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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Dec
20
Thu
CFP: SAC 38th Annual Conference
Dec 20 all-day

AOC CALL FOR PAPERS

SAC 38th Annual Conference

March 28th—30th, 2019

McMenamins Edgefield Resort Portland, Oregon

We live in dynamic times, witnessing tectonic shifts in our society and the world. Globally, social change and unrest seem to be accelerating and this monumental change has enormous implications for the focus and practice of anthropology, especially the anthropology of consciousness. The 2019 theme for the 38th annual Anthropology of Consciousness conference centers on the relationship between consciousness and social change. We seek to engage contemporary events, exploring the implications for humanity.

How can our understanding of consciousness and human transformation be made relevant, with the aim of a praxis to catalyze a shift toward a more just world? What are the subaltern and scholarly responses to the tribal politics and factionalism we are experiencing? What positive outcomes are emerging? These are hot topics, and we will face them head on as we return to the inclusive McMenamins Edgefield Resort — a place that we all hold dear and now call an organizational home. We invite you to join our inter and transdisciplinary community of practice. AoC is unique in its cultural approach to consciousness, openly and critically exploring consciousness as it is understood and shaped across time and cultures.

We invite papers, panel proposals and workshops on topics including but not exclusive to the following sub-themes:

• Transdisciplinary dialogue on the changes happening around us and their implications
• The impact of migration on social movements and social consciousness
• Empowering change makers with traditional wisdom practices
• The new feminine & women’s movement into political power
• Militarization, globalization and the role of anthropology in helping to shape a more connected and integrated world
• New social movements and perspectives that once again challenge the line between emic and etic anthropological practices and how consciousness studies can help us to bridge the divide between the two
• Voices of youth and subaltern
• The dynamic interplay between compassion and fear
• Social justice or the lack thereof
• The new state order and re/deconstruction of truth
• Ways to engage and enact social change

 

Workshops & Experientials

AoC also invites submission of artistic works and experiential workshops exploring or cultivating consciousness. We aim to build bridges across scholastic and creative communities, as as well provide opportunities for personal and professional growth.

Workshops are free for all registered presenters, and are open to single-day attendees for a nominal fee. Workshop leaders will receive a 100% discount on conference registration fees.

 

Instructions

Proposals for individual papers, panels, workshops and special events should be submitted by Dec 20th, 2018 to [email protected]. Presenters then need to create a user account and register on the AAA website, after which they can upload abstracts to be included in the conference program. Non-presenting attendees can register through the AAA system, on-site, or via our Meetup.com website. Links and clarifying instructions will be provided shortly on our website, www.sacaaa.org.

If your paper is not accepted, you may request a refund of your registration fees. Acceptance notifications will be sent by the end of January, 2019.

Limit: one paper or presentation per person, unless prior approval has been obtained from the Program Chair. Session organizers may submit individual papers for inclusion in their sessions. Please indicate whether you will require audio-visual equipment for your presentation. A projector, screen and laptop will be made available.

 

Hotel Registration

The 2019 conference will be held at the beautiful McMenamins Edgefield Resort in Portland Oregon.

Address: 2126 S.W. Halsey St, Troutdale, OR, 97060 Phone: (800) 669-8610

McMenamins has a wide variety of rooms available that can suit any budget.
Please contact the reservation desk and mention that you are with AoC (or the American Anthropological Association) to receive a special room rate. https://reserve.mcmenamins.com/hotels

Questions? Please contact the Program Chair Bryan Rill at [email protected]

Dec
31
Mon
Call for Papers: Rurality and Future-Making
Dec 31 all-day

Rurality and Future-Making: Comparative Perspectives from Europe, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean 
May 24–25, 2019
NSG, University of Cologne (organized jointly by the following Regional Working Groups of the German Anthropological Association (GAA) – RG Europe, RG Middle East and RG Mediterranean)

 

 

Submission Deadline: 31.12.2018 

The conference language will be English.

If you are interested to present a paper, please send an Abstract (200-300 words) to [email protected] by December 31, 2018.

We are planning to publish the proceedings of the conference in an edited volume.

 

To facilitate the process, please adhere to the following deadlines:

  • Dec 31st, 2018 – deadline for the submission of abstracts (200-300 words)
  • Jan 31st, 2019 – notification of acceptance
  • May 22-24th, 2019 – Conference
  • Oct 31st, 2019 – deadline for the submission of papers (10.000-12.000 words)

 

Conveners:

  • GAA Regional Working Group Europe:
  • Jelena Tošić (St. Gallen/Vienna), Andreas Streinzer (Frankfurt/Vienna) GAA Regional Working Group Middle East:
  • Katharina Lange (Berlin)
  • GAA Regional Working Group Mediterranean:
  • Michaela Schäuble (Bern), Martin Zillinger (Cologne)
  • Organizers: Simon Holdermann (Cologne), Christoph Lange (Cologne)

Contact: [email protected]

 

This conference brings together three GAA regional working groups – Anthropology of Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean – to explore rurality as a reserve and resource for future-making in their interconnected and transnational regionalities. It invites participants to explore situated practices of future-making in order to trace how rurality is achieved, marked and (de-)stabilized in different places. Through concrete ethnographic case studies, we aim at conceptualizing the ‘rural’ beyond wellknown center-periphery dichotomies. Well aware that ‘the rural’ and ‘the urban’ can only be “understood as a continuum irreducible to the polarity of one or the other term” (Chio 2017:362); we use the rural lens to create an anthropological laboratory (Albera 1999) which enables us to “write against established categories” (Horden 2014:9). This conference invites researchers to reflect on the various perpetuated methodological urbanisms, ruralisms and regionalisms, i.e. the persisting preoccupation of ethnographers with urban spaces and research in geographically and/ or politically bounded categories like Europe, the Middle East and the Mediterranean. Most of these categories contribute to the construction of our methodological iron cage as Wimmer and Glick-Schiller pointed out in the term methodological nationalism (2002:302). With the focus on rurality as an anthropological laboratory and lens, we aim to challenge earlier essentialist approaches and at the same time emphasize its contradictory and thus productive potential.

While overall, the rural population may be on the decline, it may well increase in absolute numbers in specific places. And while rural population may predominantly rely on agriculture for a living, in various regions its share of GDP is diminishing. Poverty remains particularly pronounced in rural regions. In North Africa, this becomes evident in the inadequate access to education, health services, electricity or clean water (Barnes 2014). Moreover, the demographic exodus out of vast rural areas in parts of Southern Europe challenges not only individual but also communal lives as well as national political agendas. Nevertheless, grand visions of future-making by politicians and entrepreneurs remain geared towards rural regions – whether it be in terms of large-scale agricultural projects for the continuous fragile and fragmented landscapes of the Mediterranean, irrigation and electrification schemes for the exploitation of its natural resources, or in the form of touristic development agencies for purported isolated areas. Also, in various countries along the Mediterranean shorelines, governments continue to rely on networks and patronage systems in the rural hinterlands as its basis of power.

But rurality is not only played out as a resource for large scale politics of modernization, it can also be used as a socio-ecological reserve that people maintain to diversify their opportunities and resources in times of crises. Large-scale modernization schemes and their risks are thus mitigated by individual strategies to provide for alternative options and material foundations in case of failure. One de-centered perspective on rurality is Hauschild’s emphasis on the rural hinterland as material and political reserve which encompasses various available resources to ensure, expand and delimit agency (Hauschild 2008:217f.).

For a long time, Eastern and Southern Europe, the Mediterranean as well as the Middle East have been approached by their presupposed outstanding rural character in anthropological inquiry; like the notorious ‘honor-and-shame’ complex, ‘the rural’ can be seen as a “gatekeeping concept” for anthropologists who had been working in these areas (Appadurai 1986:357). This is apparently present in classical anthropological studies on ‘Mediterranean countrymen’ (Pitt-Rivers 1963, Davis 1977) as well as in the rich corpus of peasant studies from Southern Europe to the Middle East – a body of research and literature that has provided essential impulses in the formation of anthropological theory.

Arguably, anthropological research in recent decades has shifted away from the countryside to the metropoles, predominately exploring the rural through the lens of the urban, bureaucratic elites, cultural entrepreneurs and tourists’ promises (Deeb/Winnegar 2012:539). Against this background we want to promote a symmetrical anthropology of the rural, which opens up new perspectives for research.

Finally, we invite scholars to expand and multiply Horden and Purcell’s (2000) perspective on the Mediterranean to Europe as a whole and the Middle East. Their emphasis on the ruptures and connectivities of “human micro-ecologies” (Horden 2012: 28) pervading the karst landscapes of the Mediterranean and encompassing Southern Europe, parts of the Middle East and North Africa, can help us comparatively zoom in on webs of microregions in which rurality takes on different forms and meaning and is played out differently at different locales.

Research topics and questions for the conference may entail:

  • How and for whom does the rural/hinterland/landscape figure to be a meaningful space of social relations and livelihoods?
  • The ‘rural’ as backdrop for processes of globalization or the recursive rural impact on globalization
  • What are spatial and power implications of the Mediterranean as an imaginary category?
  • What are the perceptions of “rural Europe” and what kind of histories and future-making imaginaries do they imply?
  • The ‘mediatized Mediterranean’: rurality, infrastructures and media
  • How can we conceptualize local/global, rural/urban and periphery/center binaries in a more productive way?
  • The ‘rural’ in development practice and discourse and in changing modernization narratives
  • Migration and other rural (im-)mobilities?
  • Rurality, Scale and Migration
  • Rethinking the ‘rural’ with reference to Horden/Purcell’s historical ecology and its defining features of rupture and connectivity
  • The ‘rural’ as cultural identity and heritage – the entrepreneurial potential and imaginary for ‘the touristic gaze’

References:

Albera, Dionigi (1999): The Mediterranean as an anthropological laboratory, Anales de la Fundacion Joaquín Costa 16, 215-232.

Appadurai, Arjun (1986): Theory in Anthropology: Center and Periphery, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 28(2), 56-361.

Barnes, Jessica (2014): Cultivating the Nile The Everyday Politics of Water in Egypt. Durham: Duke University Press.

Chio, Jenny (2017): “Introduction: Rural as space and sociality.” Critique of Anthropology 37 (4):361-363.

Hauschild, Thomas (2008): Ritual und Gewalt: Ethnologische Studien an europäischen und mediterranen Gesellschaften. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Horden, P. (2014): Introduction. A companion to Mediterranean history. P. Horden and S. Kinoshita.

Chichester, Wiley-Blackwell: 1-6.

Horden, P. (2012): Situations Both Alike? Connectivity, the Mediterranean, the Sahara. Saharan frontiers space and mobility in Northwest Africa. J. McDougall and J. Scheele. Bloomington, Indiana University Press: 25-38.

Horden, Peregrine and Purcell, Nicholas (2000): The Corrupting Sea: A Study of Mediterranean history. Oxford: Blackwell.

Deeb, Lara and Winegar, Jessica (2012): Anthropologies of Arab-Majority Societies, Annual Review of Anthropology, (41), 537-58.

Davis, John (1977): People of the Mediterranean: An Essay in Comparative Social Anthropology Pitt-Rivers, Julian (1968): Mediterranean countrymen: Essays in the Social Anthropology of the Mediterranean, Paris: Mouton.

Wimmer, Andreas, and Nina Glick Schiller (2002): “Methodological nationalism and beyond: nation– state building, migration and the social sciences.” Global Networks 2 (4):301-334.

Jan
10
Thu
Evolution of Tradition: Interrogating Transformations in Traditional Folk and Performing Arts
Jan 10 – Jan 11 all-day

EVOLUTION OF TRADITION: INTERROGATING TRANSFORMATIONS IN TRADITIONAL FOLK AND PERFORMING ARTS.

KOLKATA, INDIA, JANUARY 10–11, 2019

Center for Knowledge ideas and Development Studies.

Proposals due JUNE 30. Find information at the top of the page at this link: http://www.knids.org/events-and-activities

Jan
24
Thu
International Conference: Peoples and Cultures of the World  @ Palermo University
Jan 24 – Jan 26 all-day

Call for papers: Peoples and Cultures of the World 

International Conference
Palermo University, January 24-25, 2019
Building 19, Viale delle Scienze, Aula Seminari A and B

Deadline for submitting proposals: 30 November 2018

Abstract: 250 words (max)
Duration of each paper: 20 minutes
Official languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish

Registration to the Conference is free of cost. Travel, accommodation and food costs are to be covered by participants.

Scientific coordination:
Leonardo Mercatanti and Stefano Montes

Organizing committee:
Irene Majo Garigliano, Leonardo Mercatanti, Giovanni Messina, Stefano Montes, Alessandro Morello, Gaetano Sabato, Flavia Schiavo, Licia Taverna

Administration:
Department of Cultures and Societies, Palermo University
Viale delle Scienze, 90128, Palermo, Italy

Please send your paper and short biodata to:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Information:
Leonardo Mercatanti ([email protected])
Stefano Montes ([email protected])
Gaetano Sabato ([email protected])

Feb
15
Fri
2019 German Studies Association Call for Proposals
Feb 15 all-day

2019 German Studies Association Call for Proposals

GSA 2019 German Studies Association

GERMAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE

The German Studies Association (GSA) will hold its 43rd Annual Conference from 3 to 6 October 2019 at the Hilton Portland Downtown in Portland, Oregon (USA).

The Program Committee cordially invites proposals on any aspect of German, Austrian, or Swiss studies, including (but not limited to) history, Germanistik, film, art history, political science, anthropology, musicology, religious studies, sociology, and cultural studies.

Proposals for entire sessions, for interdisciplinary presentations, and for series of panels are strongly encouraged (though we discourage thematic series of more than four panels).  Individual paper proposals are also welcome. The call for seminar proposals has been distributed separately.

Please see the GSA website for information about the submission process for ‘traditional’ papers, sessions, and roundtables, which will open on 5 January 2019. The deadline for proposals is 15 February 2019.

Please note that all proposed presenters must be members of the German Studies Association. Information on membership is available on the GSA website (www.thegsa.org).

In order to avoid complications later, the Program Committee would like to reiterate two extremely important guidelines here (the full list of guidelines is available on the GSA website):

 

  1. No individual at the GSA conference may give more than one paper or appear on the program in more than two separate roles. (Participating in a seminar counts as delivering a paper.)
  2. If a paper proposal requires high quality sound equipment, that justification must be made in detail at the time of submission.

 

For more information, visit the GSA website, where previous conference programs and a detailed list of submission guidelines may be found (www.thegsa.org), or contact members of the 2019 Program Committee:

https://www.thegsa.org/conference/program-committee-2019

25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

Mar
15
Fri
The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019
Mar 15 all-day

The Conference on Mediterranean Linguistic Anthropology 2019

Bounded languages, Unbounded

The politics of identity remain central to the mediation of language change. Here, boundaries rise and fall, thus motivating the ephemeral nature of community. The Mediterranean region is one replete with histories and power struggles, clearly demarcating nation, community, and ethnicity. Identities, language ideologies, and the languages themselves, have sought boundedness, dynamics which have indeed sought change over eons, through demographic and geographic movements, through geopolitics, through technological innovation. In a current era of technological advancement, transnational fluidity, intellectual power, capitalism, and new sexualities, we question, once again, the boundedness of language and identity, and ways in which to unbound languages and ideologies. However, mroe than before, we now increasingly require anthropological toil, so to innovative ways to locate these ideologies and their fluid boundaries, actively. We now then need to unbound these languages, and their ideologies, so to arrive at progressive realizations, and to rectify, or at least see past, the segregations of old.

The theme for the COMELA 2019,

Bounded languages, Unbounded

encapsulates an ongoing struggle throughout Mediterranean regions. The continuous tension between demarcation, yet concurrent legitimization, of languages, language ideologies, and language identities, has now entered an era where new modes of interactivity require language communities to take on roles superordinate to the past, and where flexible citizenship now operates within, and not only across, language communities.

For more information about the CFP, please visit the website.

 

Abstract and poster proposal submission

Opens: August 13, 2018 at midnight (CET Time)
Closes: January 25, 2019 at midnight (CET Time)

CFP: Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies
Mar 15 all-day

Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies is a flightless, multi-site conference that invites interdisciplinary attention to confluences between environmental and religious perspectives and practices in the long Anglophone nineteenth century (1780-1900). The conference will be broadcast online from four participating sites:

• Armstrong Browning Library at Baylor University (Texas)
• Lancaster University (UK)
• University of Washington (Seattle)
• Georgetown University (Washington, D.C.)

This conference calls for attention both to earlier religious environmental consciousness and to the environmental impact of our scholarship today. According to TerraPass, air travel for an average international conference generates roughly 100 metric tons (mT) of carbon dioxide equivalents, the same greenhouse-gas impact as consuming 11,252 gallons of gasoline, burning 109,409 pounds of coal, or driving 245,098 miles in a passenger vehicle. In addition to avoiding air travel, we hope to lower barriers of cost and transportation, thereby enabling a more diverse and inclusive range of participation than is often possible at international conferences.

Rather than seeking to replace physical with digital networking, this conference will take a hybrid approach by linking several international sites. Events will be live-streamed on a shared conference website, where, after the conference dates, they will also be recorded for future access.

The Call for Papers is available on the Ecology and Religion in 19th Century Studies conference site: baylor.edu/library/ecologyreligion. I encourage you to visit the site and submit a proposal for a paper or panel session. I look forward to your submission and to our engagement with one another through this new way of conferencing.

Apr
10
Wed
Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges 2019 Meeting
Apr 10 – Apr 13 all-day

Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC) Bi-annual National Conference

April 10-13, 2019

 

Metropolitan State University of Denver
890 Auraria Parkway
Denver, Colorado 80204

 

Please join us for this exciting national conference of the Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges at the Metropolitan State University of Denver, Colorado. The conference will be hosted by President-Elect, Evin Rodkey of Muskegon Community College, Michigan ([email protected]).

Our bi-annual SACC-fest offers attendees a great opportunity to learn about SACC, network with new friends and contacts, acquire new skills and teaching tips, and enhance awareness of what is happening in other anthropology departments.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Please consider both attending and presenting at this conference. If you have ideas about teaching, a favorite lesson plan or teaching strategy, we want to hear from you! If you would like to discuss current issues facing faculty or departments or have resources that you would like to share, let us know! And, if you have a student project, club or other activities to share, bring your students and let them inspire us!

Paper presentations are tentatively scheduled for 15 minutes. If you would like to organize a discussion, or give a demonstration of a teaching method or assignment we can schedule a longer period. Abstracts should be no longer than 125 words. Call for papers will be announced soon.

 

REGISTRATION

You will be able to register for the conference after January 15, 2019 (est.). All registration will be handled by the AAA on their website http://www.americananthro.org/.


HOTEL

The conference hotel with a block of rooms will be the Springhill Suites by Marriott, 1190 Auraria Parkway, Denver CO. The hotel is very close to the university. https://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/densd-springhill-suites-denver-downtown/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy9qXwu6I3QIV1YTVCh0JGgVvEAAYASAAEgJu5vD_BwE

About SACC: SACC is a network of people who teach anthropology. A section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), SACC was founded in 1978 to encourage dialogue, collaboration and excellence in the teaching of anthropology. Visit us on the web at http://sacc.americananthro.org/.