Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Mar
1
Thu
Thinking Gender, Pre-existing Conditions
Mar 1 – Mar 2 all-day

Thinking Gender, Pre-existing Conditions

28th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference

March 1-2, 2018

UCLA Faculty Center

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Terri Conley, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan

FEATURED WORKSHOP: Trauma-Informed Yoga led by Zabie Yamasaki, Program Director of Trauma-Informed Yoga Programs at UCLA

 

The UCLA Center for the Study of Women invites submissions of paper, poster, speed pitching research roundtable, and visual arts proposals for our 28th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference. This year’s conference theme, Pre-existing Conditions, will focus on the interactions of health and gender as a play on the current, on-going discussions about gender-focused health and healthcare. Pre-existing Conditions invites conversations about the directions and foci of intersectional and multi-contextual approaches to health and well-being. With our focus on gender and health, Thinking Gender 2018, Pre-existing Conditions, welcomes submissions of graduate student projects on a wide range of health and health-related topics (see the attached call or visit http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP for details).

 

Deadline for All Proposal Submissions: November 1, 2017

Submission Information

We invite proposal submissions for the following categories:

  • Panel Presentations
  • Posters
  • Speed Pitching Research Roundtables
  • Visual Arts Reception and Exhibition

Registered graduate students from any institution are eligible to submit presentation proposals for all Thinking Gender sessions, including the panel, poster, speed pitching research roundtable, and Visual Arts Reception & Exhibition sessions.

Registered undergraduate students from any institution are eligible to submit proposals for poster presentations and participation in the Visual Arts Reception & Exhibition only.

Full details – including proposal length requirements and additional specifications – are available in the attached call for proposals and on our website at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP.

To participate in Thinking Gender, successful applicants will be required to pay a registration fee of $50, the entirety of which will go towards covering conference costs. Participants for whom the registration fee is prohibitive are encouraged to contact [email protected].

Deadlines

The deadline for all submission proposals is November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made online via the link at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP. Once submissions are reviewed and accepted, all participants in the paper panel sessions will be required to submit a draft of their paper by January 29, 2018, for pre-circulation among their co-panelists and faculty moderator.

For full details, including proposal length requirements, additional specifications, and a link to the online submission system, visit http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP.

Mar
7
Wed
Anthrosophia 2018
Mar 7 – Mar 10 all-day

ANTHROSOPHIA 2018: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Philosophy, Anthropology, and Allied Disciplines

Dates:                     March 7–10, 2018

Location:               Center for Human-Environmental Research

3400 St. Claude Ave., New Orleans, LA 70117

 

Founded in 2015, Anthrosophia is an annual interdisciplinary conference bridging the fields of philosophy, anthropology, and allied social sciences. The conference is dedicated to the holistic investigation of the questions of how and why human societies organize themselves in the diverse ways that we do today, and have done in the past. The basic premise of Anthrosophia is that the fields of philosophy and anthropology have much more in common than is typically acknowledged. Philosophical claims about humans and human societies had to start somewhere and, indeed, they usually began as basic empirical generalizations about the nature of human behavior. Anthropology began as an offshoot from the field philosophy in the early 19th century and it continues to carry the same fundamental set of theoretical building blocks with it into the present day.

As an interdisciplinary conference, Anthrosophia aims to articulate the theoretical principles, methodological orientations, and empirical data that form the basis of philosophy and anthropology as traditionally distinct fields. Through this collaboration, we hope to identify persistent shortcomings and biases in our thinking about the nature of human social life and to find better ways forward.

Participants may give oral presentations of up to 20 minutes. If you wish to present a paper, we ask you to submit a 150-word abstract outlining your topic to [email protected] by January 2nd. Please also indicate your preference about which day you would like to present. (We do our best to accommodate these preferences but we can’t make any promises!)

The Anthrosophia scholarly society also publishes a journal of the same name. Papers presented at the Anthrosophia conference may be considered for publication in this journal, though we also accept unrelated submissions. For more information about the Anthrosophia conference and the journal, please visit http: //www.cherscience.org.

 

Conference Program Committee: Drew Chastain (co-chair), Loyola University New Orleans; Grant S. McCall (co-chair), C.H.E.R. and Tulane University; Karl Widerquist, Georgetown University SFS-Qatar; Enzo Rossi, University of Amsterdam

Any questions about the conference should be directed to [email protected]

 

 

Registration:

Student/unemployed registration:                 $25

Junior professional registration:                    $50 (Postdocs, Assistant Professors, etc.)

Senior professional registration:                   $100 (Associate and Full Professors, etc.)

 

*We ask that all conference participants remit registration fees as stated above. If these fees are a hardship and might prevent you from participating, please email [email protected] to request a reduction.

Mar
16
Fri
2018 National Humanities Conference Call for Proposals is Now Available
Mar 16 all-day

We are pleased to announce that the Call for Proposals for the 2018 National Humanities Conference is now available! The conference, to be held November 8-11, 2018 in New Orleans, in conjunction with the city’s tricentennial celebration.

Click here for the Call for Proposals. We welcome proposals for sessions, individual lightning talks, and working groups.

The National Humanities Conference brings together the public humanities and academia to explore opportunities and challenges, learn about collaborations and best practices, and strengthen America’s humanities network.The National Humanities Conference is co-hosted by the National Humanities Alliance and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. To learn more about the conference, click here.

We encourage you to submit proposals and recruit others to do the same! Please contact Beatrice Gurwitz at [email protected] with any questions or for support in building sessions.

Registration is open for NHA Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day

Help us build on last year’s momentum and push for funding increases for the National Endowment for the Humanities and other federal funding streams.

Register today for the 2018 National Humanities Alliance Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day!

March 11-13, 2018

Washington Court Hotel and Capitol Hill

Washington, D.C.

Early registration ends January 12. Register now at a reduced rate.

Click here to learn more about the NHA Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day.

Click here to reserve a room in the conference hotel. Availability is limited.

Mar
31
Sat
2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Mar 31 all-day

2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
October 17-20, 2018
Buffalo Niagara County Convention Center
Buffalo, New York, USA

Proposal submission deadline: March 31, 2017

 

No Illusions, No Exclusions

The meeting theme, “No Illusions, No Exclusions,” is inspired by its location in Buffalo, New York, “The City of No Illusions.”

Buffalo is proudly gutsy, realistic, highly vernacular and inclusive. The city openly welcomes recent refugees, who enhance the substantial diversity brought about by its remarkable industrial heritage and legacy of Native Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) First Nations. Buffalo’s post-industrial transformation brings with it challenges of gentrification, reconfiguration of the labor force and new symbolic strategies of self-representation.

Participants in the annual meeting are encouraged to explore how, at this divisive moment in American life, folklore confronts economic and social disruptions, builds community resilience and sustains pluralism amidst threats to E Pluribus Unum.

Participants are invited to present with colleagues from other disciplines and our community collaborators in recognition of folklore as an inherently inclusive, multidisciplinary field of study. As a discipline, folklore cannot stand in isolation from other fields as it shapes and is shaped by other disciplines while endeavoring to sustain itself as an autonomous discipline. In considering folklore as both academic discipline and public practice, participants are encouraged to examine how folklore engages community members as partners, valuing local knowledge and facilitating cultural self-determination.

The 129th Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen friendships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required.

You can find more information about the meeting, including instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events, beginning February 1, 2018, at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2018AM.

 

Contact information:

Lorraine Walsh Cashman
American Folklore Society
812-856-2422
www.afsnet.org
[email protected]

Apr
27
Fri
International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics
Apr 27 all-day

International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics

On behalf of the Organization Committee, we are pleased to invite you to the International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics (ICFAEC 2018) which will be held on 27-28th April 2018 in Alanya, Turkey.

ICFAEC 2018 aims at disseminating new knowledge in the field economics and provides a forum for deliberations and exchange of knowledge among academics, organizations, and researchers. ICFAEC 2018 encourages submission of theoretical and empirical papers in the different domains of food and agricultural economics and related disciplines, within and across different levels of analysis. ICFAEC 2018 focuses on are: 

  • Food Economics
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Food Policy
  • Agricultural Management
  • Farm Management
  • Rural Development
  • Sustainable Development
  • Farming Systems
  • Agricultural Policy
  • Agribusiness
  • Socio-economic Aspects
  • Food Marketing
  • Rural & Agricultural Sociology
  • Agricultural Extension
  • Agritourism
  • Financing credits and agricultural subsidies
  • Logistics of agricultural production
  • Research and development
  • Irrigation and water management

We look forward to greeting you at the International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics (ICFAEC 2018) in Alanya, Turkey.

For more information about the conference organization, please check this web page. www.ageconalanya.com

Important Dates

Submission Deadline of Abstracts: January 20th, 2018
Notification of Acceptance/Rejection:  With in 4 weeks of submission time
Submission Deadline of Full Papers: February 20th, 2018
Deadline of Early Bird Registration: March 1sh, 2018

Best regards,

ICFAEC Oganizing Committee

Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Faculty of Business, Department of Economics and Finance, 07400 Alanya/Antalya-Turkey, Tel:+ (90) 242 518 21 21-1236, Fax : +(90) 242 518 20 25

Emails:  [email protected]

Precarity/Promises: 2018 Stanford Anthropology Graduate Conference Proposal
Apr 27 – Apr 28 all-day

Precarity/Promises:
2018 Stanford Anthropology Graduate Conference Proposal

Stanford University
April 27–28, 2018

We are told we live in precarious times. Postcolonial nation-building and post-Cold War democratization have not been one-way tickets to modernity as imagined. The ideology of limitless growth has not brought stable labor systems or economic security for the many, and instead it has brought ecological ruin that threatens everything built upon promises of stability. Yet, such promises persist. As anthropologists, how do we engage with this contradictory moment without reproducing teleological narratives of either progress or decline? Postcolonial perspectives suggest that, on the one hand, a stable future was never a promise accessible to most of the world’s population, and, on the other, such promises have taken multiple forms and stem from different genealogies. The 2018 Anthropology Graduate Conference at Stanford University invites papers that engage with differences within and across states of precarity through the figure of the promise.

Precarity has been theorized, first, as a consequence of global political economic transformations that have largely undone technologies of security and welfare (Standing 2011) and hindered the ability of workers to “transform the present by reference to a projected future” (Bourdieu 1998, 83). Second, precarity has been understood as a politically induced condition that leads to differential exposure to the vulnerabilities of life itself, rendering the more vulnerable among us susceptible to injury, suffering, neglect, and death (Butler 2009). Recent scholarship has bridged these perspectives and refashioned precarity as a site where to explore uneven encounters and unlikely alliances (Allison 2013; Berlant 2011; Stewart 2012; Tsing 2015).

Promise, on the other hand, is a concept that describes a type of contract, a mode of expectation, and an intention. Promises attempt to counteract the effects of unpredictability and vulnerability that the notion of precarity often conveys. And yet, promises are fragile, too. To the extent that promises depend on anticipated futures, they create contested grounds for articulations of truth, performances of certainty, relations of care, and various forms of speculation.

We invite graduate students to submit abstracts that can speak to the interplay between precarity and promise as applied to the following clusters of topics:

  • Social movements triggered by unfulfilled promises
  • The governance of precarious life
  • Trust, debt, and trade networks
  • Experience and sociality in contexts of uncertainty
  • Promises of science and technology
  • Informal economies and subcontracted labor
  • Environmental change and political ecologies
  • Sovereignty and violence in urban contexts


Application Deadline & Submission

Applications due:  Feb 15, 2018 (9:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time)
Notification of acceptance by:  March 1, 2018
Full papers due:  March 31, 2018
Conference:  April 27-28, 2018

Please submit a 300-word abstract with a 100-word short bio to [email protected] We welcome individual papers that address the conference theme in any geographical region. Paper presentations should be between 15 and 20 minutes long.

We are able to offer lodging to student presenters in the homes of Stanford students free of charge. We may have exceptional funding for students with unusually high travel costs. If travel costs are an issue, please still submit an abstract and specify what your cost of travel would be to the conference.

Jun
1
Fri
CFP: Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Conference
Jun 1 all-day

Association for Applied and Clinical Sociology Annual Conference, October 11-13, 2018.  Norfolk, Virginia.  Theme: “Translating Complexity into Action.”  Open to all applied social scientists, as well as those looking to use their social science skills in applied and clinical areas. Participants include: academics, policy, program and project leaders, business consultants, health care and government professionals. The meeting will be a point of mutual learning and growth among practitioners in the field and professionals challenged with building systems for human improvement. AACS has a reputation as a student-friendly conference for both undergraduates and graduate students, featuring student problem solvingpaper competitions, and mentoring opportunities. Papers, full sessions, workshops, and poster submissions welcomed. 

Proposals that address teaching with an applied focus are also invited

Professional development pre-conference (Thursday afternoon) workshops will be included in the conference registration fee.

Deadline: June 1, 2018

For more information, visit: http://www.aacsnet.net/  and explore the Conferences tab.

Jun
15
Fri
The CALA (2019) Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology
Jun 15 all-day

Following continuous requests for a Second Call, the CALA, The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, to be held in Siem Reap Cambodia, January 23-26, 2019, is now extremely pleased to announce its Second Call.

Despite that the call has been given a deadline, it may close early, should a ceiling be placed on the submission numbers, as we have already received an abundance of submissions, over 400 in the first call. Submissions have until now been high, so please excuse delays in responding to any queries.

Full Title: Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 1

Short Title: CALA 1 (2019)

Location:
Siem Reap, Cambodia

Start Date:
23-Jan-2019 – 26-Jan-2019

Contact: Professor Susan Hagadorn

Meeting Email: [email protected]

Meeting URL: http://cala2019.puc.edu.kh

Meeting Description: 

The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, The CALA 1 (2019), in Cambodia, symbolizes a significant movement forward for Linguistic Anthropology, and in problematizing current perspectives and praxis in the field of Asian Linguistic Anthropology.

The CALA seeks to respond to concerns by those within respective fields, Linguistics, Anthropology, Sociolinguistics, Sociology, Cultural studies, and of course Linguistic Anthropology These concerns include the reduced (opportunity for) focus on Asian regions and work by Asian academics, largely contributable to issues of funding and expertise. These concerns also include that academics globally seek to both work on Asian regions and with Asian regions, but impeded by the absence of appropriate networks.

The CALA 1 thus aims to begin an era within which to opportune these academics to transfer knowledge, expertise, and valuable Linguistic and Anthropological Data across the world, through the interpersonal and inter-institutional networks the CALA conferences seek to build.

To ground these efforts, the Conference, at The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia at the centre, seeks to network a growing number of Institutions globally, to support this much needed project.

The theme for the inaugural CALA is ‘Revitalization and Representation‘, a theme pertinent to the current state of many Asian regions and countries vis-a-vis their global analogues.

Emerging from a complex weaving for received and produced colonializations, the languages and ethnicities within Asia have experienced strong curtailment and denigration, to the point where many have reached near extinction, while others have passed the point of extinction. Here, these languages and ethnicities require urgent revitalization through an anthropological set of approaches, in collaboration with academic, and non-academic, networks globally. Revitalization can be engendered effectively through the complex channels associated with and effected through the extensive and vast work developed in Representation. Cambodia seems to be at the centre of this need for focus, with many ethnicities and their languages currently on the brink of extinction, and with several now having less than ten living speakers.

Though The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia will host the Inaugural conference in 2019, in Siem Reap, the conference will be hosted by a different Institution globally, annually, while Paññāsāstra remains at the helm of the Conference, so to collaborate with all institutions wishing to involve themselves with and in the CALA network.

We thus welcome you to the CALA 1, in 2019, the Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, and to the CALA in general.

Important dates:

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Opens: Friday, October 13, 2017 at midnight (UTC Time)
Closes: Monday, February 9, 2018 at midnight (UTC Time)
________________________________

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE

By March 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
________________________________

REGISTRATION

Early Bird
Opens: February 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: May 14, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Normal Bird
Opens: May 15, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: August 25, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Late Bird
Opens: August 26, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: January 26, 2019, (Conference end)
________________________________

CONFERENCE DATES

Wednesday January 23rd, 2019
Thursday January 24th, 2019
Friday January 25th, 2019
Saturday January 26th, 2019
Subfields:

  • Anthropological linguistics
  • Applied sociolinguistics
  • Cognitive Anthropology and language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Post-structuralism and language
  • Semiotics and semiology
  • Language documentation
  • General sociolinguistics
  • Language socialization
  • Social psychology of language
  • Language revitalization
  • Ethnography of communication
  • Language, community, ethnicity
  • Language, dialect, sociolect, genre
  • Nonverbal semiotics
  • Multifunctionality
  • Language and embodiment
  • Documenting language
  • Ethnographical language work
  • Language, gender, sexuality
  • Language ideologies
  • Narrative and metanarrative
  • Language and spatial and temporal frames
  • Language minorities and majorities
  • Language in real and virtual spaces

Language contact and change

Jun
30
Sat
Call for Proposals: Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life
Jun 30 all-day

Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life

ABOUT THE SERIES:

How are urban processes entangled with human experiences? In this series, scholarly monographs and edited volumes explore this question and illuminate diverse forms of such entanglement through empirically-based research. This series emphasizes anthropological approaches to the study of human life in relation to the urban. It seeks to illuminate experiences and effects of urban cultures and situate specific cases in a comparative set. By exploring the intricacies of human-urban relations, this series contributes to better understanding of the ways that humans particularly conceive of and experience nature, personhood, ethics, culture, and social life.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

To submit a manuscript for consideration by Lexington Books, please send:

  • a prospectus (see below for details)
  • a detailed table of contents
  • one or two sample chapters
  • your curriculum vitae

If you are proposing a contributed volume, please include titles, affiliations, and brief resumes for each of the contributors, as well as chapter abstracts.

The prospectus should include:

  1. A description of the book, describing the core themes, arguments, issues, goals, and/or topics of the work, what makes it unique, what questions it seeks to answer, and why you are qualified to write it. (2-5 pages)
  2. A description of your target audience (undergraduate or graduate students? scholars? professionals?).
  3. An analysis of competing or similar books (including publishers and dates), indicating distinctive and original elements of your project that set it apart from these other works.
  4. A list of courses in which your book might be used as a text or supplementary text, indicating the course level at which this book may be used.
  5. An indication of whether any part of your manuscript has been published previously, and if it is a doctoral dissertation, what changes you are proposing to prepare it for publication.
  6. The length of the manuscript either as a word count or a page count (12-point type on double-spaced 8.5”×11” pages). Will there be figures, tables, or other non-text material, and, if so, approximately how many? If the text is not complete, please still estimate its final length, not including the non-text material.
  7. If the manuscript is not complete, an estimation of when it will be finished. Is there a particular date by which you hope the book will be published (due to a historical anniversary, conference, etc.?
  8. The names of four to seven respected scholars in your field with whom you have no personal or professional relationship. Include their titles, affiliations, e-mail addresses, and/or mailing addresses.
  9. An indication of whether the manuscript is under consideration by other publishers.

Please do not send your entire manuscript.

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Jessica Bodoh-Creed is lecturer of anthropology at California State University.

Melissa King is assistant professor of anthropology at San Bernardino Valley College

Leonido Gines Jr. is lecturer of architecture at De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, and founder of studioGINES.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact: Jessica Bodoh-Creed ([email protected]), Leonido Gines Jr. ([email protected]), and Melissa King ([email protected])

Jul
26
Thu
2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society
Jul 26 – Jul 29 all-day

Call for Papers, Posters, and Organized Sessions: 2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society Portland, Oregon

July 26‐29, 2018

MEETING THEME: Science in Society, Society in Science – Toward a 21st Century Model for Social Scientific Research

Growing public skepticism about the value of science and expert knowledge has been a defining characteristic of the early 21st century. Critiques of science come from many sources – populist anti‐elite social movements, academic studies of conventional scientific methods and institutions, and advocates for a more participatory approach to knowledge production. As the distinction between ‘facts’ and ‘values’ has become blurred, the evidence‐base that informs current policy becomes increasingly contested territory. Notably, social scientists have long relied on evidence and scientific research to challenge popular misunderstandings of social problems like poverty, crime, racism, and sexism. At the same time, they have been at the forefront of critiques of the mainstream scientific enterprise and helped pioneer new approaches to research and engagement.

Professional social science societies (like RSS) have an obligation to support those who are studying and developing effective responses to the challenges faced by rural people and places in a globalized world. New models for scientific research will be increasingly important if our efforts are to inform public discourse and shape the development of effective public policies. To do this, we need to reconcile tensions between the desire to retain the power and insights of rigorous scientific methods, and our awareness of the societal biases associated with conventional scientific institutions. At the 2018 Annual Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, we particularly encourage attendees to present work that explores this vexing and enduring issue, and to provide examples of innovative approaches to applied scientific research on rural topics.

Over the last 80 years, the annual meetings of the RSS have been a venue for the exchange of ideas and information about a wide range of rural issues. Our attendees include faculty and students from diverse colleges and universities, researchers working in government or nonprofit institutions, and rural activists and practitioners. In addition to presentations on the meeting theme, we always invite presentations of research and engagement focused rural people, places and themes from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives.

Abstracts: Abstracts should be approximately 350‐500 words and briefly outline the purpose and theoretical framing of the paper, poster, program, or organized session. Where appropriate, include information about methods, data, and preliminary findings. The deadline for submitting papers, posters and sessions is Thursday, February 1, 2018, 11:59 pm (EST).

To submit, visit the “Annual Meetings” tab on the RSS website, www.ruralsociology.org.

Please contact the Program Chair, Kate MacTavish ([email protected]) or the RSS Business Office ([email protected]) with any questions about submission or to explore ideas for special events at the 2018 Annual Meeting.