Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Apr
27
Fri
International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics
Apr 27 all-day

International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics

On behalf of the Organization Committee, we are pleased to invite you to the International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics (ICFAEC 2018) which will be held on 27-28th April 2018 in Alanya, Turkey.

ICFAEC 2018 aims at disseminating new knowledge in the field economics and provides a forum for deliberations and exchange of knowledge among academics, organizations, and researchers. ICFAEC 2018 encourages submission of theoretical and empirical papers in the different domains of food and agricultural economics and related disciplines, within and across different levels of analysis. ICFAEC 2018 focuses on are: 

  • Food Economics
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Food Policy
  • Agricultural Management
  • Farm Management
  • Rural Development
  • Sustainable Development
  • Farming Systems
  • Agricultural Policy
  • Agribusiness
  • Socio-economic Aspects
  • Food Marketing
  • Rural & Agricultural Sociology
  • Agricultural Extension
  • Agritourism
  • Financing credits and agricultural subsidies
  • Logistics of agricultural production
  • Research and development
  • Irrigation and water management

We look forward to greeting you at the International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics (ICFAEC 2018) in Alanya, Turkey.

For more information about the conference organization, please check this web page. www.ageconalanya.com

Important Dates

Submission Deadline of Abstracts: January 20th, 2018
Notification of Acceptance/Rejection:  With in 4 weeks of submission time
Submission Deadline of Full Papers: February 20th, 2018
Deadline of Early Bird Registration: March 1sh, 2018

Best regards,

ICFAEC Oganizing Committee

Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Faculty of Business, Department of Economics and Finance, 07400 Alanya/Antalya-Turkey, Tel:+ (90) 242 518 21 21-1236, Fax : +(90) 242 518 20 25

Emails:  [email protected]

May
1
Tue
Call for Proposals: African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshops
May 1 all-day
CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO ORGANIZE A WORKSHOP

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organize a workshop to take place in 2019. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular questions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, or representational or institutional forms from diverse methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that bring into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energize conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organizations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organizations, NGOs or others appropriate to the topic.

Abstracts for previously funded ACIP Workshops are available here.

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2019.
  •  a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  • a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  •  a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organizers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape for basic financial administration and are responsible for complying with CHR policies. Workshop organizers should submit a letter from the host institution, centre, programme, or department confirming that appropriate administrative and institutional support will be available.

We ask Workshop organizers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organizers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organizations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches or specializations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply:

Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  •  abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement defining the proposed Workshop theme and focus, its significance, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organizing the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organizer)
  • an institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop. Please describe available administrative and logistical support in this letter and/or your work plan
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organization, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

Conceptualization: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross- institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed Workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

Workshop organizer(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organizing the Workshop, including previous administration/organization and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

Applicants who organize an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research.

After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Tuesday 1 May 2018. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

 

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2019 Workshop Proposal” to [email protected]

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund
http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html
 https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

2018 Call for Submissions: Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing
May 1 all-day

2018 Call for Submissions: Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing

 The Society for Humanistic Anthropology (SHA) announces the annual juried competition for the Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing. The late Victor Turner devoted his career to seeking an accessible language that would reopen anthropology to the human subject, and the competition recognizes the innovative books that further this project.

AWARD
A $1,000 first-place, a $500 second place and a $250 third-place prize will be awarded at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose, California, November 14-18, 2018.

ELIGIBILITY
Eligible genres include single and co-authored ethnographic monographs, narratives, historical accounts, biographies, memoirs, dramas, or single-authored collections of essays, short stories, or poems. Book publication year must be no earlier than 2016. Books may be entered into the competition by authors, publishers, book editors, or colleagues. No formal letter of nomination is needed. Books published in 2016-2017 entered in last year’s competition may be resubmitted this year with the appropriate entry fee.
SUBMISSION: FEE
For authors who are already SHA members, the entry fee is $25/book. For authors who are not SHA members, the entry fee is $75/book. (Publishers: for all books you submit, please check with authors first to discover whether they are current SHA members and please encourage authors to join SHA). The fee may be paid either online here (log into Anthro Gateway to get the SHA member rate of $25), or by check (made out to the American Anthropological Association) with the Submission-Fee-Form sent to:

Kathy Ano, Controller
American Anthropological Association 2300 Clarendon Blvd, Suite 1301
Arlington, VA 22201-3386
Phone: 703.528.1902 ext. 1161
Fax: 703.528.3546

SUBMISSION: BOOKS (a total of 3 copies)Send one copy of the book to be entered to each of the three judges:

Victor Turner Prize, c/o Anna Tsing
Department of Anthropology Aarhus University Moesgaard Alle 20
8270 Hojbjerg Denmark

Victor Turner Prize, c/o Helena Wulff Stockholm University
Department of Social Anthropology SE-10691 Stockholm
Sweden

Victor Turner Prize, c/o Julia Offen 1986 Paquita Dr.
Carpinteria, CA 93013 U.S.A.

 

SUBMISSION: COVER LETTER

All submitters to the contest must also send a cover letter to [email protected] with the following four items of required information:

  1. book title, publication year, and publisher;
  2. author’s contact information including mailing address, all telephone numbers and e-mail address;
  3. author’s biographical sketch (1-2 paragraphs) including highest degree awarded, discipline, and institution;
  4. current affiliation (university or otherwise).

Biographical information will be used for presenting the winners and publicizing the results of the competition and will not be used for judging the quality of the entries. Entrants may also include an optional short statement about intellectual training/ orientation, and the circumstances surrounding the research/ writing of the book.

The deadline for receipt of all required materials is May 1, 2018.

All inquiries should be directed to Dr. Julia Offen, prize coordinator, at [email protected]

African Critical Inquiry Programme Call for Proposals to Organize a Workshop
May 1 all-day

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organize a workshop to take place in 2019. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa.

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular notions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational or institutional forms from methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that brings into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organizations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches or specializations to the proposed Workshop theme.

For full information about this opportunity and how to apply, see the full Call for Proposals listed under “ACIP Opportunities” on our website: http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html.

May
15
Tue
Dear Colleague Letter: Disrupting Operations of Illicit Supply Networks
May 15 all-day

Dear Colleague Letter: Disrupting Operations of Illicit Supply Networks

March 27, 2018

Dear Colleagues:

 

Illicit supply networks pose profound threats to the health, prosperity, and security of our Nation. These nimble and technologically sophisticated networks traffic enslaved people, illegal weapons, drugs (including opioids), nuclear material, looted antiquities, exotic animal products, and other contraband. These same networks function to funnel illicit profits back to criminal organizations. Illicit supply networks are unencumbered by national boundaries and fuel transnational criminal organizations, with grave consequences for national and international security.

With this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), the National Science Foundation (NSF) invites proposals to the Operations Engineering program for EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) into operational methods to detect, disrupt and disable illicit supply networks. Supplemental funding requests to relevant existing NSF awards and responsive to this DCL are also invited. Such requests also must be responsive to this DCL.

Projects must focus on fundamental research that advances the scientific understanding of the operations of illicit supply networks and methods for their disruption. In recognition of the high importance of broader impacts in NSF research, proposed work must be framed in the context of one or more distinct illicit trafficking environment(s), and must demonstrate domain knowledge of the chosen setting.

While proposals must be responsive to the Operations Engineering program description, given the gravity, scope and complexity of illicit supply networks, submissions from transdisciplinary teams, including operations researchers, are strongly encouraged. Teams may include researchers from the geography and spatial sciences; law and criminal justice; data and computational science; economics; and/or public health communities. In that vein, the benefits and skillsets of the proposed teams, including how they will collaborate, should be articulated.

Representative topics include (but are not limited to) modeling the operational and spatial dynamics of illicit networks; understanding market incentives and mechanisms of illicit networks, including their social, cultural, criminological and legal aspects; innovations in data science and engineering in online space that have the potential to detect and disrupt illicit operations.

EAGER proposals with budgets up to $300,000 or supplemental funding requests s to existing awards up to 20% of the original award budget (but not exceeding $300,000) will be considered. Proposed budgets must be justified by project scope. See the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) for guidelines and expectations for these types of proposals. In particular, EAGER proposals must clearly indicate the reason that the proposed work is appropriate for EAGER support.

Interested PIs must contact one of the program officers listed below before submission of their EAGER proposal:

Georgia-Ann Klutke, ENG/CMMI, [email protected], (703) 292-2443
Mark Hurwitz, SBE/SES, [email protected], (703) 292-7023
Wendy Nilsen, CISE/IIS, [email protected], (703) 292-2568
Antoinette Winklerprins, SBE/BCS, [email protected], (703) 292-7266
Jonathan Leland, SBE/SES, [email protected], (703) 292-7285

EAGER proposals and supplemental funding requests for supplemental funding will be reviewed on an ongoing basis, but should be submitted to the Operations Engineering program in the Civil, Mechanical, and Manufacturing Innovation Division of the Engineering Directorate by May 15, 2018, to be considered for FY 2018 funding. Titles for proposals responding to this DCL should be prefixed with “EAGER: ISN:”.

Jun
1
Fri
2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition
Jun 1 all-day

2018 SHA Ethnographic Poetry Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology announces our annual poetry competition as a means to encourage scholars to use alternative literary genres to explore anthropological concerns. These concerns may be any of those associated with any of the five fields of anthropology: Archaeological, Biological, Linguistic, Sociocultural and Applied. Deadline: June 1, 2018. There is no entry fee for this competition. Please email your entry (no more than three unpublished poems) as a single pdf document to: [email protected] without the author’s name (anonymized), along with a separate cover page with the following information by the Deadline of June 1, 2018:

  • NAME, TITLE, INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION (S)
  • CONTACT INFO (ADDRESS, PHONE, EMAIL)
  • POEM TITLE (S)
  • ETHNOPOETRY STATEMENT*

The anonymous entry pdf must include an *ethnographic statement (of no more than 400 words) which connects the poem(s) submitted to anthropology which will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections. Examples of ethnographic statements can be found in the poems published in Anthropology and Humanism: (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/anhu.12058/full).

Before you submit a manuscript to the competition, please consider exploring the work of the ethnographic poets we have published. We’re drawn to technical virtuosity combined with abundant imagination, vivid imagery, and musical approaches to fresh language, risk-taking, and an ability to convey penetrating insights into human experience. We seek a layer of trust concerning the writer’s experience and perspective as both anthropologist and creative writer, one who is ethically responsible in terms of representing the other, one who is able to locate his or her reader in the context of the ethnographic study and reveal anthropological themes associated with any of the fields of anthropology.

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose in November 14-18, 2018. The first-place winner(s) will receive a certificate and award of $100. All entries will be considered for publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. (Note that Membership in AAA or an institutional subscription is required for digital access to the journal and SHA membership with the paid print option is required to receive a print issue.)

JUDGES: Melisa Cahnmann-Taylor, Nomi Stone, & Ather Zia 

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition
Jun 1 all-day

Call for Submissions: Society for Humanistic Anthropology 2018 Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Competition

The Society for Humanistic Anthropology is pleased to announce that we are opening our annual writing contest for Ethnographic Fiction and Creative Nonfiction. We celebrate the use of creative literary prose genres to explore anthropological concerns, and we encourage you to share your work with us.

As a guideline, ethnographic fiction and creative nonfiction use literary elements to bring stories to life and engage the reader. Whether fiction or nonfiction, these creative prose pieces reflect insights about the real world seen through an anthropological lens or reflecting an anthropological sensibility (related to any field of anthropology).

Submissions should not exceed 20 pages typed double-spaced, and need to work as stand-alone stories. There is a limit of one submission per applicant.

We do expect contestants to be affiliated with the field or practice of anthropology and/or ethnography in some manner. There is no entry fee for this competition.

Submission deadline is June 1, 2018. Submissions must be previously unpublished and not currently under consideration elsewhere.

Please email your entry as two pdf documents to: [email protected] The entry should consist of two files:

  1. 1)  Your story (double spaced) with title but without the author’s name (anonymized), PLUS an extra final page with a statement of no more than 400 words that answers the question: “How is this piece anthropologically informed and in what ways has your background in the field contributed to it?” This statement will be taken into account as the judges make their award selections.
  2. 2)  A separate cover page with your full name, title of your submission, mailing address, email address, and institutional affiliation (if applicable).

JUDGES: Julia Offen (Fiction and Creative Nonfiction Editor, Anthropology and Humanism), John Wood (Professor, University of North Carolina Asheville), Katrina Daly Thompson (Professor, University of Wisconsin Madison), and Caitrin Lynch (Professor, Olin College)

Winning entries and honorable mentions will be recognized in a ceremony at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in San Jose, CA 11/14/2018 – 11/18/2018.

The first-place winner will receive an award of $100 and publication in the Society’s journal, Anthropology and Humanism. The second-place winner will receive $75. And the third-place winner will receive $50. All winners will receive a certificate of their award.

Jun
30
Sat
Call for Proposals: Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life
Jun 30 all-day

Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life

ABOUT THE SERIES:

How are urban processes entangled with human experiences? In this series, scholarly monographs and edited volumes explore this question and illuminate diverse forms of such entanglement through empirically-based research. This series emphasizes anthropological approaches to the study of human life in relation to the urban. It seeks to illuminate experiences and effects of urban cultures and situate specific cases in a comparative set. By exploring the intricacies of human-urban relations, this series contributes to better understanding of the ways that humans particularly conceive of and experience nature, personhood, ethics, culture, and social life.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

To submit a manuscript for consideration by Lexington Books, please send:

  • a prospectus (see below for details)
  • a detailed table of contents
  • one or two sample chapters
  • your curriculum vitae

If you are proposing a contributed volume, please include titles, affiliations, and brief resumes for each of the contributors, as well as chapter abstracts.

The prospectus should include:

  1. A description of the book, describing the core themes, arguments, issues, goals, and/or topics of the work, what makes it unique, what questions it seeks to answer, and why you are qualified to write it. (2-5 pages)
  2. A description of your target audience (undergraduate or graduate students? scholars? professionals?).
  3. An analysis of competing or similar books (including publishers and dates), indicating distinctive and original elements of your project that set it apart from these other works.
  4. A list of courses in which your book might be used as a text or supplementary text, indicating the course level at which this book may be used.
  5. An indication of whether any part of your manuscript has been published previously, and if it is a doctoral dissertation, what changes you are proposing to prepare it for publication.
  6. The length of the manuscript either as a word count or a page count (12-point type on double-spaced 8.5”×11” pages). Will there be figures, tables, or other non-text material, and, if so, approximately how many? If the text is not complete, please still estimate its final length, not including the non-text material.
  7. If the manuscript is not complete, an estimation of when it will be finished. Is there a particular date by which you hope the book will be published (due to a historical anniversary, conference, etc.?
  8. The names of four to seven respected scholars in your field with whom you have no personal or professional relationship. Include their titles, affiliations, e-mail addresses, and/or mailing addresses.
  9. An indication of whether the manuscript is under consideration by other publishers.

Please do not send your entire manuscript.

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Jessica Bodoh-Creed is lecturer of anthropology at California State University.

Melissa King is assistant professor of anthropology at San Bernardino Valley College

Leonido Gines Jr. is lecturer of architecture at De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, and founder of studioGINES.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact: Jessica Bodoh-Creed ([email protected]), Leonido Gines Jr. ([email protected]), and Melissa King ([email protected])

Jul
26
Thu
2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society
Jul 26 – Jul 29 all-day

Call for Papers, Posters, and Organized Sessions: 2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society Portland, Oregon

July 26‐29, 2018

MEETING THEME: Science in Society, Society in Science – Toward a 21st Century Model for Social Scientific Research

Growing public skepticism about the value of science and expert knowledge has been a defining characteristic of the early 21st century. Critiques of science come from many sources – populist anti‐elite social movements, academic studies of conventional scientific methods and institutions, and advocates for a more participatory approach to knowledge production. As the distinction between ‘facts’ and ‘values’ has become blurred, the evidence‐base that informs current policy becomes increasingly contested territory. Notably, social scientists have long relied on evidence and scientific research to challenge popular misunderstandings of social problems like poverty, crime, racism, and sexism. At the same time, they have been at the forefront of critiques of the mainstream scientific enterprise and helped pioneer new approaches to research and engagement.

Professional social science societies (like RSS) have an obligation to support those who are studying and developing effective responses to the challenges faced by rural people and places in a globalized world. New models for scientific research will be increasingly important if our efforts are to inform public discourse and shape the development of effective public policies. To do this, we need to reconcile tensions between the desire to retain the power and insights of rigorous scientific methods, and our awareness of the societal biases associated with conventional scientific institutions. At the 2018 Annual Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, we particularly encourage attendees to present work that explores this vexing and enduring issue, and to provide examples of innovative approaches to applied scientific research on rural topics.

Over the last 80 years, the annual meetings of the RSS have been a venue for the exchange of ideas and information about a wide range of rural issues. Our attendees include faculty and students from diverse colleges and universities, researchers working in government or nonprofit institutions, and rural activists and practitioners. In addition to presentations on the meeting theme, we always invite presentations of research and engagement focused rural people, places and themes from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives.

Abstracts: Abstracts should be approximately 350‐500 words and briefly outline the purpose and theoretical framing of the paper, poster, program, or organized session. Where appropriate, include information about methods, data, and preliminary findings. The deadline for submitting papers, posters and sessions is Thursday, February 1, 2018, 11:59 pm (EST).

To submit, visit the “Annual Meetings” tab on the RSS website, www.ruralsociology.org.

Please contact the Program Chair, Kate MacTavish ([email protected]) or the RSS Business Office ([email protected]) with any questions about submission or to explore ideas for special events at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Sep
24
Mon
Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’
Sep 24 – Oct 2 all-day

Conference on ‘Folk Belief’ and ‘The Supernatural in Literature and Film’

24 September-02 October 2019, Svaneti & Tbilisi, Georgia

Why are some places especially prone to associations with the supernatural? Might it be because of liminal geographies, of the complex histories of ancient human landscapes, of fear about what lurks in the darkness? Are communities’ beliefs shaped by the environments in which they live, or does the recurrence of certain belief across environmental and geographic divides suggest that place is ultimately irrelevant? When we read a book or watch a film with supernatural themes, is the setting just window dressing, or can the mountains, the palaces, the forests, the skyscrapers be characters in their own right?

Previous conferences in this series have been held on remote islands (Shetland’s North Isles, 2014), in a hyper-dense city-state (Macau, 2015), and in the polar night (Svalbard, 2017). In 2019, the conference will go farther and higher than ever before, venturing up into the wild mountain valleys of and ancient cities of Georgia, a country at the crossroads of East and West.

This conference considers the themes of 1) folk belief, legends, and vernacular religion and 2) the supernatural in literature and film. We will combine academic presentations with explorations of communities in Georgia’s Svaneti and Tbilisi regions. Special emphasis will be given to the question of the role that ‘place’ plays in the conceptions of the supernatural: from folk narratives to local religious traditions; from the monsters, fairies, and witches of cinema to the miraculous in literature. Could these tales and customs occur just about anywhere? Or do they take place in the just the place they need to be?    

How to make attend and make a presentation.

Presentations are welcome on all aspects of of either folk belief or the supernatural in literature and film, though we encourage delegates to address the theme of the role of place in conceptions of the supernatural.Presentations last 15 minutes and will be followed by around 5 minutes’ question time. Note that, due to the ‘remote’ location of the conference, audio-visual aids will not be available for presentations.

The first deadline for abstracts is 30 September 2018. (Later abstracts may be accepted if there is room available at the conference, but people who submit an abstract prior to the deadline will have the first opportunity to reserve a spot and to take advantage of the early registration rate.) You can submit your abstract here. The deadline for early registration is 30 November 2018.