Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jun
30
Sat
Seventh Anthropological Film Festival at The Jerusalem Cinematheque
Jun 30 all-day

The Seventh Anthropological Film Festival at The Jerusalem Cinematheque is on its way (November 2018) and we are now open for entries.

We would be very happy to get your films 2017–2018

The registration deadline is June 30th, 2018

Eligibility requirements are:

  • Screeners must be submitted online vimeo private link valid until June 30th 2018,  to my mail address: [email protected] 
  • Works must be subtitled in English
  • Works previously refused by the Anthropological Film Festival- Jerusalem can not be resubmitted.
  • A list of the selected films will be available via our website homepage in early September 2018.

The Festival selects films that document and explore human societies and cultures in their many facets, such as, social and cultural diversity, continuity and change, relationship with the environment and to promote dialogue between cultures.

We welcome submissions of documentary films made by anthropologists, students, and professional filmmakers; we welcome films at least 45min. long all varieties and styles of filmmaking.

The festival is a joint project of the Jerusalem Cinematheque-Israel Film Archive and the Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

Call for Proposals: Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life
Jun 30 all-day

Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life

ABOUT THE SERIES:

How are urban processes entangled with human experiences? In this series, scholarly monographs and edited volumes explore this question and illuminate diverse forms of such entanglement through empirically-based research. This series emphasizes anthropological approaches to the study of human life in relation to the urban. It seeks to illuminate experiences and effects of urban cultures and situate specific cases in a comparative set. By exploring the intricacies of human-urban relations, this series contributes to better understanding of the ways that humans particularly conceive of and experience nature, personhood, ethics, culture, and social life.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

To submit a manuscript for consideration by Lexington Books, please send:

  • a prospectus (see below for details)
  • a detailed table of contents
  • one or two sample chapters
  • your curriculum vitae

If you are proposing a contributed volume, please include titles, affiliations, and brief resumes for each of the contributors, as well as chapter abstracts.

The prospectus should include:

  1. A description of the book, describing the core themes, arguments, issues, goals, and/or topics of the work, what makes it unique, what questions it seeks to answer, and why you are qualified to write it. (2-5 pages)
  2. A description of your target audience (undergraduate or graduate students? scholars? professionals?).
  3. An analysis of competing or similar books (including publishers and dates), indicating distinctive and original elements of your project that set it apart from these other works.
  4. A list of courses in which your book might be used as a text or supplementary text, indicating the course level at which this book may be used.
  5. An indication of whether any part of your manuscript has been published previously, and if it is a doctoral dissertation, what changes you are proposing to prepare it for publication.
  6. The length of the manuscript either as a word count or a page count (12-point type on double-spaced 8.5”×11” pages). Will there be figures, tables, or other non-text material, and, if so, approximately how many? If the text is not complete, please still estimate its final length, not including the non-text material.
  7. If the manuscript is not complete, an estimation of when it will be finished. Is there a particular date by which you hope the book will be published (due to a historical anniversary, conference, etc.?
  8. The names of four to seven respected scholars in your field with whom you have no personal or professional relationship. Include their titles, affiliations, e-mail addresses, and/or mailing addresses.
  9. An indication of whether the manuscript is under consideration by other publishers.

Please do not send your entire manuscript.

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Jessica Bodoh-Creed is lecturer of anthropology at California State University.

Melissa King is assistant professor of anthropology at San Bernardino Valley College

Leonido Gines Jr. is lecturer of architecture at De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, and founder of studioGINES.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact: Jessica Bodoh-Creed ([email protected]), Leonido Gines Jr. ([email protected]), and Melissa King ([email protected])

Jul
1
Sun
2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition
Jul 1 all-day

2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology announces our annual poetry competition as a means to encourage scholars to use alternative literary genres to explore anthropological concerns. These concerns may be any of those associated with any of the five fields of anthropology: Archaeological, Biological, Linguistic, Sociocultural and Applied. Deadline: July 1, 2018. There is no entry fee for this competition. Please email your entry (no more than three unpublished poems) as a single pdf document to: [email protected] without the author’s name (anonymized), along with a separate cover page with the following information by the Deadline of July 1, 2018:

  • NAME, TITLE, INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION (S)
  • CONTACT INFO (ADDRESS, PHONE, EMAIL)
  • POEM TITLE (S)
  • ETHNOPOETRY STATEMENT*

The anonymous entry pdf must include an *ethnographic statement (of no more than 400 words) which connects the poem(s) submitted to anthropology which will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections. Examples of ethnographic statements can be found in the poems published in Anthropology and Humanism: (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anhu.12058/full).

Before you submit a manuscript to the competition, please consider exploring the work of the ethnographic poets we have published. We’re drawn to technical virtuosity combined with abundant imagination, vivid imagery, and musical approaches to fresh language, risk-taking, and an ability to convey penetrating insights into human experience. We seek a layer of trust concerning the writer’s experience and perspective as both anthropologist and creative writer, one who is ethically responsible in terms of representing the other, one who is able to locate his or her reader in the context of the ethnographic study and reveal anthropological themes associated with any of the fields of anthropology.

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose in November 14-18, 2018. The first-place winner(s) will receive a certificate and award of $100. All entries will be considered for publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. (Note that Membership in AAA or an institutional subscription is required for digital access to the journal and SHA membership with the paid print option is required to receive a print issue.)

JUDGES: Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor, Nomi Stone, & Ather Zia 

Jul
2
Mon
Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition
Jul 2 all-day

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology is pleased to announce that we are opening our annual writing contest for Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction. We celebrate the use of creative literary prose genres to explore anthropological concerns, and we encourage you to share your work with us.

As a guideline, ethnographic fiction and creative nonfiction use literary elements to bring stories to life and engage the reader. Whether fiction or nonfiction, these creative prose pieces reflect insights about the real world seen through an anthropological lens or reflecting an anthropological sensibility (related to any field of anthropology).

Submissions should not exceed 20 pages typed double-spaced, and need to work as stand-alone stories. There is a limit of one submission per applicant.

We do expect contestants to be affiliated with the field or practice of anthropology and/or ethnography in some manner. There is no entry fee for this competition.

Submission deadline is July 2, 2018. Submissions must be previously unpublished and not currently under consideration elsewhere.

Please email your entry as two pdf documents to: [email protected] The entry should consist of two files:

  1. 1)  Your story (double spaced) with title but without the author’s name (anonymized), PLUS an extra final page with a statement of no more than 400 words that answers the question: “How is this piece anthropologically informed and in what ways has your background in the field contributed to it?” This statement will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections.
  2. 2)  A separate cover page with your full name, title of your submission, mailing address, email address, and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

JUDGES: Julia Offen (Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Editor, Anthropology and Humanism), John Wood (Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville), Katrina Daly Thompson (Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison), and Caitrin Lynch (Professor, Olin College)

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized in a ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose, CA 11/14/2018 – 11/18/2018.

The first-place winner will receive an award of $100 and publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. The second-place winner will receive $75. And the third-place winner will receive $50. All winners will receive a certificate of their award.

Jul
26
Thu
2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society
Jul 26 – Jul 29 all-day

Call for Papers, Posters, and Organized Sessions: 2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society Portland, Oregon

July 26‐29, 2018

MEETING THEME: Science in Society, Society in Science – Toward a 21st Century Model for Social Scientific Research

Growing public skepticism about the value of science and expert knowledge has been a defining characteristic of the early 21st century. Critiques of science come from many sources – populist anti‐elite social movements, academic studies of conventional scientific methods and institutions, and advocates for a more participatory approach to knowledge production. As the distinction between ‘facts’ and ‘values’ has become blurred, the evidence‐base that informs current policy becomes increasingly contested territory. Notably, social scientists have long relied on evidence and scientific research to challenge popular misunderstandings of social problems like poverty, crime, racism, and sexism. At the same time, they have been at the forefront of critiques of the mainstream scientific enterprise and helped pioneer new approaches to research and engagement.

Professional social science societies (like RSS) have an obligation to support those who are studying and developing effective responses to the challenges faced by rural people and places in a globalized world. New models for scientific research will be increasingly important if our efforts are to inform public discourse and shape the development of effective public policies. To do this, we need to reconcile tensions between the desire to retain the power and insights of rigorous scientific methods, and our awareness of the societal biases associated with conventional scientific institutions. At the 2018 Annual Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, we particularly encourage attendees to present work that explores this vexing and enduring issue, and to provide examples of innovative approaches to applied scientific research on rural topics.

Over the last 80 years, the annual meetings of the RSS have been a venue for the exchange of ideas and information about a wide range of rural issues. Our attendees include faculty and students from diverse colleges and universities, researchers working in government or nonprofit institutions, and rural activists and practitioners. In addition to presentations on the meeting theme, we always invite presentations of research and engagement focused rural people, places and themes from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives.

Abstracts: Abstracts should be approximately 350‐500 words and briefly outline the purpose and theoretical framing of the paper, poster, program, or organized session. Where appropriate, include information about methods, data, and preliminary findings. The deadline for submitting papers, posters and sessions is Thursday, February 1, 2018, 11:59 pm (EST).

To submit, visit the “Annual Meetings” tab on the RSS website, www.ruralsociology.org.

Please contact the Program Chair, Kate MacTavish ([email protected]) or the RSS Business Office ([email protected]) with any questions about submission or to explore ideas for special events at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Sep
24
Mon
Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’
Sep 24 – Oct 2 all-day

Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’

24 September-02 October 2019, Svaneti & Tbilisi, Georgia

Why are some places especially prone to associations with the supernatural? Might it be because of liminal geographies, of the complex histories of ancient human landscapes, of fear about what lurks in the darkness? Are communities’ beliefs shaped by the environments in which they live, or does the recurrence of certain belief across environmental and geographic divides suggest that place is ultimately irrelevant? When we read a book or watch a film with supernatural themes, is the setting just window dressing, or can the mountains, the palaces, the forests, the skyscrapers be characters in their own right?

Previous conferences in this series have been held on remote islands (Shetland’s North Isles, 2014), in a hyper-dense city-state (Macau, 2015), and in the polar night (Svalbard, 2017). In 2019, the conference will go farther and higher than ever before, venturing up into the wild mountain valleys of and ancient cities of Georgia, a country at the crossroads of East and West.

This conference considers the themes of 1) folk belief, legends, and vernacular religion and 2) the supernatural in literature and film. We will combine academic presentations with explorations of communities in Georgia’s Svaneti and Tbilisi regions. Special emphasis will be given to the question of the role that ‘place’ plays in the conceptions of the supernatural: from folk narratives to local religious traditions; from the monsters, fairies, and witches of cinema to the miraculous in literature. Could these tales and customs occur just about anywhere? Or do they take place in the just the place they need to be?    

How to make attend and make a presentation.

Presentations are welcome on all aspects of of either folk belief or the supernatural in literature and film, though we encourage delegates to address the theme of the role of place in conceptions of the supernatural.Presentations last 15 minutes and will be followed by around 5 minutes’ question time. Note that, due to the ‘remote’ location of the conference, audio-visual aids will not be available for presentations.

The first deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2018. (Later abstracts may be accepted if there is room available at the conference, but people who submit an abstract prior to the deadline will have the first opportunity to reserve a spot and to take advantage of the early registration rate.) You can submit your abstract here. The deadline for early registration is 30 November 2018.

Sep
27
Thu
German Studies Association: Call for Seminar Proposals
Sep 27 – Sep 30 all-day

GERMAN STUDIES ASSOCIATION: CALL FOR SEMINAR PROPOSALS

The 42nd GSA Conference in Pittsburgh, PA (September 27–30, 2018) will continue to host a series of seminars in addition to conference sessions and roundtables.

Seminars meet for all three days of the conference. They explore new avenues of academic exchange and foster extended discussion, rigorous intellectual debate, and intensified networking. Seminars are typically proposed and led by two to three conveners and they consist of 12 to 20 participants, including scholars from different disciplines and at different career stages. Seminars may enable extended discussion of a recent academic publication; the exploration of a promising new research topic; engagement with pre-circulated papers; an opportunity to debate the work of scholars with different approaches; the coming together of groups of scholars seeking to develop an anthology; or the in-depth discussion of a political or public policy issue, novel, film, poem, artwork, or musical piece.

In order to facilitate extended discussion, seminar conveners and participants should participate in all three seminar meetings. Please note that seminar conveners and seminar applicants who have been accepted for seminar participation will not be allowed to submit a paper in a regular panel session. However, they may take on one additional role in the conference as moderator or commentator on another session independent of their enrollment in a seminar, or they may participate in a roundtable.

Although we accept proposals from conveners who have directed a seminar during the past two consecutive years, we give preference to newcomers and thus encourage the rotation of seminar conveners in similarly-themed seminars. We further recommend that those conveners contact the coordinators of the Interdisciplinary Network Committee, Professors Pamela Potter ([email protected]) and Winson Chu ([email protected]), to establish an official GSA Network on their topic.

The application process has two steps. Initially, we invite you to submit a preliminary proposal that includes the following items:

  1. Title
  2. Names of conveners
  3. A 150-word description of the seminar’s subject (which will eventually be used in the call for participants, the printed program, and the online program/mobile app)
  4. A 50-word description of the format of the seminar (which will also appear in the call for participants, etc.)

These items are due by November 13, 2017.

Please submit your application online at https://www.xcdsystem.com/gsa. Your username and password are the same ones you use to log in to your GSA profile at https://thegsa.org/members/profile. Please note that you must be a current member of the GSA to submit a proposal. If you need your password reset, please contact Ms. Ursula Gray ([email protected]) at Johns Hopkins University Press. If technical questions or problems arise with the submission interface itself, please contact Elizabeth Fulton at [email protected].

At this point, the GSA Seminar Committee will provide suggestions and assistance for the final submission, which is due by December 13, 2017. The committee will then review seminar proposals and post a list of approved seminars and their topics on the GSA website by early January 2018.

 

The GSA Seminar Committee consists of:

Margaret Eleanor Menninger (Texas State University) | [email protected] (Chair)

Maria Mitchell (Franklin & Marshall College) | [email protected]

Faye Stewart (Georgia State University) | [email protected]

Dec
4
Tue
AAS2018: Life in an Age of Death
Dec 4 – Dec 7 all-day

AAS2018: LIFE IN AN AGE OF DEATH

4-7 December, 2018

James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia

During the first decades of the twenty-first century, the proliferation of life as a generative possibility has become marked by the spectre of death, closure, denial and ends. Ours is an era of precarity, extinction, militarised inequality, a seemingly boundless war on terror, the waning legitimacy of human rights, a rising consciousness of animal cruelty and consumer complicity in killing and suffering, and the global closure of decolonial and socialist windows of emancipation. Artificial intelligence and post-human technology-flesh interventions have become sources of existential threat to be secured against, rather than means of freeing, or otherwise expanding life. Mbembe (2003) first developed the notion of necropolitics in relation to ‘assemblages of death’, zones where technology, economy and social structures bind together to reproduce patterns of extreme violence. Following Foucault, he envisaged a distribution of the world into life zones and death zones. While we can readily identify zones of life and death on these terms, the imaginaries of death have increasingly colonised life zones.

This conference seeks to embrace this moment in history in all its roiling complexity, challenge, and specificity. It asks what accounts for this current interest in the spectre of Death in the anthropological imagination? What sorts of life—social, cultural, technological, creative—emerge in spaces pregnant with death and other life-ending spectres? What new horizons of fear, hope and possibility emerge? What kinds of new social formations, subjectivities and cultural imaginaries?

What social and cultural forms might an affirmative biopolitics, where the power of life is regained from the spectre of death, take? What new strategies of engagement, activism and refusal?

What can anthropology specifically bring to these emergent and often-interdisciplinary zones of urgency? How might our methods, theories and orientations be re-tooled and re-energised for these shadowed times?

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Refugee camp life, detention centres, border zones
  • New interspecies alliances
  • Securitisation of the internet of things
  • Agriculture and food in relation to animal cruelty and environmental degradation
  • Militarisation of urban space and zones of expulsion
  • Affective ecologies
  • Terms of the biopolitical across species, taxa
  • Aging populations
  • Securitising life, normalised insecurity
  • The medical body and social body technologies
  • Death of the fight for the internet
  • Reimagining the museum
  • Mediated death and the digital
  • Indigenous deathscapes
  • Posthuman experiments in and experiences of technology in the flesh
  • Autonomous systems
  • Memory, affect and imaginaries of life
  • Affirmative and critical biopolitics

For further information please see:

https://www.aasconf.org/2018/call-for-panels

IMPORTANT DATES

Call for Panels and roundtables: 5 April to 7 May
Call for Papers, Labs: 21 May to 22 June
Early Bird registration opens: 10 August
Standard registration opens: 29 September

Feb
15
Fri
25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

May
1
Wed
2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies
May 1 all-day

2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is pleased to announce that the 2019 ACIP workshop will be African Ethnographies. The project was proposed and will be organized by colleagues at the University of the Western Cape, Jung Ran Annachiara Forte (Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology) and Sakhumzi Mfecane (Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology and Sociology). Activities will take place in Cape Town, South Africa.

African Ethnographies
While the practice of ethnography has a long history in Africa, insufficient debate has emerged around it recently on the African continent. Far from being specific only to anthropology, ethnography has become a widespread mode of knowing inside and outside academic spaces. We would like to prompt reflection around this concept and practice, which is slippery, changing, dense, polysemic, and composed of a plurality of voices. The African Ethnographies workshop will raise questions about ethnography across disciplines, its contemporary forms – not exclusively written, and its publics. Ethnography enables conceptual work that transcends simple divides between the empirical, the methodological, and the theoretical. The workshop is particularly interested in understanding how ethnography and its conceptual work can allow us to grasp the complexities of contemporary African worlds, their precariousness, and their becomings. We are interested in exploring: (1) the work of theorization that ethnography makes possible; (2) understandings of public ethnography today; and finally (3) ways to re-rethink ethnography from the African continent. The workshop seeks to open a space of dialogue by bringing together emerging scholars across different disciplines and from institutions across Africa. By engaging in discussions around theory, methods, public engagements, and ethnographic sensibilities and modes of expression, we hope to better understand the challenges of doing ethnography in Africa’s contemporary worlds. The workshop will include a performance/ lecture that explores the performative potential of ethnographic work and will result in both an edited book and a film about ethnography based on the workshop and interviews with participants.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

Information about applying to organize the 2020 ACIP workshop and for the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards will be available in November 2018. The deadline for both workshop applications and student applications is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund.