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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Oct
17
Wed
2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society @ Buffalo Niagara County Convention Center
Oct 17 – Oct 20 all-day

The 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society

October 17-20, 2018

Buffalo Niagara County Convention Center
Buffalo, New York, USA

No Illusions, No Exclusions

“No Illusions, No Exclusions,” the theme for the 2018 AFS Annual Meeting, is inspired by its location in Buffalo, New York, “The City of No Illusions.”

Buffalo is proudly gutsy, realistic, highly vernacular and inclusive. The city openly welcomes recent refugees, who enhance the substantial diversity brought about by its remarkable industrial heritage and legacy of Native Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) First Nations. Buffalo’s post-industrial transformation brings with it challenges of gentrification, reconfiguration of the labor force and new symbolic strategies of self- representation.

Participants in the annual meeting are encouraged to explore how at this divisive moment in American life, folklore confronts economic and social disruptions, builds community resilience and sustains pluralism amidst threats to E Pluribus Unum.

As a discipline, folklore cannot stand in isolation from other fields as it shapes and is shaped by other disciplines while endeavoring to sustain itself as an autonomous discipline. In considering folklore as both academic discipline and public practice, participants are encouraged to examine how folklore engages community members as partners, valuing local knowledge and facilitating cultural self-determination.

 

Learn more about the meeting at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2018AM.

 

We invite students and colleagues from Buffalo to join us; no registration fee required. We ask that you sign in at the registration desk, then sample, circulate, introduce yourselves, and learn more about folklore as a profession and a perspective.

 

Contact info:          Lorraine Walsh Cashman

812-856-2422

[email protected]

Oct
18
Thu
African American Digital Humanities 2018
Oct 18 – Oct 20 all-day

Intentionally Digital. Intentionally Black.
African American Digital Humanities 2018
University of Maryland
October 18-20, 2018

Call for Proposals
What happens to digital humanities inquiry when we begin with Black culture, Black thought, and Black persons at the center of our endeavors? How does this shift challenge and expand both the humanities and the digital? What happens to Black and African American humanities research when we lead with the digital?

Interdisciplinary inquiry into both the online practices of black users and humanities research focused on black history and culture using digital tools has expanded in the past decade. Too often, this work happens on the margins of established disciplines, boundaries, and paradigms. Rather than arriving at black digital research as an afterthought or a tactic to achieve “diversity”, privileging black theory and black culture in our scholarship can provide alternate paradigms through which to understand the digital and the humanistic.

The first national conference of the African American Digital Humanities (AADHum) Initiative atthe University of Maryland will explore how digital studies and digital humanities-based research, teaching, and community projects can center African American history and culture. AADHum invites submissions that may include scholarly inquiry into Black diasporic and African American uses of digital technologies; digital humanities projects that focus on black history and culture; race and digital theory; the intersection of black studies and digital humanities; information studies, cultural heritage, and community-based digital projects; pedagogical interventions; digital tools and artifacts; black digital humanities and memory; social media and black activism/movements, etc.

Proposal Submissions
We invite submissions from within and outside the academy – students, faculty, librarians, independent scholars and community members – to actively participate in the conference! Proposals are due by April 9, 2018.

• Proposals should be submitted online at https://www.conftool.pro/aadhum2018/
• Multiple proposal submissions (maximum of 3 submissions) from an individual or group are acceptable
• Selections and notifications will be made by mid-June 2018

Types of Proposals
· Individual papers. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words and brief bio (75 words).
· Panels. Please provide a panel rationale of no more than 300 words, with individual paper abstracts (150-300 words) for up to 5 participants. Include titles and institutional affiliations for each participant.
· Digital Posters. Posters may present work on any relevant topic in any stage of development. Poster presentations are intended to be interactive, providing the opportunity to exchange ideas one-on-one with attendees. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words.
· Tools/Digital project demonstration. Tools/Digital Project demonstrations are intended to showcase near-complete or completed work in an interactive environment. Please provide an abstract of 300-500 words. Abstracts should include 1) research significance, 2) stage (near complete/complete), 3) intervention of platform/project/tool 4) demonstration requirements (technology).
· Roundtables. Please provide a rationale of no more than 300 words, accompanied by a list of 4-5 participants (including title and institutional affiliation).

For each proposal please include 3-5 keywords.

  • Examples of topics
  • Abundance and deprivation
  • Activism
  • Africa and the Americas
  • Afro-futurism, -pragmatism and -pessimism
  • Agency and movements
  • Anti-racisms
  • Archives and archival practices
  • Arts and visual cultures
  • Blackness in everyday life
  • Comparative Blackness
  • Cyber/digital feminism
  • Digital presence
  • Digital slave studies
  • Ethics
  • Empirical and epistemological considerations
  • Evaluating digital scholarship
  • Intersectionality
  • Gaming
  • Languages and literatures
  • Local and regional history
  • Memory and commemoration
  • Methods and tools
  • Migration and movement
  • Mobile technologies
  • Pedagogy
  • Performance studies
  • Platform studies
  • Poetics and aesthetics
  • Public humanities
  • Sexualities
  • Social media
  • Space and place
  • Systems of institutional power
  • Within and beyond the academy
  • Youth cultures

About AADHum
The AADHum Initiative (Synergies among African American History and Culture and Digital Humanities) at the University of Maryland is an initiative funded in part by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. AADHum seeks to prepare the next generation of scholars and scholarship by facilitating critical dialogue between digital humanists and African American centered humanities scholarship. The Initiative works to expand the reach of the digital humanities into African American/Africana/Black Studies while enriching humanities research with new methods, archives, and tools. This initiative enhances digital research while recognizing the expertise and knowledge from traditional humanities research and how it may propel digital scholarship forward. In so doing, it fosters a dialogue among a community of scholars from within and outside the academy as they venture into new research and pedagogical endeavors.

Please direct all questions to [email protected]

Oct
22
Mon
CFP: Southern Studies Conference 2019 @ Auburn University at Montgomery
Oct 22 all-day

CFP: Southern Studies Conference, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL, February 1-2, 2019

Now in its eleventh year, the AUM Southern Studies Conference, hosted by Auburn University at Montgomery, explores themes related to the American South across a wide array of disciplines and methodologies. Registrants to the two-day conference enjoy a variety of peer-reviewed panels, two distinguished keynote speakers and a visiting artist, who gives a talk and mounts a gallery exhibition.

The 2019 Conference Committee invites proposals for twenty-minute academic papers or creative presentations on any aspect of Southern Studies (broadly defined), including those relating to the fields of anthropology, geography, art history, history, literature, theater, music, communications, political science, and sociology. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to this theme are welcome. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

–Southern food studies
–Pedagogy and the teaching of Southern topics
–Canonicity and the South
–Slavery and the American South
–Civil War narratives
–Southern archives, museums, and collections
–Civil Rights narratives
–Southern Geographies
–Explorations of race and conflict in the South
–Religion in the South
–Southern literature
–History of science or medicine in the South
–Southern arts (in any medium or genre)
–Southern architecture
–Explorations of the Southern worker
–Southern politics
–Anthropological studies of the South
–Sociological studies of the South
–Southern music
–Cross-cultural exchanges between the South and other geographic areas
–Native American topics of the South
–Stories of immigration/migration and border-crossings
–Contemporary re/mis-conceptions of “The South”
–Presentations by artists/performers/writers working in the South/making work about the South

 

Proposals can be emailed to [email protected] and should include a 250-word abstract and a 2-page CV. The deadline for submission is October 22, 2018. Please note that submission of a proposal constitutes a commitment to attend, if accepted. Presenters will be notified of acceptance by November 2018. For more information, please visit the conference website, or contact Naomi Slipp, Conference Director and Assistant Professor of Art History, Auburn University at Montgomery: [email protected].

Oct
26
Fri
Society for the Scientific Study of Religion | 2018 Annual Meeting
Oct 26 – Oct 28 all-day

The Society for the Scientific Study of Religion invites individual paper, topical session, and author-meets-critics proposals for our 2018 annual meeting, which will take place October 26-28 at the Tropicana Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada.  The theme of the meeting is “Religion and Power: The Creation, Reproduction and Deconstruction of Social Orders.” The deadline to submit abstracts is March 31, 2018, and decision notifications will be made by April 30, 2018.

Please visit the annual meeting information page on our website at http://sssreligion.org/annual-meeting/information/. There you will find links to our call for papers, conference registration, and hotel booking.

Oct
27
Sat
2018 American University Public Anthropology Conference
Oct 27 all-day

2018 American University Public Anthropology Conference: Social Movements and Community Action

The Public Anthropology Conference will explore opportunities for collaboration between academia and social movements. Presenters and attendees will engage in dialogue and share insights about the concrete ways in which activists and academia can strengthen collaborative efforts to combat social inequalities and injustice, discrimination and oppression, and violations of human rights and dignity. Hosted in Washington, D.C., the conference will provide a space to self-critically reflect on the contributions of academia to social movements and the relationship between the two.

The conference is free and all are welcome to attend and participate.  To register please click here.  To submit proposals or questions, please email: [email protected] or visit: https://american.edu/cas/calendar/?id=7788723

Oct
28
Sun
IEEE SENSORS 2018 Conference
Oct 28 – Oct 31 all-day

IEEE ​SENSORS 2018 – the flagship conference of the IEEE Sensors Council – will be held in New Delhi, India from 28 October to 31 October 2018.

IEEE SENSORS 2018 is intended to provide a forum for research scientists, engineers, and practitioners throughout the world to present their latest research findings, ideas, and applications in the area of sensors and sensing technology.

IEEE SENSORS 2018 will include keynote addresses and invited presentations by eminent scientists and engineers. The conference solicits original state-of-the-art contributions as well as review papers.

Please submit a paper and plan to attend!

To view the Call for Papers and for more details, please visit ​the website:  http://ieee-sensors2018.org/

IMPORTANT DEADLINES:
Focused Session Proposals: May 6, 2018
Tutorial ProposalsMay 6, 2018
Paper Submission: June 16, 2018

 

Nov
14
Wed
2018 AAA Annual Meeting @ San Jose Convention Center
Nov 14 – Nov 18 all-day

Change in the Anthropological Imagination: Resistance, Resilience, and Adaptation

Change in the Anthropological Imagination is a timely call to action for papers, posters, workshops, roundtables, and other formats that address the themes of resistance, resilience, and adaptation from a wide range of perspectives. The 2018 meetings are a moment where we can ask ourselves: What can holism tell us about social change in the past, present, and future? How have the processes of resistance, resilience, and adaptation shaped our species? How have societies in the past dealt with dramatic social changes and reorganization? What can be learned by examining the many forces that influence peoples’ understandings and reactions to transformation and stasis, both cross-culturally and across time? Can an anthropological understanding of change improve our ability to envision and undertake new forms of local and global cooperation? Finally, what are the possibilities that we as anthropologists can imagine for our shared futures?

We live in a time of social revolution characterized by resistance, resilience and other forms of human adaptation operating at a series of scales across the world. We are seeing resistance to change, to facts, to truths, to realities, to the status quo, while simultaneously bearing witness to the awe-inspiring resilience of the many people and communities who currently face great challenges. Across the political spectrum and around the globe different forms of cooperation and opposition are shaping our daily lives in positive and negative ways while creating new (im)possibilities for our shared future. This current moment is a clear reminder that human adaptation is an endless and varied source of social and biological responses and much can be learned by focusing on how our species responds to change: What do we mean when we say humans are “resilient”? What can we learn about ourselves by studying our responses to adversity? What does it mean to “resist”? Who resists and why? What inspires cooperation? How do forms, scales, and tempos impact human adaptive responses?

One of the key strengths of our discipline is the diversity that characterizes our approaches to the study of what it means to be human. In this current moment anthropologists from across all sub-disciplines are energized and actively tackling numerous important issues in the past and the present. This includes human-induced climate change, environmental degradation, mass migration and displacement, political instability, and economic and social inequalities. As we look to a better future for all of us, there is perhaps no better time to use our anthropological imagination(s) to help us understand change and the many forces that have impeded and encouraged it through time and across space.

We challenge you to come to the meetings to explore many of the pressing issues facing our discipline and our world and to demonstrate how a focus on change can be a positive force for groundbreaking anthropological research, new forms of cultural understanding, scientific awareness, and global empathy. We will make our collective disciplinary voice heard in San Jose while simultaneously demonstrating the power that comes from our individual, sub-disciplinary, and intra-disciplinary contributions to improving our understanding of the human condition. In 2018, there are many important issues and challenges that anthropology is best suited to address. This meeting is a moment to make that point loud and clear.

Nov
15
Thu
Society for Ethnomusicology 2018 Annual Meeting
Nov 15 – Nov 18 all-day

Society for Ethnomusicology 2018 Annual Meeting—Albuquerque, NM, Nov 15–18, 2018

Registration Now Open

The Society for Ethnomusicology will hold its 63rd Annual Meeting on November 15-18, 2018, at the Hotel Albuquerque in the Old Town district of Albuquerque, New Mexico. In conjunction with the meeting, the University of New Mexico and SEM Latin American and Caribbean Music Section will present a pre-conference symposium on November 14. Visit www.ethnomusicology.org and select “Conferences” for more information about the Annual Meeting, pre-conference symposium, online registration, and hotel accommodations.

Nov
30
Fri
CFP: SLACA Spring 2019 Conference
Nov 30 all-day

CALL FOR PAPERS & POSTERS
SLACA SPRING 2019 CONFERENCE
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
April 11-13, 2019

Featuring Keynote Kearney Lecture by Dr. Yarimar Bonilla (Rutgers)

Reconstructions: Material, Political, and Theoretical Renovations

 

Reconstructions is an invitation to consider the ways in which anthropology has been involved in ongoing processes of building and rebuilding Latin America and the Caribbean both materially and intellectually. As the title suggests, we understand reconstruction as a form of renovation that includes the transformation of material and political landscapes, the renewal of intellectual trends and discussions, and recent engagements with old and new issues. Reconstruction also suggests that we look beyond deconstruction and reflect on how Latin America and the Caribbean are sites of constant debate on the reconstruction of their past legacies and future directions.

The Society for Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology (SLACA) welcomes paper and poster submissions under the conference theme Reconstructions. We invite theoretical and empirical analyses that address reconstruction in Latin America and the Caribbean. We particularly encourage members to submit abstracts dealing with the reconstruction/renovation of the following: borders (materially and symbolically); national and regional identities; material landscapes impacted by climate change, natural disaster, and political mobilizations; legal and judicial systems; and racial, ethnic, class, and gender politics.

Submission of abstracts must be done through SLACA’s website. Please visit http://slaca.americananthro.org to submit your abstract on or before November 30th, 2018. Should you have questions, please contact the conference organizing committee at: [email protected]. Detailed information about the conference venue, hotel accommodations, and conference program activities will be made available on the SLACA website.

 

Conference Fees

  • $80  Members from the United States, Canada, and Europe
  • $50  Members from Latin America
  • $30  Students

 

Conference Format

We are limiting the number of papers to no more than 40 in order to assure that there are no concurrent sessions on the conference theme. Posters and papers can be written in Spanish, Portuguese, French, and English. However, because the meetings are in a Spanish-speaking locale, presentations in Spanish will reach more people and are encouraged.

 

Important dates and deadlines

  • November 30, 2018        Deadline for submission of abstracts
  • January 14, 2019            Confirmation of acceptance
  • February 1, 2019            Confirmation of participation
  • April 11-13, 2019            Conference in Santo Domingo, D.R.

 

Selection procedure

The Conference Committee will select 30-40 papers to be presented at the conference’s thematic sessions on April -11-13, 2019. To ensure one’s participation, the committee must receive confirmation of participation no later than February 1, 2019. Participation is contingent on confirmation.

 

Conference Organizing Committee

  • Ricardo Pérez, SLACA Councilor (Bi-Annual Meeting Chair, 2015-18)
  • Iván Sandoval Cervantes, SLACA Councilor (Bi-Annual Meeting Chair, 2018-21)
  • Ronda Brulotte, SLACA President
  • Luisa Rollins Castillo, SLACA Councilor
  • Joseph Feldman, SLACA Member
Dec
4
Tue
AAS2018: Life in an Age of Death
Dec 4 – Dec 7 all-day

AAS2018: LIFE IN AN AGE OF DEATH

4-7 December, 2018

James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia

During the first decades of the twenty-first century, the proliferation of life as a generative possibility has become marked by the spectre of death, closure, denial and ends. Ours is an era of precarity, extinction, militarised inequality, a seemingly boundless war on terror, the waning legitimacy of human rights, a rising consciousness of animal cruelty and consumer complicity in killing and suffering, and the global closure of decolonial and socialist windows of emancipation. Artificial intelligence and post-human technology-flesh interventions have become sources of existential threat to be secured against, rather than means of freeing, or otherwise expanding life. Mbembe (2003) first developed the notion of necropolitics in relation to ‘assemblages of death’, zones where technology, economy and social structures bind together to reproduce patterns of extreme violence. Following Foucault, he envisaged a distribution of the world into life zones and death zones. While we can readily identify zones of life and death on these terms, the imaginaries of death have increasingly colonised life zones.

This conference seeks to embrace this moment in history in all its roiling complexity, challenge, and specificity. It asks what accounts for this current interest in the spectre of Death in the anthropological imagination? What sorts of life—social, cultural, technological, creative—emerge in spaces pregnant with death and other life-ending spectres? What new horizons of fear, hope and possibility emerge? What kinds of new social formations, subjectivities and cultural imaginaries?

What social and cultural forms might an affirmative biopolitics, where the power of life is regained from the spectre of death, take? What new strategies of engagement, activism and refusal?

What can anthropology specifically bring to these emergent and often-interdisciplinary zones of urgency? How might our methods, theories and orientations be re-tooled and re-energised for these shadowed times?

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Refugee camp life, detention centres, border zones
  • New interspecies alliances
  • Securitisation of the internet of things
  • Agriculture and food in relation to animal cruelty and environmental degradation
  • Militarisation of urban space and zones of expulsion
  • Affective ecologies
  • Terms of the biopolitical across species, taxa
  • Aging populations
  • Securitising life, normalised insecurity
  • The medical body and social body technologies
  • Death of the fight for the internet
  • Reimagining the museum
  • Mediated death and the digital
  • Indigenous deathscapes
  • Posthuman experiments in and experiences of technology in the flesh
  • Autonomous systems
  • Memory, affect and imaginaries of life
  • Affirmative and critical biopolitics

For further information please see:

https://www.aasconf.org/2018/call-for-panels

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Panels and roundtables: 5 April to 7 May
Call for Papers, Labs: 21 May to 22 June
Early Bird registration opens: 10 August
Standard registration opens: 29 September