

SESIONES

12     de diciembre: sesión 1. LA MIGRACIÓN EN EL MUNDO ANTIGUO Y MEDIEVAL. Enfoque histórico del tema de la movilidad humana.
13    de diciembre: sesión   2. NACIÓN, ESTADO, REVOLUCIÓN. La situación de los migrantes y de los refugiados desde el nacimiento del Estado moderno.
14     de diciembre: sesión 3. ENTRE LA EMERGENCIA Y LO ORDINARIO. Propuestas para la valorización de un fenómeno constante en la edad contemporánea

PRESENTACIÓN DE PROPUESTAS

Título de la comunicación, afiliación académica, breve curriculum vitae y resumen de 200 palabras. Idiomas: EN, IT, ES, DE y FR, vía email: [email protected] 

FECHA LÍMITE

15 de septiembre de 2018. El Comité científico aceptará o rechazará la propuesta antes del 30 de septiembre de 2018. 

PUBLICACIÓN

Las comunicaciones elegidas por el Comité científico serán publicadas en el número monográfico de la Revista Vergentis (ISSN: 2445-2394) en el primer semestre del año 2019.

 

IV Congresso Internazionale CATTEDRA INNOCENZO III

Murcia (Spagna), 12,13,14 dicembre 2018

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

La Cattedra Innocenzo III invita gli studiosi interessati ad apportare il loro contributo scientifico sul tema della mobilità umana e dell’accoglienza dei rifugiati dal punto di vista della Storia del Diritto, del Diritto Canonico, del Diritto Romano, del Diritto Comparato, della Filosofia, della Teologia, della Storia, della Sociologia, e di ogni altra disciplina pertinente al tema proposto, nell’ambito delle seguenti

SESSIONI

  • dicembre: sessione LA MIGRAZIONE NEL MONDO ANTICO E MEDIEVALE. Approccio storico al tema della mobilità umana.
  • dicembre: sessione NAZIONE, STATO, RIVOLUZIONE. La situazione dei migranti e dei rifugiati a partire dalla nascita dello Stato moderno.
  • dicembre: sessione TRA EMERGENZA E ORDINARIETÀ. Proposte per la valorizzazione di un fenomeno costante nell’età contemporanea.

PRESENTAZIONE DELLE PROPOSTE

Titolo della comunicazione, affiliazione accademica, breve curriculum vitae e abstract di 200 parole. Lingue: EN, IT, ES, DE, FR, via mail a: [email protected]

TERMINE

15 settembre 2018. Il Comitato scientifico darà risposta a coloro che avranno presentato l’abstract entro il 30 settembre 2018.

PUBBLICAZIONE

Le comunicazioni scelte dal comitato scientifico saranno pubblicate nel numero monografico della Rivista Vergentis (ISSN: 2445-2394) nel primo semestre del 2019.

Sep
19
Wed
Vienna Anthropology Days 2018
Sep 19 – Sep 22 all-day

VANDA Call for Papers – Deadline extended until June 15th, 2018. Submit your paper now!

VANDA is an international conference, taking place in the beautiful capital of Austria on September 19-22, 2018, which aims to bring together scholars from various fields of anthropology, social sciences and humanities.

VANDA is meant to be more than a mainstream conference. It includes an interactive Young Scholars’ Forum, where graduate students can network, receive mentoring and practical advice from experienced researchers. Apart from the classic conference formats session organizers are free to introduce their own creative formats.

VANDA is a green, socially inclusive conference and offers a unique social activity program.

VANDA is a joint effort by three anthropological institutions in town – the Institute for Social Anthropology (ISA) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the Weltmuseum Wien (formerly the Museum of Ethnology), and the Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology at the University of Vienna.

 

Sep
27
Thu
German Studies Association: Call for Seminar Proposals
Sep 27 – Sep 30 all-day

GERMAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION: CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

The 42nd GSA Conference in Pittsburgh, PA (September 27–30, 2018) will continue to host a series of seminars in addition to conference sessions and roundtables.

Seminars meet for all three days of the conference. They explore new avenues of academic exchange and foster extended discussion, rigorous intellectual debate, and intensified networking. Seminars are typically proposed and led by two to three conveners and they consist of 12 to 20 participants, including scholars from different disciplines and at different career stages. Seminars may enable extended discussion of a recent academic publication; the exploration of a promising new research topic; engagement with pre-circulated papers; an opportunity to debate the work of scholars with different approaches; the coming together of groups of scholars seeking to develop an anthology; or the in-depth discussion of a political or public policy issue, novel, film, poem, artwork, or musical piece.

In order to facilitate extended discussion, seminar conveners and participants should participate in all three seminar meetings. Please note that seminar conveners and seminar applicants who have been accepted for seminar participation will not be allowed to submit a paper in a regular panel session. However, they may take on one additional role in the conference as moderator or commentator on another session independent of their enrollment in a seminar, or they may participate in a roundtable.

Although we accept proposals from conveners who have directed a seminar during the past two consecutive years, we give preference to newcomers and thus encourage the rotation of seminar conveners in similarly-themed seminars. We further recommend that those conveners contact the coordinators of the Interdisciplinary Network Committee, Professors Pamela Potter ([email protected]) and Winson Chu ([email protected]), to establish an official GSA Network on their topic.

The application process has two steps. Initially, we invite you to submit a preliminary proposal that includes the following items:

  1. Title
  2. Names of conveners
  3. A 150-word description of the seminar’s subject (which will eventually be used in the call for participants, the printed program, and the online program/mobile app)
  4. A 50-word description of the format of the seminar (which will also appear in the call for participants, etc.)

These items are due by November 13, 2017.

Please submit your application online at https://www.xcdsystem.com/gsa. Your username and password are the same ones you use to log in to your GSA profile at https://thegsa.org/members/profile. Please note that you must be a current member of the GSA to submit a proposal. If you need your password reset, please contact Ms. Ursula Gray ([email protected]) at Johns Hopkins University Press. If technical questions or problems arise with the submission interface itself, please contact Elizabeth Fulton at [email protected].

At this point, the GSA Seminar Committee will provide suggestions and assistance for the final submission, which is due by December 13, 2017. The committee will then review seminar proposals and post a list of approved seminars and their topics on the GSA website by early January 2018.

 

The GSA Seminar Committee consists of:

Margaret Eleanor Menninger (Texas State University) | [email protected] (Chair)

Maria Mitchell (Franklin & Marshall College) | [email protected]

Faye Stewart (Georgia State University) | [email protected]

Sep
30
Sun
CFP: 40th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association
Sep 30 all-day

CFP:   40th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association, March 7-9, 2019  Kansas City, Missouri: EXPLORATIONS 

The NCSA conference committee invites proposals that examine the theme of explorations in the history, literature, art, music and popular culture of the nineteenth century.

Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome from North American, British, European, Asian, African and worldwide perspectives.

From the early nineteenth century, when Lewis and Clark paddled through the Kansas City area on their way up the Missouri River to explore the North American continent, through the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, the building of factories and railroads, the mechanization of agriculture, and the advent of mass-produced cultural artifacts, the American Midwest became a crossroads for explorers and inventors, hucksters and entrepreneurs, artists and musicians, poets and dreamers who pursued their discoveries toward destinations made possible by the wide-open spaces of the Great Plains. In this way, the Kansas City region is emblematic of a larger set of trends in the global evolution of culture that radically altered the fundamental conditions of human existence during the nineteenth century.

  • How does the discovery of new geographical knowledge change the perception of human possibility?
  • How do innovations in science and technology affect the development of literature, music and art?
  • How does the recovery of previously unheard voices – of women, of workers, of ethnic minorities and people of color – influence the understanding of social history in America and the wider world?
  • Topics for investigation include encounters between Western explorers and indigenous people; the impact of steamships and railways upon changing perceptions of time and space; resistance and accommodation between traditional folkways and mass-produced culture; and the development of new idioms in literature, art and music to express the broader horizons of nineteenth-century self-awareness.

Proposals are due by September 30, 2018. Send 300-word abstracts (as an email attachment in MS Word format) along with a one-page CV to [email protected]

Call for Roundtable Proposals:  Roundtable discussions provide conference attendees the opportunity to engage in spirited conversation and collaborative exchange of information and resources. The format of roundtable discussions will be lively, interactive discourse among presenters and conference participants, not lecture or panel-style delivery. Roundtable sessions will be 80 minutes long. Presenters should regard themselves primarily as facilitators and should limit their own prepared remarks to five minutes or less. Extensive collaboration among the presenters before the conference is encouraged, since the goal is to foster extensive, diverse, and cogent perspectives on interdisciplinary research topics of general interest to NCSA members. Roundtables should be pre-organized by a group of 4-8 presenters. To propose a roundtable topic, please send a single 300-word abstract describing the general topic of the roundtable (as an email attachment in MS Word format) to [email protected].

Your abstract should include the proposed session title and the full name of each presenter, with their email and phone contacts, job title and affiliation. Indicate which presenter has agreed to serve as discussion moderator. Please be sure to confirm the participation of all presenters before submitting your abstract.

Roundtable proposals are due by September 30, 2018.

Conference Venue: The conference will be held at the newly renovated Marriott Country Club Plaza in midtown Kansas City, adjacent to the open-air shops and restaurants of the Country Club Plaza and in easy walking distance of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.  Conference Registration will open in December 2018. AV requirements are due January 1, early registration closes on January 20, and registration ends on February 20.  Conference website: http://www.ncsaweb.net/Current-Conference

Oct
18
Thu
African American Digital Humanities 2018
Oct 18 – Oct 20 all-day

Intentionally Digital. Intentionally Black.
African American Digital Humanities 2018
University of Maryland
October 18-20, 2018

Call for Proposals
What happens to digital humanities inquiry when we begin with Black culture, Black thought, and Black persons at the center of our endeavors? How does this shift challenge and expand both the humanities and the digital? What happens to Black and African American humanities research when we lead with the digital?

Interdisciplinary inquiry into both the online practices of black users and humanities research focused on black history and culture using digital tools has expanded in the past decade. Too often, this work happens on the margins of established disciplines, boundaries, and paradigms. Rather than arriving at black digital research as an afterthought or a tactic to achieve “diversity”, privileging black theory and black culture in our scholarship can provide alternate paradigms through which to understand the digital and the humanistic.

The first national conference of the African American Digital Humanities (AADHum) Initiative atthe University of Maryland will explore how digital studies and digital humanities-based research, teaching, and community projects can center African American history and culture. AADHum invites submissions that may include scholarly inquiry into Black diasporic and African American uses of digital technologies; digital humanities projects that focus on black history and culture; race and digital theory; the intersection of black studies and digital humanities; information studies, cultural heritage, and community-based digital projects; pedagogical interventions; digital tools and artifacts; black digital humanities and memory; social media and black activism/movements, etc.

Proposal Submissions
We invite submissions from within and outside the academy – students, faculty, librarians, independent scholars and community members – to actively participate in the conference! Proposals are due by April 9, 2018.

• Proposals should be submitted online at https://www.conftool.pro/aadhum2018/
• Multiple proposal submissions (maximum of 3 submissions) from an individual or group are acceptable
• Selections and notifications will be made by mid-June 2018

Types of Proposals
· Individual papers. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words and brief bio (75 words).
· Panels. Please provide a panel rationale of no more than 300 words, with individual paper abstracts (150-300 words) for up to 5 participants. Include titles and institutional affiliations for each participant.
· Digital Posters. Posters may present work on any relevant topic in any stage of development. Poster presentations are intended to be interactive, providing the opportunity to exchange ideas one-on-one with attendees. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words.
· Tools/Digital project demonstration. Tools/Digital Project demonstrations are intended to showcase near-complete or completed work in an interactive environment. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words. Abstracts should include 1) research significance, 2) stage (near complete/complete), 3) intervention of platform/project/tool 4) demonstration requirements (technology).
· Roundtables. Please provide a rationale of no more than 300 words, accompanied by a list of 4-5 participants (including title and institutional affiliation).

For each proposal please include 3-5 keywords.

  • Examples of topics
  • Abundance and deprivation
  • Activism
  • Africa and the Americas
  • Afro-futurism, -pragmatism and -pessimism
  • Agency and movements
  • Anti-racisms
  • Archives and archival practices
  • Arts and visual cultures
  • Blackness in everyday life
  • Comparative Blackness
  • Cyber/digital feminism
  • Digital presence
  • Digital slave studies
  • Ethics
  • Empirical and epistemological considerations
  • Evaluating digital scholarship
  • Intersectionality
  • Gaming
  • Languages and literatures
  • Local and regional history
  • Memory and commemoration
  • Methods and tools
  • Migration and movement
  • Mobile technologies
  • Pedagogy
  • Performance studies
  • Platform studies
  • Poetics and aesthetics
  • Public humanities
  • Sexualities
  • Social media
  • Space and place
  • Systems of institutional power
  • Within and beyond the academy
  • Youth cultures

About AADHum
The AADHum Initiative (Synergies among African American History and Culture and Digital Humanities) at the University of Maryland is an initiative funded in part by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. AADHum seeks to prepare the next generation of scholars and scholarship by facilitating critical dialogue between digital humanists and African American centered humanities scholarship. The Initiative works to expand the reach of the digital humanities into African American/Africana/Black Studies while enriching humanities research with new methods, archives, and tools. This initiative enhances digital research while recognizing the expertise and knowledge from traditional humanities research and how it may propel digital scholarship forward. In so doing, it fosters a dialogue among a community of scholars from within and outside the academy as they venture into new research and pedagogical endeavors.

Please direct all questions to [email protected]

Oct
22
Mon
CFP: Southern Studies Conference 2019 @ Auburn University at Montgomery
Oct 22 all-day

CFP: Southern Studies Conference, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL, February 1-2, 2019

Now in its eleventh year, the AUM Southern Studies Conference, hosted by Auburn University at Montgomery, explores themes related to the American South across a wide array of disciplines and methodologies. Registrants to the two-day conference enjoy a variety of peer-reviewed panels, two distinguished keynote speakers and a visiting artist, who gives a talk and mounts a gallery exhibition.

The 2019 Conference Committee invites proposals for twenty-minute academic papers or creative presentations on any aspect of Southern Studies (broadly defined), including those relating to the fields of anthropology, geography, art history, history, literature, theater, music, communications, political science, and sociology. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

–Southern food studies
–Pedagogy and the teaching of Southern topics
–Canonicity and the South
–Slavery and the American South
–Civil War narratives
–Southern archives, museums, and collections
–Civil Rights narratives
–Southern Geographies
–Explorations of race and conflict in the South
–Religion in the South
–Southern literature
–History of science or medicine in the South
–Southern arts (in any medium or genre)
–Southern architecture
–Explorations of the Southern worker
–Southern politics
–Anthropological studies of the South
–Sociological studies of the South
–Southern music
–Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
–Native American topics of the South
–Stories of immigration/migration and border-crossings
–Contemporary re/mis-conceptions of “The South”
–Presentations by artists/performers/writers working in the South/making work about the South

 

Proposals can be emailed to [email protected] and should include a 250-word abstract and a 2-page CV. The deadline for submission is October 22, 2018. Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend, if accepted. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by November 2018. For more information, please visit the conference website, or contact Naomi Slipp, Conference Director and Assistant Professor of Art History, Auburn University at Montgomery: [email protected].