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Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Jan
26
Fri
Call for Applications: Encoding and Transmitting Knowledge with a String Fellowship
Jan 26 all-day

ANR project ETKnoS (2016–2020)

Call for Applications for a post-doctoral position in Social/Cultural Anthropology

ETKnoS-Encoding and Transmitting Knowledge with a String
A comparative study of the cultural uses of mathematical practices in string-figure making (Oceania, North & South America).

ETKnoS is a four-year research project funded by the French National Research Agency (ANR 16-CE27-0005-01). It is devoted to the study of “string-figure making” practices—which consist in producing a figure or design with a loop of string, by carrying out a succession of operations on this loop, using mostly fingers. Known of in numerous societies where an oral tradition prevails, this practice brings into play gestural sequences akin to algorithms, while enunciating terms and even specific stories or chants. The overall objective of ETKnoS is to understand the mathematical dimension of such practices, by considering their place in specific cultural and linguistic contexts (cf. http://www.sphere.univ-paris-diderot.fr/spip.php?rubrique170&lang=en).

Based on anthropological and ethnolinguistic analyses of data (to be) collected in several Oceanian societies (in Papua-New-Guinea and in Vanuatu), in South and North America (including the Arctic), ETKnoS examines the relationships between operational sequences and the words that are spoken or sung during these sequences. One particular goal here is to gain an improved understanding of the extent to which, in these societies, the practice of string-figure making constitutes/constituted a method for the organization and transmission of knowledge (be it mythological, cosmological, sociological geographical, etc.), involving the use of mathematical concepts.

ETKnoS’ interdisciplinary team is coordinated by ethnomathematician Eric Vandendriessche (CNRS), and currently includes two anthropologists (specialized in Inuit and Papua-New-Guinean societies), and two linguists (specialized in Inuit and Melanesian languages).

ETKnoS is soliciting applications for a full-time postdoctoral position in Anthropology which will be hosted at Paris Diderot University in the “Science, Philosophy, History” laboratory (SPHERE, UMR 7219, CNRS & Université Paris Diderot).

Planned duration of the position: 2 years, consisting in a one-year contract, renewable for a further 12 months pending a positive evaluation.

The appointment is expected to start March 1, 2018, or as soon as possible thereafter.
Net monthly salary from 2000 to 2500 euros, commensurate with experience.

To qualify for the position, candidates are required to have completed their PhD in Social/Cultural (or Linguistic) Anthropology, with a specialization in a South Amerindian society, preferably in the Amazon or in the Chaco. However, any application pertaining to oral tradition societies from South America will be carefully considered. The candidates should have significant experience in conducting ethnographic fieldwork. Experience in ethnolinguistic research and/or competence in an Indigenous language will be an asset.

The selected candidate will start out by reviewing and analyzing the existing sources (ethnographic, ethnological/ethnolinguistic and anthropological data) on string-figure making as practiced in a specific cultural area, determined by the candidate’s expertise. Subsequently the candidate will carry out ‘participant-observer’ ethnographic research over a significant period of time, in order to gather original data on string figure-making (i.e. the procedures leading to the figures, as well as any material concerning relationships with the cosmology, mythology, knowledge system and/or other practices of the designated group).

Applications should be sent no later than January 26, 2017 to Eric Vandendriessche.
They should include: an application letter, a short CV (2–3 pages, with a list of publications), a written sample of academic work (e.g., thesis and/or a recent paper), and contact information for two possible references (name, institution, email contact).

The result will be published on February 3, 2018.

For further information, please contact Eric Vandendriessche ([email protected]).

Feb
1
Thu
Colorado State University PhD Program
Feb 1 all-day

The Department of Anthropology at Colorado State University is delighted to announce the Fall 2018 launch of a new PhD program in anthropology focused on Place, Space, and Adaptation. This innovative PhD in anthropology builds on the diverse research interests of our faculty who specialize in cultural anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology as well as human and physical geography. The program will provide students with the conceptual expertise and skills to address research questions that:

  • sit at the intersection of anthropology and geography
  • apply geographic methods to anthropological questions
  • critically evaluate the impact of place and space on human/ecosystem adaptation

PhD Field Areas: Biological Anthropology, Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology
PhD Specializations: The traditional subfields of Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, and Cultural Anthropology, in addition to Geography
PhD Requirements: MA in Anthropology, Geography, or related field. 42 hours of coursework, qualifying exam, dissertation based on field or lab work, and oral defense

Visit the program website for more information.

Feb
18
Sun
SQCC’s Arabic Children’s Program
Feb 18 all-day

Our Arabic program for children is committed to the task of building an appreciation of the language and understanding of its culture among the youth. We aim to prepare young students to become confident speakers at an early age. We teach Modern Standard Arabic at all levels and across different age groups. Lessons are conducted in MSA in an immersion style environment and focuses on all four language learning skills:  listening, speaking, reading and writing.

No prior knowledge of Arabic is required for students to participate in our program. However, students with some Arabic proficiency will be given an assessment test to determine their level before attending class. Students will be grouped in different classes based on language ability and age. Heritage Speakers and Non-native Speakers of Arabic follow the same course of study in our program.

Our program is a scholarship-based program available to qualified children who reside in Washington, D.C., Virginia, and Maryland.

 

Open House: January 27, 2018, 11:00 am to 2:00 pm
Application Deadline: February 18, 2018
Assessment Test: February 19  to February 22, 2018, 3:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Session I: March 3 to May 19
Day: Saturdays
Time: 10:00 am to 11:30 am

Levels and Age Groups

Our courses are divided into two levels for each age group category: Level 1 for beginners and level 2 for intermediate.

Level 1 (Ages 6-11 years)

In this course, students will learn the Arabic alphabet and long and short vowels. This course is designed to enable students to read three and four-letter words. They will also be able to develop basic writing skills by joining letters. Students will be able to express themselves in simple sentences, learn numbers, and learn basic conversation skills. The course curriculum incorporates the use of educational games, stories and songs.

Level 2 (Ages 6-11 years)

In this course, students will be introduced to basic Arabic grammar – singular pronouns and possessive pronouns. Students will engage in conversation about personal data, school life, family members etc. In addition to the required textbook, this course will utilize educational posters and handouts which will help students to verbally express themselves with simple sentences. Students will have spelling tests to assert their proficiency of letters and vowel sound recognition. The course places a greater emphasis on reading and listening comprehension.

Level 1 (Ages 12-15 years)

In this course, students will learn the Arabic alphabets and long and short vowels. Students will master recognition of Arabic script and dictation. While students are learning basic grammatical patterns, they will learn Arabic greetings, know how to introduce themselves, tell time, days of the week, and numbers. In addition, they will engage in educational games, stories and songs for their appropriate age.

Level 2 (Ages 12-15 years)

In this course, students will be able to read sentences and small paragraphs. They will master essential grammar structure to form correct sentences. The will learn verb and noun conjugation, adjectives, and adverbs. Students will be introduced to the ten measure chart. They will be able to write short paragraphs. This course is designed to hone students’ verbal communication skills through role plays and guided conversations to advance their proficiency and fluency in Arabic.

Application is open now for Session I (March 3 to May 19)

Application Deadline is February 18.

Application Form 

Apr
3
Tue
Call for Applications: Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards
Apr 3 @ 11:59 pm

CLIR Invites Applications for 2018
Digitizing Hidden Special Collections Awards

Washington, DC, January 17, 2018 – The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is now accepting applications for 2018 Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives awards. The national competition, funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, supports digitizing collections of rare and unique content in collecting institutions.

Grants of between $50,000 and $250,000 for a single-institution project, or between $50,000 and $500,000 for a collaborative project, may be sought for projects beginning between January 1 and June 1, 2019.

The Digitizing Hidden Collections program coheres around six core values:

Scholarship: The program is designed to maximize its impact on the creation and dissemination of new knowledge.

Comprehensiveness: The program supports digitization projects that will provide thorough coverage of an important topic or topics of high interest to scholars, in ways that help those scholars understand digitized sources’ provenance and context.

Connectedness: The program supports projects that make digitized sources easily discoverable and accessible alongside related materials, including materials held by other collecting institutions as well as those held within the home institution.

Collaboration: The program promotes strategic partnerships rather than duplication of capacity and effort.

Sustainability: The program promotes best practices for ensuring the long-term availability and discoverability of digital files created through digitization.

Openness: The program ensures that digitized content will be made available to the public as easily and completely as possible, given ethical and legal constraints.

The application process has two phases. The initial proposal round is open, and proposals are due by 11:59 pm Eastern time on April 3, 2018. The final proposal round is by invitation. Only those applicants whose initial proposals have been approved by the program’s review panel will be able to submit a final proposal. Information for applicants, including a link to the online application form, is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

CLIR will hold a webinar for prospective applicants on Tuesday, January 30, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. Two Q&A webinars will be held on Thursday, February 15, and Wednesday, February 28, from 2:00-3:00 pm Eastern time. More information is available at https://www.clir.org/hiddencollections/applicant-resources/.

The Council on Library and Information Resources is an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching, and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions, and communities of higher learning.

Council on Library and Information Resources
1707 L Street, Ste 650
Washington, DC 20036, USA

Phone: 202.939.4750
www.clir.org

Apr
30
Mon
Achill Archaeological Field School Scholarship 2018 @ Achill Archaeological Field School
Apr 30 all-day

For the first time in 2018 Achill Archaeological Field School will offer two $2000 scholarships for any of our 6-week or 12-week accredited excavation courses (Excavations and Recording 1, 2, or 7). The bursaries, which can be offset against course fees, aim to support students in their field school journey of discovery.

Application

  • Applicants for the scholarship should submit a 500 word statement outlining why they wish to study at the Achill Archaeological Field School accompanied by a CV.
  • Students must have applied and completed enrolment at the Achill Archaeological Field School before the scholarship deadline of April 30, 2018.
  • Applications should be sent to [email protected] with subject title ‘Scholarship’.

Place of Study

The study will be taken at Achill Archaeological Field School, Dooagh, Achill Island, Co. Mayo, Ireland.

Applicants’ Nationality

There is no nationality restriction.

Submission Deadline

30 April 2018.

Contact Details

If you have any further questions please contact us at [email protected].

May
1
Tue
Call for Applications: 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards
May 1 all-day

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS: IVAN KARP DOCTORAL RESEARCH AWARDS FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SOUTH AFRICAN PhD PROGRAMMES

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

 

The African Critical Inquiry Programme is pleased to announce the 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards to support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled at South African universities and conducting dissertation research on relevant topics. Grant amounts vary depending on research plans, with a maximum award of ZAR 40,000.

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ELIGIBILITY: The Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards are open to African postgraduate students (regardless of citizenship) in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Applicants must be currently registered in a PhD programme in a

South African university and be working on topics related to ACIP’s focus. Awards will support doctoral research projects focused on topics such as institutions of public culture, particular aspects of museums and exhibitions, forms and practices of public scholarship, culture and communication, and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship.

Applicants must submit a dissertation proposal that has been approved by their institution to confirm the award; this must be completed before they begin ACIP- supported on-site research or by December 2018, whichever comes first.

APPLICATION PROCESS: Awards are open to proposals working with a range of methodologies in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, including research in archives and collections, fieldwork, interviews, surveys, and quantitative data collection. Applicants are expected to write in clear, intelligible prose for a selection committee that is multi-disciplinary and cross-regional. Proposals should show thorough knowledge of the major concepts, theories, and methods in the applicant’s discipline and in other related fields and include a bibliography relevant to the research. Applicants should specify why an extended period of on-site research is essential to successfully complete the proposed doctoral dissertation. Guidance and advice on how to write a good proposal and budget can be found in the Resources section of the ACIP website (http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html) or here: http://www.ssrc.org/publications/view/the-art-of-writing-proposals/.

To apply, eligible applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (form below and online at  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  • abstract of the proposed research project (250 words maximum)
  •  research proposal outlining the project’s goals, central questions, significance, and relevance for ACIP’s central concerns. Proposals should include a clearly formulated, realistic research design and plan of work responsive to the project’s theoretical and methodological concerns. Applicants should provide evidence of appropriate training to undertake the proposed research, including the language fluency necessary for the project. Proposals should be no longer than 5 pages; they should be double spaced, with one inch margins and a font no smaller than 11 point. Applications that do not follow this format will not be considered.
  • bibliography of up to two additional pages
  • project budget listing and justifying project expenses to be supported by the award
  • your curriculum vitae
  • current transcript
  • two referee letters; one of these must be from your supervisor. Your referees should comment specifically on your proposed project, its quality and significance, and your qualifications for undertaking it. They might also evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of your project and how you and your work would benefit from receiving the research award. Referee letters should be submitted directly to the selection committee.

 

Funding is to be used for on-site dissertation research; research cannot be at the applicant’s home institution unless that institution has necessary site-specific research holdings not otherwise available to the applicant. Applicants who have completed significant funded dissertation research by the start of their proposed ACIP research may be ineligible to apply to extend research time. Eligibility will be at the discretion of the ACIP Selection Committee, depending on completed research time and funding. Please note that the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards support dissertation research only and may not be used for dissertation write-up, tuition, study at other universities, conference participation, or to reimburse debts or expenses for research already completed. The programme does not accept applications from PhD programmes in Law, Business, Medicine, Nursing, or Journalism, nor does it accept applications in doctoral programmes that do not lead to a PhD.

SELECTION PROCESS: Applications will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee, an interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners drawn from a range of universities and cultural institutions. Selection will be based on the merit and strength of the application. Award amounts will vary according to project needs; the maximum award is ZAR 40,000. Awards will be made only if applications of high quality are received.

Notification of awards will be made by late July.

Successful applicants will be required to attend the African Critical Inquiry Workshop in the following year and will have opportunities to consult with scholars associated with the Workshop. They will be expected to attend subsequent ACIP Workshops while completing their dissertations, if possible. After completing their research, applicants must submit a final research report and a financial report.

Students who receive an Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Award from the African Critical Inquiry Programme must acknowledge the support in any publications resulting from the research and in their dissertation. When the dissertation is completed, they must deposit a copy with the African Critical Inquiry Programme at the Center for Humanities Research.

 

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received on or before Tuesday 1 May 2018. Incomplete applications and applications that do not conform to format guidelines will not be considered.

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2018 Research Award Application” to  [email protected]

 

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund  
http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html
 https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund

Call for Applications: African Critical Inquiry Programme Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards
May 1 all-day

FOR AFRICAN STUDENTS ENROLLED IN SOUTH AFRICAN PhD PROGRAMS

Closing Date: Tuesday 1 May 2018

The African Critical Inquiry Programme is pleased to announce the 2018 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards to support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences who are enrolled at South African universities and conducting dissertation research on relevant topics. Grant amounts vary depending on research plans, with a maximum award of ZAR 40,000.

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards are open to African postgraduate students (regardless of citizenship) in the humanities and humanistic social sciences. Applicants must be currently registered in a PhD programme in a South African university and be working on topics related to ACIP’s focus. Awards will support doctoral research projects focused on topics such as institutions of public culture, particular aspects of museums and exhibitions, forms and practices of public scholarship, culture and communication, and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Awards are open to proposals working with a range of methodologies in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, including research in archives and collections, fieldwork, interviews, surveys, and quantitative data collection.

For full information about this opportunity and how to apply, see the full Call for Proposals listed under “ACIP Opportunities” on our website: http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html.