Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to ancalendar@americananthro.org.

 

Sep
7
Thu
Call for Session Proposals: Twelfth International Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies
Sep 7 all-day

“Situations, Times, and Places in Hunter-Gatherer Research”

 12th International Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies (CHAGS XII) 23–27 July 2018

Convenor: Lye Tuck-Po, School of Social Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia

Organisation:INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR HUNTER GATHERER RESEARCH (ISHGR)

Hosted by: SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, UNIVERSITI SAINS MALAYSIA

The Call for Sessions is now open!

Submission by online form only: https://goo.gl/forms/ghcDs1WqHeFOCACF2.

Closing date: 7 September 2017 (11:59 PM Kuala Lumpur time)

 CHAGS conferences generate intellectual exchange, advance knowledge of the lives and times of hunter-gatherers in the past, present, and future, and have made significant contributions to anthropological theory. CHAGS X (Liverpool, 2013) and CHAGS XI (Vienna, 2015) attracted unprecedented numbers of first-timers and students interested in hunter-gatherer societies and the dynamics and conditions of their lives, and offered the promise of new disciplinary crossways, concerns, and approaches. The objective of CHAGS XII is to push this momentum forward and to expand the social spaces of knowledge sharing and production. We aim to cultivate not just diversity in concept-building but good practices of working with and relating to hunter-gatherers.

As with previous conferences, the scope of CHAGS XII is broadly global and its perspective is towards the long-term. We welcome proposals for sessions that seek ways to go beyond geographical and disciplinary specialisms, and that promote new pathways of knowledge production. We invite participants to reflect on “situations, times, and places” whether integratively (as a springboard for general theoretical reflections on their interconnections) or separately (as discrete themes and topics), and to examine the intersections of time and place with fieldwork and theorising across the many concerns of hunter-gatherer research. This last will include the time-space compressions of the digital age, which are changing everyday experiences everywhere.

Sep
30
Sat
DADA Rivista di Antropologia post-globale CFP
Sep 30 all-day

DADA Rivista di Antropologia post-globale is a platform for scientific and academic discussion and critique. It  focuses on the contemporary analysis of  the post-global world. It is a multilingual and multidisciplinary online journal, which publishes contributions in anthropology, sociology, political science, philosophy and economics. Researchers and young scholars can submit their articles, papers and reviews in several languages, such as English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. DADA Rivista  is double blind peer-reviewed and open source, free of charge for readers, authors and institutions. It has biannual issues and special issues. Current call for papers concerning the special issues are the following: On“Conflict and Violence” (the deadline is June 30, 2017) and on “Debt and gift” (the deadline is September 30, 2017).  Please submit your contributions online.

VISTAS: 39th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association CFP
Sep 30 all-day

VISTAS: 39th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association
Philadelphia, March 15-18, 2018
Keynote: Elizabeth Milroy (Drexel University)

In honor of the 100th anniversary of Philadelphia’s Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the NCSA committee invites proposals that explore the notion of the vista in the nineteenth century. From personal gardens to public parks, from the street level to the top of a skyscraper, or from the microscope to the panoramic photograph, the nineteenth century was a moment when the idea of the vista changed from a narrow sightline to a sweeping, expansive view. How did theorists alter our historical perspective, broadening our notion of the world through science or religion? In what ways did power systems affect urban vantage points? How did man-made vistas reflect socio-cultural ideals? How did domestic spaces or nightlife transform with the widespread use of gas or electric lighting? How does the conceptual vista operate metaphorically? Topics might include horticulture, landscapes and seascapes, new technology, photography, sightseeing, film and the theater, urban planning, visions and dreamscapes, shifting perceptions of the gaze, or literary or artistic descriptions or depictions of viewpoints. In contrast, papers may consider the absence of vistas, such as mental or physical confinement or elements that obfuscate a view.

Please send 250-word abstracts with one-page CVs to ncsaphila2018@gmail.com by September 30th, 2017. Abstracts should include the author’s name, institutional affiliation, and paper title in the heading. We welcome individual proposals and panel proposals with four presenters and a moderator. Note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend if accepted. Presenters will be notified in November 2017. We encourage submissions from graduate students, and those whose proposals have been accepted may submit complete papers to apply for a travel grant to help cover transportation and lodging expenses. Scholars who reside outside of North America and whose proposals have been accepted may submit a full paper to be considered for the International Scholar Travel Grant (see the NCSA website for additional requirements: http://www.ncsaweb.net).

Oct
1
Sun
Call For Papers: Linguistic Justice and Analytic Philosophy
Oct 1 all-day

Special issue of Philosophical Papers

Guest Editors: Filippo Contesi (Jean Nicod), Moti Mizrahi (Florida Tech) and Enrico Terrone (Turin)

Expected contributors include Eric Schwitzgebel (University of California, Riverside), Hans-Johann Glock (Zurich), Elisabetta Galeotti (Eastern Piedmont) and Eric Schliesser (Amsterdam)

The topics of linguistic discrimination and linguistic justice have received little attention from contemporary analytic philosophers despite the fact that there is a growing body of evidence in linguistics and social psychology about implicit negative biases towards speakers and writers perceived as non-native. In fact, issues of linguistic discrimination and justice are particularly urgent in analytic philosophy because English is undoubtedly the lingua francaof contemporary analytic philosophy. For this reason, it is important to think about what it means to be a person for whom English is not a first language and who tries to participate in the academic life of contemporary analytic philosophy.

The aim of this special issue of Philosophical Papers is to consider the circumstances of being a non-native speaker and writer of English in analytic philosophy. In addition to philosophical and meta-philosophical perspectives, we also encourage submissions from different approaches and disciplines, including psychology, linguistics and the social sciences.

Possible questions for discussion include (but are by no means limited to):

  • Is there linguistic discrimination or injustice in analytic philosophy? If so, what should we do about it?
  • Are the percentages of non-native-speaker faculty members of the most reputable analytic philosophy departments comparable to those in arts and humanities and STEM departments? What should any differences teach us?
  • How can diversity of native languages and cultures be beneficial, if at all, to analytic philosophy?
  • Are perceived linguistic fluency and eloquence important factors in philosophical writing and presenting? Should they be?
  • Is it true, as is sometimes claimed, that publishing philosophical work in the most reputable venues in contemporary analytic philosophy only requires linguistic competence of a level that is reasonably easy for a non-native writer to achieve?
  • Should English (or any other language) be the lingua franca of contemporary analytic philosophy?
  • Should study and research in analytic philosophy be a global and cosmopolitan enterprise?
  • What if any extra policies can or should professional journals or institutions adopt to address any specific difficulties faced by non-native speakers and writers?
  • Are there any precedents in the history of intellectual communities, including contemporary ones and those in different philosophical traditions, that can provide a useful model of how to approach linguistic justice issues in analytic philosophy?
  • How do linguistic justice issues intersect with issues of race, ethnicity or nationality (or other issues)? How important are such intersections (or lack thereof)?

The deadline for receipt of submissions is 1 October, 2017. This issue of Philosophical Papers, comprising both invited and submitted articles, will appear in March 2018.

Authors should submit manuscripts electronically, as a PDF or MS Word document attachment, to the Managing Editor of Philosophical Papers
at Philosophical.Papers@ru.ac.za. Authors must include their full name, affiliation, and address for email correspondence with their submission.

Further inquiries may be addressed to Filippo Contesi (filippo.contesi@york.ac.uk) or Ward Jones (w.jones@ru.ac.za).

http://contesi.wordpress.com/cfp

Oct
2
Mon
CFP: Asia and the Anthropocene
Oct 2 all-day

Call for Papers

“Asia and the Anthropocene”

The Association for Asian Studies is pleased to invite applications to participate in the second of three workshops in its series “Emerging Fields in the Study of Asia” supported by the Luce Foundation. The second workshop, “Asia and the Anthropocene,” will take place August 23–27, 2018 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

The purpose of this gathering is to explore the emerging concept of the Anthropocene through shared readings and collective conversations about how scholars of Asia might best respond to the scientific proposal of a new geological epoch. The selection committee seeks bold ideas and broadly framed research papers that grapple with the challenges posed by this new understanding of planetary conditions. Participants will present short papers (20-30 pages, double spaced, including notes) designed to further this new field of study, leaving ample time for discussion. We will also read and discuss certain key texts that are relevant to this emerging field. The workshop will include a field trip to a location to be determined.

The goal of this workshop is to explore a range of ways in which scholars in non-science fields might draw on their regional expertise to engage with the dramatic paradigm shift that sees human beings as a planet-changing species. We welcome a broad range of participants to this workshop but are especially interested in scholars early in their careers (including doctoral students) and scholars based in Asia. Participation will be limited to a maximum of 12 people plus members of the planning committee. While AAS membership is not required for application, if accepted to the workshop participants must become members of the Association for Asian Studies. Papers presented at the workshop may be selected for presentation at a panel at the annual meeting of the AAS and/or for publication (subject to peer review) in a leading journal in the field of Asian Studies.

Definition of the Anthropocene

The concept of the Anthropocene arose among Earth System scientists, explicitly as a geological term, to describe the unprecedented anthropogenic transformation of the Earth System. It can be measured in three complementary ways—through the “planetary boundaries” concept proposed by Johan Rockström and colleagues, the “great acceleration” proposed by Will Steffen and colleagues, and, most explicitly, through the planetary stratum (GSSP) marking the shift from the Holocene Epoch, which is now under consideration by the Anthropocene Working Group. While human beings have always been biological and ecological agents transforming our environment, for the first time ever our species has become a geological force irreversibly altering the Earth System and thus changing the conditions for all living organisms. The date proposed by the scientific community for this rupture is the mid-twentieth century. The challenge for Asianists in non-science disciplines is threefold: to understand this science, to grapple with what the Anthropocene means for Asia, and to explore what it means for our various disciplines.

Issues of the Anthropocene for Scholars of Asia

This proposed new geological epoch has many ramifications for the study of Asia and there is, so far, little consensus about how humanists and social scientists in Asian studies should respond.  But, undoubtedly, thinking about Asia is essential for thinking about the Anthropocene because of its sheer weight—in geographical size and population—in world affairs. This workshop seeks to refocus the exclusively Eurocentric lens through which the Anthropocene is often understood by non-scientists.

Among the topics of interest, although certainly not limited to these, are the following questions:

(1) How does understanding the Anthropocene as the result of collective human forces change the relationship between the sciences, on the one hand, and the humanities and social sciences on the other? Some have argued that since human and natural forces have merged, the natural sciences and human-centered studies should merge, while other scholars promote disciplinary pluralism.

(2) What political, social, and economic forces have led to the Anthropocene? Among the answers currently proposed are inequality, industrialization, developmentalism, capitalism, imperialism, globalization, and population growth.

(3) When did these forces emerge and/or become unstoppable? Some point to such things as the invention of fire, agriculture, or industrialization; still others emphasize contingent developments either in the distant past or more recently. Each framing creates a different understanding not only of the origins of the Anthropocene and Asia’s relation to it but also of our capacity to mitigate its effects.

(4) Which cultural, religious, and intellectual constructs have led to the overshoot of earth systems, and which might help us to meet the challenge of our changed conditions?

(5) Are there new forms of community, politics, and economic activity in Asia that might bring hope through adaptation and resilience?

Cost

The summer workshop is supported by a generous grant from the Luce Foundation. Expenses for travel, room, and board will be covered for all participants for the duration of the workshop.

How to Apply

Scholars wishing to participate in the 2018 summer workshop are asked to submit via email an abstract of no more than two pages (single-spaced, 12 point font), accompanied by a CV of no more than two pages to AAS Executive Director Michael Paschal at mpaschal@asian-studies.org. In addition to a short description of the specific issues to be addressed in the proposed paper, the abstract should explain how these issues speak to the larger question of Asia and the Anthropocene.

Applications will be reviewed by a panel of senior scholars who have agreed to act as mentors for the workshop. Questions about the application process or administrative matters should be directed to Michael Paschal at the address listed above. Questions about topic suitability or other substantive issues may be addressed to the organizer, Arjun Guneratne, at guneratne@macalester.edu.

The deadline for applications is October 2, 2017. Successful applicants will be notified by November 6.

Oct
16
Mon
CFP: Auburn University at Montgomery (AUM) Southern Studies Conference
Oct 16 all-day

Now in its tenth year, the Auburn University at Montgomery (AUM) Southern Studies Conference invites proposals for preformed panels or individual papers on any topic pertaining to the history and culture of the American South from any time period, including presentations on art practice, American history, the history of science and medicine, the history of art, anthropology, history of music, foodways studies, theater, literature, and sociology. 

Proposals should be emailed to southernstudies@aum.edu and include a 250-word abstract and a brief CV. The deadline for proposals is October 16, 2017. For more information, please visit the conference website: http://www.cas.aum.edu/community-resources/southern-studies-conference