Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jan
31
Wed
CFP: The Human Image in a Changing World @ F1963 & Kiswire Center
Jan 31 all-day

Co-organized by:

Ministry of Education, Republic of Korea (MOE)
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF)
Korean National Commission for UNESCO
Busan Metropolitan City

The theme for the 5th World Humanities Forum is “The Human Image in a Changing World.” The very purpose of humanities research is to study humans, but the image of humans however, has gone through on-going changes not only throughout different time periods but also according to the various local situations. Therefore it is important that we primarily capture human images and then document the characteristics of the human images from past to present in various academic and ordinary lives.

The theme of “The Human Image in a Changing World” seeks to examine the imbrications of human images across time and space, in order to redefine the ways in which humanities have been envisioned, particularly to visualize the various ways in which humanities engage with the cultural processes in the past, present, and future. Literature, visual arts, and new media have always taken the leading and guiding role in representing the human image as imagined and understood by the public. Historians have frequently been at the forefront of analyzing the dynamics of differences in human images in the continuum of time. Philosophers have generated profound yet varying discourses on how human images have been thought differently in terms of a philosophical relationship with nature, gender, and bodies. The emergence of the robotic industry and artificial intelligence demands investigation in order to recognize the human image, especially in the 21st century. Above all, it is crucial to discover human images as they are, and reflect them thoughtfully from various insights.

All humanities research, in its essence, explores human images that have evolved over time. It is the fundamental premise of our humanities research to understand the changing human images of today. We hope to explore and share distinctive human images, and hence develop new directions of humanities research for future generations.

Additional Roles

Participants applying are welcome to take on additional roles as moderator and commentator during the forum. Please check the boxes if you are able to moderate a session or be a commentator for other presentations.

Moderator

The moderator has the important role of overseeing the session. For a successful session, the moderator will be responsible for the following: 1) Give a short introduction of the speakers, 2) manage the time for each presentation and, 3) briefly summarize each presentation and facilitate the discussion.

Commentator

Presenters participating in the WHF are welcome to be commentators in other sessions. Around 2~3 commentators will be present at each session and give their opinion at the end of the presentation to begin the discussions.

Proposal Deadline

January 31, 2018

Funding

The World Humanities Forum will provide full support for flight and accommodation for the period of the Forum to all authors invited to present at the Forum.

Feb
9
Fri
The CALA (2019) Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology
Feb 9 all-day

Full Title: Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology 1

Short Title: CALA 1 (2019)

Location:
Siem Reap, Cambodia

Start Date:
23-Jan-2019 – 26-Jan-2019

Contact: Professor Susan Hagadorn

Meeting Email: [email protected]

Meeting URL: http://cala2019.puc.edu.kh

Meeting Description: 

The Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, The CALA 1 (2019), in Cambodia, symbolizes a significant movement forward for Linguistic Anthropology, and in problematizing current perspectives and praxis in the field of Asian Linguistic Anthropology.

The CALA seeks to respond to concerns by those within respective fields, Linguistics, Anthropology, Sociolinguistics, Sociology, Cultural studies, and of course Linguistic Anthropology These concerns include the reduced (opportunity for) focus on Asian regions and work by Asian academics, largely contributable to issues of funding and expertise. These concerns also include that academics globally seek to both work on Asian regions and with Asian regions, but impeded by the absence of appropriate networks.

The CALA 1 thus aims to begin an era within which to opportune these academics to transfer knowledge, expertise, and valuable Linguistic and Anthropological Data across the world, through the interpersonal and inter-institutional networks the CALA conferences seek to build.

To ground these efforts, the Conference, at The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia at the centre, seeks to network a growing number of Institutions globally, to support this much needed project.

The theme for the inaugural CALA is ‘Revitalization and Representation‘, a theme pertinent to the current state of many Asian regions and countries vis-a-vis their global analogues.

Emerging from a complex weaving for received and produced colonializations, the languages and ethnicities within Asia have experienced strong curtailment and denigration, to the point where many have reached near extinction, while others have passed the point of extinction. Here, these languages and ethnicities require urgent revitalization through an anthropological set of approaches, in collaboration with academic, and non-academic, networks globally. Revitalization can be engendered effectively through the complex channels associated with and effected through the extensive and vast work developed in Representation. Cambodia seems to be at the centre of this need for focus, with many ethnicities and their languages currently on the brink of extinction, and with several now having less than ten living speakers.

Though The Paññāsāstra University of Cambodia will host the Inaugural conference in 2019, in Siem Reap, the conference will be hosted by a different Institution globally, annually, while Paññāsāstra remains at the helm of the Conference, so to collaborate with all institutions wishing to involve themselves with and in the CALA network.

We thus welcome you to the CALA 1, in 2019, the Inaugural Conference on Asian Linguistic Anthropology, and to the CALA in general.

Important dates:

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Opens: Friday, October 13, 2017 at midnight (UTC Time)
Closes: Monday, February 9, 2018 at midnight (UTC Time)
________________________________

NOTIFICATION OF ACCEPTANCE

By March 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
________________________________

REGISTRATION

Early Bird
Opens: February 10, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: May 14, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Normal Bird
Opens: May 15, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: August 25, 2018, midnight (UTC)

Late Bird
Opens: August 26, 2018, midnight (UTC)
Closes: January 26, 2019, (Conference end)
________________________________

CONFERENCE DATES

Wednesday January 23rd, 2019
Thursday January 24th, 2019
Friday January 25th, 2019
Saturday January 26th, 2019
Subfields:

  • Anthropological linguistics
  • Applied sociolinguistics
  • Cognitive Anthropology and language
  • Critical Linguistic Anthropology
  • Post-structuralism and language
  • Semiotics and semiology
  • Language documentation
  • General sociolinguistics
  • Language socialization
  • Social psychology of language
  • Language revitalization
  • Ethnography of communication
  • Language, community, ethnicity
  • Language, dialect, sociolect, genre
  • Nonverbal semiotics
  • Multifunctionality
  • Language and embodiment
  • Documenting language
  • Ethnographical language work
  • Language, gender, sexuality
  • Language ideologies
  • Narrative and metanarrative
  • Language and spatial and temporal frames
  • Language minorities and majorities
  • Language in real and virtual spaces

Language contact and change

Feb
20
Tue
Call for Papers: 2018 International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences Meetings
Feb 20 all-day

The International Women’s Anthropology Conference (IWAC) is hosting a panel at the July 2018 meetings of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES) in Florianopolis, Brazil.

PANEL TOPIC: Women of Marginalized Social Groups Working to Empower Themselves

PANEL THEMES AND FOCUS: This panel will consist of orally presented papers. Panelists will discuss challenges facing women of socially marginalized groups in multiple countries – for example, indigenous women, low caste women in South Asia, and women in socially marginalized ethnicities, racial groups, or economic classes of other countries, depending on speakers’ availability and expertise. The emphasis will be on women’s advocacy activities and self-help organizations. The goal of the discussion is to consider ways that very low status women can and do strengthen their social position and claim their human rights, sharing the experiences of people of different countries. The panel relates to three IUAES conference themes: Practice and Advocacy, Race and Ethnicity, and Women/Gender.

CONVENORS: Dr. Suzanne Hanchett (Planning Alternatives for Change LLC) and Dra. Jenniffer Simpson (University of Coimbra)

LANGUAGES: English, Portuguese with English titled slides

DATES OF THE IUAES MEETINGS: July 16–20, 2018

LOCATION: Florianopolis, Brazil

DEADLINES: We must submit all paper proposals to IUAES before Feb. 28, 2018

Please send expressions of interest as soon as possible. Send a 50100 word  summary of your paper topic on or before Feb. 20  to:

Dr. Suzanne Hanchett ([email protected]) English language communications

(or) Dra. Jenniffer Simpson ([email protected]) Portuguese communications

IUAES will review and accept our abstracts before March 15, 2018

After their papers are accepted, speakers will be expected to register in advance for the conference, to guarantee their participation.

IWAC website: planningalternatives.com/iwac-women

Mar
1
Thu
Thinking Gender, Pre-existing Conditions
Mar 1 – Mar 2 all-day

Thinking Gender, Pre-existing Conditions

28th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference

March 1-2, 2018

UCLA Faculty Center

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Terri Conley, Associate Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan

FEATURED WORKSHOP: Trauma-Informed Yoga led by Zabie Yamasaki, Program Director of Trauma-Informed Yoga Programs at UCLA

 

The UCLA Center for the Study of Women invites submissions of paper, poster, speed pitching research roundtable, and visual arts proposals for our 28th Annual Thinking Gender Graduate Student Research Conference. This year’s conference theme, Pre-existing Conditions, will focus on the interactions of health and gender as a play on the current, on-going discussions about gender-focused health and healthcare. Pre-existing Conditions invites conversations about the directions and foci of intersectional and multi-contextual approaches to health and well-being. With our focus on gender and health, Thinking Gender 2018, Pre-existing Conditions, welcomes submissions of graduate student projects on a wide range of health and health-related topics (see the attached call or visit http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP for details).

 

Deadline for All Proposal Submissions: November 1, 2017

Submission Information

We invite proposal submissions for the following categories:

  • Panel Presentations
  • Posters
  • Speed Pitching Research Roundtables
  • Visual Arts Reception and Exhibition

Registered graduate students from any institution are eligible to submit presentation proposals for all Thinking Gender sessions, including the panel, poster, speed pitching research roundtable, and Visual Arts Reception & Exhibition sessions.

Registered undergraduate students from any institution are eligible to submit proposals for poster presentations and participation in the Visual Arts Reception & Exhibition only.

Full details – including proposal length requirements and additional specifications – are available in the attached call for proposals and on our website at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP.

To participate in Thinking Gender, successful applicants will be required to pay a registration fee of $50, the entirety of which will go towards covering conference costs. Participants for whom the registration fee is prohibitive are encouraged to contact [email protected].

Deadlines

The deadline for all submission proposals is November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made online via the link at http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP. Once submissions are reviewed and accepted, all participants in the paper panel sessions will be required to submit a draft of their paper by January 29, 2018, for pre-circulation among their co-panelists and faculty moderator.

For full details, including proposal length requirements, additional specifications, and a link to the online submission system, visit http://csw.ucla.edu/TG18CFP.

Mar
7
Wed
Anthrosophia 2018
Mar 7 – Mar 10 all-day

ANTHROSOPHIA 2018: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Philosophy, Anthropology, and Allied Disciplines

Dates:                     March 7–10, 2018

Location:               Center for Human-Environmental Research

3400 St. Claude Ave., New Orleans, LA 70117

 

Founded in 2015, Anthrosophia is an annual interdisciplinary conference bridging the fields of philosophy, anthropology, and allied social sciences. The conference is dedicated to the holistic investigation of the questions of how and why human societies organize themselves in the diverse ways that we do today, and have done in the past. The basic premise of Anthrosophia is that the fields of philosophy and anthropology have much more in common than is typically acknowledged. Philosophical claims about humans and human societies had to start somewhere and, indeed, they usually began as basic empirical generalizations about the nature of human behavior. Anthropology began as an offshoot from the field philosophy in the early 19th century and it continues to carry the same fundamental set of theoretical building blocks with it into the present day.

As an interdisciplinary conference, Anthrosophia aims to articulate the theoretical principles, methodological orientations, and empirical data that form the basis of philosophy and anthropology as traditionally distinct fields. Through this collaboration, we hope to identify persistent shortcomings and biases in our thinking about the nature of human social life and to find better ways forward.

Participants may give oral presentations of up to 20 minutes. If you wish to present a paper, we ask you to submit a 150-word abstract outlining your topic to [email protected] by January 2nd. Please also indicate your preference about which day you would like to present. (We do our best to accommodate these preferences but we can’t make any promises!)

The Anthrosophia scholarly society also publishes a journal of the same name. Papers presented at the Anthrosophia conference may be considered for publication in this journal, though we also accept unrelated submissions. For more information about the Anthrosophia conference and the journal, please visit http: //www.cherscience.org.

 

Conference Program Committee: Drew Chastain (co-chair), Loyola University New Orleans; Grant S. McCall (co-chair), C.H.E.R. and Tulane University; Karl Widerquist, Georgetown University SFS-Qatar; Enzo Rossi, University of Amsterdam

Any questions about the conference should be directed to [email protected]rg.

 

 

Registration:

Student/unemployed registration:                 $25

Junior professional registration:                    $50 (Postdocs, Assistant Professors, etc.)

Senior professional registration:                   $100 (Associate and Full Professors, etc.)

 

*We ask that all conference participants remit registration fees as stated above. If these fees are a hardship and might prevent you from participating, please email [email protected] to request a reduction.

Mar
16
Fri
2018 National Humanities Conference Call for Proposals is Now Available
Mar 16 all-day

We are pleased to announce that the Call for Proposals for the 2018 National Humanities Conference is now available! The conference, to be held November 8-11, 2018 in New Orleans, in conjunction with the city’s tricentennial celebration.

Click here for the Call for Proposals. We welcome proposals for sessions, individual lightning talks, and working groups.

The National Humanities Conference brings together the public humanities and academia to explore opportunities and challenges, learn about collaborations and best practices, and strengthen America’s humanities network.The National Humanities Conference is co-hosted by the National Humanities Alliance and the Federation of State Humanities Councils. To learn more about the conference, click here.

We encourage you to submit proposals and recruit others to do the same! Please contact Beatrice Gurwitz at [email protected] with any questions or for support in building sessions.

Registration is open for NHA Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day

Help us build on last year’s momentum and push for funding increases for the National Endowment for the Humanities and other federal funding streams.

Register today for the 2018 National Humanities Alliance Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day!

March 11-13, 2018

Washington Court Hotel and Capitol Hill

Washington, D.C.

Early registration ends January 12. Register now at a reduced rate.

Click here to learn more about the NHA Annual Meeting and Humanities Advocacy Day.

Click here to reserve a room in the conference hotel. Availability is limited.

Apr
27
Fri
International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics
Apr 27 all-day

International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics

On behalf of the Organization Committee, we are pleased to invite you to the International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics (ICFAEC 2018) which will be held on 27-28th April 2018 in Alanya, Turkey.

ICFAEC 2018 aims at disseminating new knowledge in the field economics and provides a forum for deliberations and exchange of knowledge among academics, organizations, and researchers. ICFAEC 2018 encourages submission of theoretical and empirical papers in the different domains of food and agricultural economics and related disciplines, within and across different levels of analysis. ICFAEC 2018 focuses on are: 

  • Food Economics
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Food Policy
  • Agricultural Management
  • Farm Management
  • Rural Development
  • Sustainable Development
  • Farming Systems
  • Agricultural Policy
  • Agribusiness
  • Socio-economic Aspects
  • Food Marketing
  • Rural & Agricultural Sociology
  • Agricultural Extension
  • Agritourism
  • Financing credits and agricultural subsidies
  • Logistics of agricultural production
  • Research and development
  • Irrigation and water management

We look forward to greeting you at the International Conference on Food and Agricultural Economics (ICFAEC 2018) in Alanya, Turkey.

For more information about the conference organization, please check this web page. www.ageconalanya.com

Important Dates

Submission Deadline of Abstracts: January 20th, 2018
Notification of Acceptance/Rejection:  With in 4 weeks of submission time
Submission Deadline of Full Papers: February 20th, 2018
Deadline of Early Bird Registration: March 1sh, 2018

Best regards,

ICFAEC Oganizing Committee

Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Faculty of Business, Department of Economics and Finance, 07400 Alanya/Antalya-Turkey, Tel:+ (90) 242 518 21 21-1236, Fax : +(90) 242 518 20 25

Emails:  [email protected]

Jun
30
Sat
Call for Proposals: Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life
Jun 30 all-day

Culture, Humanity, and Urban Life

ABOUT THE SERIES:

How are urban processes entangled with human experiences? In this series, scholarly monographs and edited volumes explore this question and illuminate diverse forms of such entanglement through empirically-based research. This series emphasizes anthropological approaches to the study of human life in relation to the urban. It seeks to illuminate experiences and effects of urban cultures and situate specific cases in a comparative set. By exploring the intricacies of human-urban relations, this series contributes to better understanding of the ways that humans particularly conceive of and experience nature, personhood, ethics, culture, and social life.

PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

To submit a manuscript for consideration by Lexington Books, please send:

  • a prospectus (see below for details)
  • a detailed table of contents
  • one or two sample chapters
  • your curriculum vitae

If you are proposing a contributed volume, please include titles, affiliations, and brief resumes for each of the contributors, as well as chapter abstracts.

The prospectus should include:

  1. A description of the book, describing the core themes, arguments, issues, goals, and/or topics of the work, what makes it unique, what questions it seeks to answer, and why you are qualified to write it. (2-5 pages)
  2. A description of your target audience (undergraduate or graduate students? scholars? professionals?).
  3. An analysis of competing or similar books (including publishers and dates), indicating distinctive and original elements of your project that set it apart from these other works.
  4. A list of courses in which your book might be used as a text or supplementary text, indicating the course level at which this book may be used.
  5. An indication of whether any part of your manuscript has been published previously, and if it is a doctoral dissertation, what changes you are proposing to prepare it for publication.
  6. The length of the manuscript either as a word count or a page count (12-point type on double-spaced 8.5”×11” pages). Will there be figures, tables, or other non-text material, and, if so, approximately how many? If the text is not complete, please still estimate its final length, not including the non-text material.
  7. If the manuscript is not complete, an estimation of when it will be finished. Is there a particular date by which you hope the book will be published (due to a historical anniversary, conference, etc.?
  8. The names of four to seven respected scholars in your field with whom you have no personal or professional relationship. Include their titles, affiliations, e-mail addresses, and/or mailing addresses.
  9. An indication of whether the manuscript is under consideration by other publishers.

Please do not send your entire manuscript.

ABOUT THE EDITORS:

Jessica Bodoh-Creed is lecturer of anthropology at California State University.

Melissa King is assistant professor of anthropology at San Bernardino Valley College

Leonido Gines Jr. is lecturer of architecture at De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, and founder of studioGINES.

If you are interested in submitting a proposal, please contact: Jessica Bodoh-Creed ([email protected]), Leonido Gines Jr. ([email protected]), and Melissa King ([email protected])

Jul
26
Thu
2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society
Jul 26 – Jul 29 all-day

Call for Papers, Posters, and Organized Sessions: 2018 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society Portland, Oregon

July 26‐29, 2018

MEETING THEME: Science in Society, Society in Science – Toward a 21st Century Model for Social Scientific Research

Growing public skepticism about the value of science and expert knowledge has been a defining characteristic of the early 21st century. Critiques of science come from many sources – populist anti‐elite social movements, academic studies of conventional scientific methods and institutions, and advocates for a more participatory approach to knowledge production. As the distinction between ‘facts’ and ‘values’ has become blurred, the evidence‐base that informs current policy becomes increasingly contested territory. Notably, social scientists have long relied on evidence and scientific research to challenge popular misunderstandings of social problems like poverty, crime, racism, and sexism. At the same time, they have been at the forefront of critiques of the mainstream scientific enterprise and helped pioneer new approaches to research and engagement.

Professional social science societies (like RSS) have an obligation to support those who are studying and developing effective responses to the challenges faced by rural people and places in a globalized world. New models for scientific research will be increasingly important if our efforts are to inform public discourse and shape the development of effective public policies. To do this, we need to reconcile tensions between the desire to retain the power and insights of rigorous scientific methods, and our awareness of the societal biases associated with conventional scientific institutions. At the 2018 Annual Meetings of the Rural Sociological Society, we particularly encourage attendees to present work that explores this vexing and enduring issue, and to provide examples of innovative approaches to applied scientific research on rural topics.

Over the last 80 years, the annual meetings of the RSS have been a venue for the exchange of ideas and information about a wide range of rural issues. Our attendees include faculty and students from diverse colleges and universities, researchers working in government or nonprofit institutions, and rural activists and practitioners. In addition to presentations on the meeting theme, we always invite presentations of research and engagement focused rural people, places and themes from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives.

Abstracts: Abstracts should be approximately 350‐500 words and briefly outline the purpose and theoretical framing of the paper, poster, program, or organized session. Where appropriate, include information about methods, data, and preliminary findings. The deadline for submitting papers, posters and sessions is Thursday, February 1, 2018, 11:59 pm (EST).

To submit, visit the “Annual Meetings” tab on the RSS website, www.ruralsociology.org.

Please contact the Program Chair, Kate MacTavish ([email protected]) or the RSS Business Office ([email protected]) with any questions about submission or to explore ideas for special events at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

Aug
20
Mon
Changing Global Hierarchies of Value? Museums, artifacts , frames, and flows
Aug 20 – Aug 22 all-day

Call for papers for the international conference 

Changing Global Hierarchies of Value? Museums, artifacts , frames, and flows

University of Copenhagen / National Museum of Denmark, 20–22 August, 2018

Museums are said to classify the world; but the world is changing, and so are the museum worlds and the worlds of arts and artefacts. This conference explores how the world is imagined and classified through the presentation, interpretation and classification of artifacts; and how the global hierarchy of value (cf. Herzfeld 2004) might be changing in through these flows and circulations.

In 2007, the German art historian Hans Belting coined the term “global art” to indicate that contemporary art was no longer the province of artists in the Global North, thus signaling a sea change in the international art world (Belting, in Weibel and Buddensieg 2007). Art historians, prior to Belting had long stipulated that the birth of modern art in 19th and 20th century Europe was partially predicated on inspirations from outside Europe in the guise of Orientalism, Chinoiserie, Japonisme, or “primitivism,” yet these modern artists were almost exclusively from Europe and—later—North America. Non-European artists went largely unnamed and unrecognized, as French surrealist poet André Breton’s famous mur d’atelier revealed. Modern art from the Global South or rapidly modernizing states in Eurasia and East Asia, was often dismissed as derivative of Western art, while contemporary traditional art was considered inauthentic (cf. Kasfir 1992).

Simultaneously, anthropologist Michael Herzfeld (2004) coined the term “global hierarchy of value” to denote the global cultural asymmetry that constituted the cultural successor to the political and military domination of European colonial systems. In the arts, early partial exceptions were Latin America, which—as the historical product of creole nationalisms (cf. Anderson 1982) and hence as a “pseudo-Europe” – saw the emergence of successful artists like Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo and of movements like Brazilian modernism and neo-concretism; and Japan, which experimented with locally inflected, but modern, architecture. The imbalance in the Euro-centered art world changed when the Magiciens de la Terre exhibition was held in Paris (1989) and featured contemporary art by both Western and non-Western—and named—artists in equal numbers, albeit without implying an equal hierarchy of value.

The Magiciens de la Terre exhibition marked the coming out of contemporary artists from Asia, Africa, Latin America and Oceania on the global arts scene, and brought out in their participation in numerous exhibitions such as the Modernités plurielles at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, but also in biennales, art festivals, art fairs, and auctions around the world. Simultaneously, art institutions and events outside of Europe and North America gained in global prominence, by adopting the cultural forms, classificatory devices and exhibitionary technologies developed in Euro-America and applying those in their own contexts and for their own purposes. One could say that while the modern period witnessed the emergence of a global Europe, the current “post-postcolonial” period is marked by the globalization of the other continents—at least in terms of the arts: in that sense it is increasingly possible to speak of global Asia, global Africa, global Latin America as geographic entities that challenge the global hierarchy of value. 

At the same time, recent decades have seen the unfolding of increasingly interconnected global networks of production, labor, consumption, and capital accumulation, a process broadly known as globalization. But can we also talk of a globalized taste regime or set of preferences à la Bourdieu? Are recently booming or expanding global players in Asia, Africa, and Latin America reconfiguring the relative value of styles, objects, or traditional artifacts, thereby challenging the old Eurocentric order and organization of the good and the beautiful? Even if the West remains the universal unmarked, attention should be given to the ways in which it is now often amplified, mocked, or ironized by non-Western masters of its artistic, architectural, or artisanal forms. How is globalization affecting existing or emerging museums as economic and commercial players in a world of accelerating mass tourism and brand fixation? How is the complex past of European interaction and Eurocentric notions of cosmopolitanism rethought and exhibited today in postcolonial theaters of historical encounter, exchange, or conflict?    

This is the final conference of the project ‘Global Europe: Constituting Europe from the Outside In through Artefacts’ (see http://globaleurope.ku.dk/). The Global Europe project explores how the collection, circulation, classification and museum exhibition of objects define Europe from the outside in during Europe’s present loss of global hegemony—especially in relation to Japan and four non-European BRICS countries (Brazil, China, India, South Africa), in comparison with the early modern period of European ascendancy. This ‘Changing Global Hierarchies of Value?’ conference invites both paper proposals on a range of topics that explore global networks of valuation and validation and their local forms and entanglements in the current period. The papers are expected to be empirically grounded, and may—but do not have to—refer to the five countries targeted by the Global Europe project.

The keynote speech titled Museum Transactions: Negotiating Knowledges, Governing Cultures will be presented by Professor Tony Bennett of the Institute for Culture and Society of the Western Sydney University in Australia. Tony Bennett is the author of—among many other works—The birth of the museum: history, theory, politics (1995), Pasts beyond memories: evolution, museums, colonialism (2004), and Making culture, changing society (2013); and he currently leads the project ‘Museum, Field, Metropolis, Colony: Practices of Social Governance.’ For more information, please see https://www.westernsydney.edu.au/ics/people/researchers/tony_bennett.

The conference is convened by Prof Oscar Salemink, Amélia Siegel Corrêa PhD, Jens Sejrup PhD, Caroline Lillelund and Vibe Nielsen, who make up the research team for the Global Europe project.

Please send your abstract (300 words max) and short bio (300 words max)  to Marie Yoshida [email protected] before April 1, 2018. For inquiries, please contact Oscar Salemink [email protected].