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Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Aug
1
Wed
2019 Fulbright Grant – University of Zambia
Aug 1 all-day

Grant Details

GRANT ACTIVITY
Teach undergraduate courses. Provide tutorials, assist with student advising and contribute to curriculum development. Contribute to faculty mentoring and training. Give seminars, workshops and public lectures. Conduct research in area of specialization.

In addition to being a prestigious academic exchange program, the Fulbright Program is designed to expand and strengthen relationships between the people of the United States and citizens of other nations and to promote international understanding and cooperation. To support this mission, Fulbright Scholars will be asked to give public talks, mentor students, and otherwise engage with the host community, in addition to their primary activities‎.

GRANT LENGTH
10 months

GRANT DATES
October 2019

LOCATIONS
University of Zambia

FLEX OPTION
No

DISCIPLINE TYPE
Applications are sought in all appropriate disciplines, but applications in the following disciplines are preferred:

DISCIPLINES
Anthropology
Area Studies
Business Administration
Communications
Economics
Engineering
Information Sciences
Political Science
Public Administration

SPECIALIZATIONS
Accounting, small business management, financial economics, international finance, international relations, management, marketing, public administration, engineering, leadership and governance, economic and political anthropology or political science, elections, democracy and governance, corruption, education policy, gender issues and agriculture policy.


Application Requirements

INVITATION REQUIREMENT
A letter of invitation is strongly preferred
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS
All teaching and research will be in English; additional language proficiency not required.

Applicant Profile

PROFESSIONAL PROFILE
Open to academics and appropriately qualified professionals outside of academia
ADDITIONAL QUALIFICATION INFORMATION
Scholars with a Ph.D., at least five years of postdoctoral university or college teaching experience and previous experience in Africa are preferred.


Additional Information

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS
Candidates are encouraged to correspond with the potential host department to determine if their discipline or specializations are of interest. Applicants should have well-developed research projects to which they can devote themselves in the event that university classes are suspended. A letter of invitation from the host institution, submitted as part of the application, is recommended but not required. Grant start dates may be subject to change depending on local conditions and the academic calendar at the host institution.
Sep
30
Sun
2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop
Sep 30 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: 2019 HWW National Predoctoral Career Diversity Residential Summer Workshop

Humanities Without Walls (HWW) is a consortium of humanities centers and institutes at 15 major research universities throughout the Midwest and beyond. Based at the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), the HWW consortium is funded by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

In summer 2019, HWW is holding its second national, in-residence summer workshop for doctoral students interested in learning about careers outside of the academy and/or the tenure track system. Chicago Humanities Festival (CHF)—a leading public humanities organization—designs and runs the summer workshop in consultation with HWW. Through a series of workshops, talks, and field trips, participants learn how to leverage their skills and training towards careers in the private sector, the non-profit world, arts administration, public media and many other fields.

We invite applications from doctoral students pursuing degree in the humanities and humanistic social sciences to participate in this three-week, in-residence summer workshop. This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be made to HWW by each university. To be considered, interested doctoral students must submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018.

About the Workshop: Launched in 2015 as an initiative of the HWW consortium, the workshop welcomes thirty participants each summer from higher education institutions across the United States. HWW Summer Workshop Fellows work in a variety of academic disciplines. They are scholars and practitioners who bring experience in community building, museum curation, filmmaking, radio programming, social media, project management, research, writing, and teaching. They are invested in issues of social justice and seek ways to bring humanistic values, insights, and skills to the public and private sectors.

In the spirit of practice-oriented learning, HWW and CHF partner with entities such as IDEO, a design and consulting firm, to lead students in real-world problem-solving exercises around important contemporary issues. Recognizing that each fellow’s skillset has been primarily oriented toward an academic track, the workshop includes sessions on values-based career planning, resume and cover letter construction, networking, and social media strategies from experts in career development.

Graduates from the workshop will emerge with a network of contacts in a range of professional realms; a significantly broadened sense of the career possibilities that await humanities PhDs; a cohort of HWW Summer Workshop Fellows (and friends!) from whom they may draw support and advice; and a set of resources aimed at helping them advance into the various realms considered under the broad rubric of “the public humanities.”

Where: Chicago, Illinois. Most weekday workshop events will take place at the Genevieve and Wayne Gratz Center at Fourth Presbyterian Church, 126 E. Chestnut St (at N. Michigan Ave.). The workshop also includes site visit to organizations around the city.

This is an in-residence workshop. As such, all participants, regardless of regular place of domicile, will be housed in private apartments. The costs of lodging are included in the fellowship. Staying in the provided housing is required as a condition of acceptance this fellowship. Details about lodging will be provided to those selected for the workshop.

When: Summer 2019—July 15th through August 2nd. Workshop sessions take place from approximately 9am to 5pm, Monday through Friday, for three weeks. Fellows are required to attend all workshop events and are strongly discouraged from traveling during the workshop. While there are no events scheduled during weekends, the CHF will circulate a list of interesting and exciting activities happening around Chicago that students are welcome to explore on their own.

Eligibility: All applicants must be enrolled in a doctoral degree program in a humanities or humanistic social science discipline at a PhD-granting institution within the United States. Applicants may be at any stage of their doctoral work, but they cannot have already received the doctoral degree at the time the workshop takes place. Ideally, applicants will have completed some coursework towards their doctoral degree, and they may have been advanced to candidacy but are not yet finishing their dissertations. International students are eligible to apply, but are responsible for confirming their registration and eligibility status at their home universities; HWW is not responsible for issuing visa paperwork.

Fellowship Prize: Each fellow will receive a $5,000 prize intended to cover travel to and from the summer workshop, most meals, and all incidentals. Fellows will be expected to arrange and pay for their own travel using the funds from this prize. The Chicago Humanities Festival will be arranging housing for all fellows in Chicago near the Gratz Center. All fellows are expected to attend the entire workshop for the entire three weeks and to stay in the provided housing.

Application Requirements: Interested doctoral students in the humanities should submit their applications to their home universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Combine and submit all application materials as a single PDF file.

The application file should contain:

  • A completed application cover sheet.
  • A narrative (1,000 words maximum) explaining the applicant’s intended career trajectory and addressing the following questions:
    • What is your experience with the “public humanities”?
    • Why are you interested in attending the workshop?
    • What kinds of knowledge are you seeking from the workshop?
    • What do you hope to achieve as a result of attending the workshop?
    • How do you envision sharing what you learn at the workshop with your department, campus, and beyond?
  • CV (two pages maximum),
  • Two letters of recommendation. One letter should be from the applicant’s primary adviser/dissertation chair; both should emphasize the applicant’s fit for this workshop.

Application Procedures: This is a limited-submission application. Eligible doctoral students must be nominated for this fellowship by their home institutions, and only one nomination may be subnitted to HWW from any given university.

Interested students must submit the application materials listed above to their universities’ humanities center director, graduate college dean, or equivalent by September 30th, 2018. Please do not submit your applications directly to HWW.

Humanities Center Directors, Graduate College Deans, or equivalents should submit the application for their nominee by 5:00 pm CDT on November 2nd, 2018. Applications should be submitted to [email protected] as a single PDF file attached to an email with the subject line “2019 Predoc Application.”

Announcement of fellowship awards will be made in January 2019. All questions should be directed to Jason Mierek, Director of Operations of the HWW Consortium, at [email protected].

Oct
5
Fri
Call for Applications: The Berlin Prize 2019/2020
Oct 5 all-day

The American Academy in Berlin invites applications for its residential fellowships for the academic year 2019/2020.

The Academy seeks to enrich transatlantic dialogue in the arts, humanities, and public policy through the development and communication of projects of the highest scholarly merit. For 2019/2020, the Academy is also interested in considering projects that address the themes of migration and social integration, questions of race in comparative perspective, and the interplay of exile and return.

For all projects, the Academy asks that candidates explain the relevance of a stay in Berlin to the development of their work.

Approximately 20 Berlin Prizes are conferred annually. Past recipients have included art historians, anthropologists, historians, musicologists, journalists, writers, filmmakers, sociologists, legal scholars, economists, and public policy experts, among others. Fellowships are typically awarded for an academic semester, but shorter stays of six to eight weeks are also possible. Benefits include round-trip airfare, partial board, a $5,000 monthly stipend, and accommodations at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center in the Berlin-Wannsee district.

Fellowships are restricted to US citizens and permanent residents. Candidates in academic disciplines must have completed a PhD at the time of application. Candidates working in other fields—such as journalism, film, law, or public policy—must have equivalent professional degrees. Writers should have published at least one book at the time of application.

Please note that Berlin Prizes for visual artists, composers, and poets are determined in invitation-only competitions.

We will accept applications as of late May 2018. Following a peer-reviewed evaluation process, an independent Selection Committee reviews finalist applications. The 2019/2020 Berlin Prizes will be announced in late April 2019.

For further information and to apply online, please see: http://www.americanacademy.de/apply/apply-for-a-fellowship/

The application deadline for 2019/20 is Friday, October 5, 2018 (12 noon EST or 6 pm CET).

Oct
24
Wed
2019-20 Mellon/ACLS Scholars & Society Fellowships
Oct 24 all-day

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) is pleased to announce a new initiative to advance publicly engaged scholarship in the humanities. The Mellon/ACLS Scholars & Society program, made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will support humanities scholars who seek to partner with nonacademic organizations in their research and encourage innovation in doctoral education at their universities.

Inspired by the Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows program, which demonstrates the dynamic value of doctoral education by placing recent humanities PhDs in top nonprofit and government organizations, the Scholars & Society program will encourage faculty to explore connections between humanities research and broader society while in residence at a US-based cultural, media, government, policy, or community organization of their choice. The fellowships also provide resources and training that will enable fellows to incorporate best practices of public scholarship into doctoral education on their campuses. ACLS developed the program in consultation with academic and nonprofit leaders with extensive experience in the realm of publicly engaged scholarship.

“Just as ACLS strives to increase funding for core humanities research through a variety of fellowship and grant programs, we also recognize the urgent need to promote the broader circulation of that knowledge across all sectors of society,” said John Paul Christy, director of public programs at ACLS. “We look forward to supporting scholars who can be ambassadors for the humanities beyond their campus communities, and who will instill an ethos of reflective public engagement in their scholarship for years to come.”

The fellowships are open to faculty who hold tenured positions in PhD-granting departments or programs at universities in the United States. In the pilot year of the program, ACLS will award 12 fellowships for the 2019-20 academic year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $75,000, plus funds for research, travel, and related project and hosting costs.

The goal of the fellowship year should be a major research project in the humanities or humanistic social sciences that treats a significant issue in society, such as democratic governance; technological change; racism and inequality; environmental change; economic exclusion; or migration and immigration, to name just a few possibilities. Fellows will select host organizations based on their capacity to advance their research.

Fellows will participate in two workshops over the course of the fellowship year. These workshops will encourage collaboration between scholars and organizations engaged in public scholarship and will support institution-building efforts to train humanities faculty and doctoral students who are interested in developing research agendas that have purchase both inside and outside of the academy.

Proposals must be submitted through ACLS’s online application system, which will begin accepting applications in late July. Further information about the program, including eligibility criteria and FAQ, is available online here. The application deadline is October 24, 2018.

Contact: [email protected]

Dec
1
Sat
Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy Research Grant in the Social Sciences
Dec 1 all-day

The Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy was established in 1997 to support the advancement of research and understanding in the major fields of the social sciences, which include psychology, anthropology, sociology, economics, urban affairs, area studies, and political science.

Through its grants program, the foundation awards grants of $7,500 — $5,000 at the start of the project and $2,500 at its completion — to Ph.D. candidates in support of dissertations that address contemporary issues in the social sciences. Special Awards are offered to grant recipients for the most outstanding research project in specific subject-matter areas. Recipients of these awards receive an additional $1,500 – $5,000.

Applicants are not required to be a citizen or resident of the United States; however, grants are limited to aspiring PhD students at the dissertation level whose project has received approval from their appropriate department head/university

May
1
Wed
2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies
May 1 all-day

2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is pleased to announce that the 2019 ACIP workshop will be African Ethnographies. The project was proposed and will be organized by colleagues at the University of the Western Cape, Jung Ran Annachiara Forte (Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology) and Sakhumzi Mfecane (Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology and Sociology). Activities will take place in Cape Town, South Africa.

African Ethnographies
While the practice of ethnography has a long history in Africa, insufficient debate has emerged around it recently on the African continent. Far from being specific only to anthropology, ethnography has become a widespread mode of knowing inside and outside academic spaces. We would like to prompt reflection around this concept and practice, which is slippery, changing, dense, polysemic, and composed of a plurality of voices. The African Ethnographies workshop will raise questions about ethnography across disciplines, its contemporary forms – not exclusively written, and its publics. Ethnography enables conceptual work that transcends simple divides between the empirical, the methodological, and the theoretical. The workshop is particularly interested in understanding how ethnography and its conceptual work can allow us to grasp the complexities of contemporary African worlds, their precariousness, and their becomings. We are interested in exploring: (1) the work of theorization that ethnography makes possible; (2) understandings of public ethnography today; and finally (3) ways to re-rethink ethnography from the African continent. The workshop seeks to open a space of dialogue by bringing together emerging scholars across different disciplines and from institutions across Africa. By engaging in discussions around theory, methods, public engagements, and ethnographic sensibilities and modes of expression, we hope to better understand the challenges of doing ethnography in Africa’s contemporary worlds. The workshop will include a performance/ lecture that explores the performative potential of ethnographic work and will result in both an edited book and a film about ethnography based on the workshop and interviews with participants.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

Information about applying to organize the 2020 ACIP workshop and for the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards will be available in November 2018. The deadline for both workshop applications and student applications is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund.

2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award
May 1 all-day

 

The African Critical Inquiry Programme has named Mary Mbewe as recipient of the 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award. Mbewe is a Zambian student pursuing her PhD in the Department of History at the University of the Western Cape. Support from ACIP’s Ivan Karp Award will allow her to do research in London, Lusaka, and Mbala, Zambia for her dissertation project, From Chisungu to the Museum: a Historical Ethnography of the Images, Objects, and Anthropological Texts of the Chisungu Female Initiation Ceremony in the Moto Moto Museum in Zambia, 1931 to 2016.

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions, and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP Workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

 

About Mary Mbewe’s project

Mbewe’s project examines and reconstructs the histories of the photographs and objects of the chisungu female initiation ceremony of northern Zambia that were collected between 1931 and 1934 by the British anthropologist Audrey Richards and by the French Canadian missionary ethnographer Jean Jacques Corbeil in the 1950s. It tracks these items through the key moments of collection, circulation, archiving, accession, display and consumption, simultaneously seeing these photographs and things as objects, as records, and as containers of histories. This project is therefore a history of a hitherto unexplored instance of interrelated ethnographic research and a study of ethnography and histories of collection on a particular subject. It involves a renewed look at the work of an anthropologist and a missionary at different periods, each culminating in renowned publications, and whose photographs and objects have become iconic representations of the chisungu ceremony at the Moto Moto Museum in Zambia. This research project is conceived not only as a biographic study of these collections and histories, but also as a study of processes of meaning-making in a museum, which had its origins in particular colonial contexts and was formalised as a national museum in the post-colonial period. The research engages with how the photographs and objects have come to be constituted by the histories, museum and archival processes around them. It will contribute to debates around representing African culture, anthropological photographs, ethnographic objects, and museums in Africa, and more generally to museum studies, visual history, material culture studies, and the history of anthropology.

 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Information about the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards for African students enrolled in South African Ph.D. programmes will be available in November 2018. The application deadline is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund