Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Mar
1
Fri
The International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019: Perspectives Conference
Mar 1 all-day

1st Call for Proposals
The International Year of Indigenous Languages 2019: Perspectives Conference
Purdue University Fort Wayne, Indiana
October 31 – November 2, 2019
https://iyil2019perspectives.org/

 

About the conference
The conference will celebrate the United Nations’ International Year of Indigenous Languages from a variety of perspectives including policy, education, linguistic, community, and others. Experts from around the globe have been invited to participate in panels, present keynote talks, and share their work and experiences in promoting Indigenous languages. Conference themes will include, but are not limited to the following:

• Community achievements and Indigenous languages
• Community collaborations and partnerships
• Educational policy for language revitalization and maintenance
• Indigenous languages in the contemporary world
• Indigenous voices in popular culture (e.g. social media, fiction, poetry, film, hip hop)
• Indigenous languages and multilingualism
• Diaspora and Indigenous language learning

While proposals that address these themes are especially encouraged, proposals on other subjects related to Indigenous languages are also welcomed.

In the spirit of this celebration, participants will share their experiences and knowledge and thus bring community voices, policy voices, and academic voices together.

Presentation format: Paper, poster, performance, and technology or other type of showcase

Presentation time slots: Papers and performances will be allowed 30 minutes (20 minutes for presentation + 10 minutes for questions and answers). Poster presentations will run during a determined time slot, but posters will be displayed throughout the day of the poster presentation. Technology or other type of showcases may choose between a presentation time slot or an exhibit booth.

Proposal deadline: March 1, 2019

Notification of acceptance: April 1, 2019

Proposal submission information

  • Language: Proposals should be submitted in English, but presentations can be in any language (we ask that presenters ensure that translation in English is made possible in order to be accessible to all participants, while we cannot provide translators we will work with presenters as needed to this end). Because we anticipate a number of non-experts to participate in the conference, we ask that your proposals and, if accepted, your presentations and posters be devoid of technical jargon and directed towards a non-expert audience.
  • Number of proposals: Authors may submit no more than one individual and one co authored proposal, or no more than two co-authored proposals
  • Content: Proposals should describe the content of the presentation, including the intended audience and how it relates to the conference themes
  • Length: Please limit your proposal to 500 words, not including references
  • Anonymity: To facilitate blind peer review, please do not include your name or affiliation in your proposal or filename. Your proposal should only include your presentation title, proposal content, and list of references (if applicable)
  • Format: Please submit your abstract as a PDF file or as a Word document
  • Due date: Proposals are due by March 1, 2019
  • Submission system: We will use the EasyChair Proposal submission system. To be able to use this system, you will first need to sign up for a free EasyChair Author account, if you don’t already have one. From there you can submit your abstract as an Author and make any updates or modifications to your proposal submission up to the submission deadline. Submit your proposal here to EasyChair. If you should have questions about the system, please contact Carmen Jany at [email protected]
  • Other submission possibilities: Hard copy submissions will be accepted from those who do not have Internet access. Please send one hard copy of your proposal, along with the following information: (1) your name, (2) affiliation, (3) mailing address, (4) phone number, (5) email address, and (6) title of your paper. Hard copies must be post-marked on or before March 15, 2019 and may be sent to:

    IYIL Conference/Carmen Jany
    5500 University Parkway
    San Bernardino, CA, United States 92407

Mar
17
Sun
Call for Information about Dissertations in German Studies
Mar 17 all-day

The German Studies Association (https://www.thegsa.org/) is continuing its tradition of posting information in the spring newsletter about dissertations completed in any area of German (that means: Austrian, German, Swiss, German diasporic) Studies (any discipline or interdisciplinary). If you received your Ph.D. in 2017 or 2018, you may be listed in the GSA’s spring 2019 newsletter (no repeats, however!). If you have supervised a dissertation that was completed in 2017 or 2018 that has not already been listed, please encourage the author to submit a description following the guidelines below.

Send an email to Janet Ward ([email protected]) anytime before March 17, 2019.

Please type “GSA dissertation list” in the subject line.

Be sure to include (in this order, please):

1. Name (Last, first)
2. Title of dissertation
3. Institution and department in which it was defended
4. Name of dissertation director(s)
5. Month and Year of Defense (or degree if no defense)
6. Abstract of the dissertation of 200 or fewer words in either English or German. (150 words is desired length, 200 words an absolute limit. Longer abstracts will be shortened)

Mar
31
Sun
CFP: 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society
Mar 31 all-day

The 2019 Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society  

October 16-19, 2019 • Hyatt Regency Baltimore Inner Harbor • Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Proposal submission deadline: March 31, 2019

Community-Driven

You can’t stop the people of Baltimore, Maryland, from expressing the enduring traditions that define this City of Neighborhoods, where community-based efforts drive culture, spark change, and sustain place-making. Come to Baltimore and experience what it means to be community driven in a city that illuminates the diverse geographies and peoples of Maryland and the surrounding region—urban, rural, Appalachian, and estuarine.

This meeting will explore what it means for the folklore world to be of, by and for the people—community driven. We invite participants to reveal how communities use the tools of folklore to build partnerships, foster innovation and sustainability, respond to injustice, and create conditions for reconciliation in a time of division and distraction; to explore community-driven curation and preservation in a digitally connected world; and to participate in discussions on building capacity to help folklorists better serve the communities with whom they work. Equally, we invite reflections on folklore as an instrument for constructing and shaping communities themselves, recognizing that this is not always a benevolent process for either insiders or outsiders.

In focusing on what is community driven, we also draw attention to:

  • Partnerships
  • Local responses and resistance
  • Work fostering new connections
  • Grassroots curations of action and sustainability
  • The role of cultural workers in sustaining communities and expressive life
  • The value of (and definitions of) community in times of division
  • Folk and vernacular culture in a digitally connected world
  • Community resilience and solidarity on the front lines of climate change

The Annual Meeting of the American Folklore Society will bring hundreds of US and international specialists in folklore and folklife, folk narrative, popular culture, music, material culture, and related fields, to exchange work and ideas and to create and strengthen relationships and networks. Prospective participants may submit proposals for papers, panels, forums, films, and diamond presentations, or propose new presentation formats. Presentations on the theme are encouraged but not required. We especially welcome proposals for creative presentations in any format that are populated robustly by community members telling their own stories in their own words. Contact [email protected] to discuss alternative presentation formats.

You can find more information about the meeting, including the full theme statement, instructions for submitting proposals and more about meeting events at http://www.afsnet.org/page/2019AM.

Proposals may be submitted February 15–March 31, 2019.

 

Apr
12
Fri
Call for Participation: EPIC 2019
Apr 12 all-day

EPIC2019
Providence, Rhode Island, 9–12 November 2019
2019.epicpeople.org

The EPIC2019 theme is Agency: What does it mean to have agency in an increasingly automated world? Businesses are investing in “intelligent” technologies that promise to take humans “out of the loop.” But human agency is not disappearing—it’s evolving, and humanistic perspectives are more essential than ever. EPIC2019 will explore how our models of behavior and culture shape spaces of opportunity and risk for diverse people and organizations. We invite ethnographers and technologists of all backgrounds to advance the value of our work through the prism of agency. Read the full conference theme.

The Program Committee invites proposals for Papers, Case Studies, PechaKucha, Film, Gallery, and the Graduate Colloquium. Most contributions should draw on theoretical advances in ethnographically informed social science research and aligned disciplines, coupled with applied best practices from professional fields. We welcome contributions from any discipline, industry, or organization in the private, public, or nonprofit sectors that creates and applies ethnography.

General registration for EPIC2019 opens April 30 and anyone can attend; it is not necessary to submit a proposal (see registration FAQ).

 

KEY DATES

  • Submission deadline – April 12, the last midnight on earth!
  • Acceptance notification – June 28
  • First draft submission –  August 5
Apr
15
Mon
Call for Films: 2019 Jean Rouch International Film Festival
Apr 15 all-day

The 2019 Jean Rouch International Film Festival is now open for entries.

Eligibility requirements are:

The deadline to submit a film is 15th April 2019.
• Entries must be completed after 1st January 2018.
• Films may be submitted via online screener only (secure vimeo link available until November 25, 2019)
• Only French or English subtitled versions are accepted.
• You will find the online entry form on our website, via http://www.comitedufilmethnographique.com/inscription-2019-entry-form-2019-2/
• The list of the selected films will be available on our website homepage in early July 2019.

Below is a short description of the festival. The Competition programme will be held from 16-23 November 2019.

The Festival Jean Rouch, previously known as Bilan du FIlm Ethnographique, was created in March 1982 by anthropologist and filmmaker Jean Rouch. Over the past thirty eight years, the Festival’s aim has been to showcase the most innovative and relevant trends in ethnographic filmmaking, visual anthropology, and to promote dialogue between cultures.

The Festival selects films that document and explore human societies and cultures in their many facets, such as social and cultural diversity, continuity and change, cultural transmission, relationship to the environment…
We welcome submissions of documentary films made by anthropologists, students, and professional filmmakers. We welcome all forms and styles of filmmaking, without restriction to theme and length.

Organized by the Comité du Film Ethnographique, this international film festival is held in Paris (France). Each year, it brings together filmmakers, academics, students and producers, in an attempt to promote discussions and debates amongst ethnographic film practitioners and their many publics, and to favour the diffusion and the distribution of the films.

May
1
Wed
2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies
May 1 all-day

2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is pleased to announce that the 2019 ACIP workshop will be African Ethnographies. The project was proposed and will be organized by colleagues at the University of the Western Cape, Jung Ran Annachiara Forte (Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology) and Sakhumzi Mfecane (Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology and Sociology). Activities will take place in Cape Town, South Africa.

African Ethnographies
While the practice of ethnography has a long history in Africa, insufficient debate has emerged around it recently on the African continent. Far from being specific only to anthropology, ethnography has become a widespread mode of knowing inside and outside academic spaces. We would like to prompt reflection around this concept and practice, which is slippery, changing, dense, polysemic, and composed of a plurality of voices. The African Ethnographies workshop will raise questions about ethnography across disciplines, its contemporary forms – not exclusively written, and its publics. Ethnography enables conceptual work that transcends simple divides between the empirical, the methodological, and the theoretical. The workshop is particularly interested in understanding how ethnography and its conceptual work can allow us to grasp the complexities of contemporary African worlds, their precariousness, and their becomings. We are interested in exploring: (1) the work of theorization that ethnography makes possible; (2) understandings of public ethnography today; and finally (3) ways to re-rethink ethnography from the African continent. The workshop seeks to open a space of dialogue by bringing together emerging scholars across different disciplines and from institutions across Africa. By engaging in discussions around theory, methods, public engagements, and ethnographic sensibilities and modes of expression, we hope to better understand the challenges of doing ethnography in Africa’s contemporary worlds. The workshop will include a performance/ lecture that explores the performative potential of ethnographic work and will result in both an edited book and a film about ethnography based on the workshop and interviews with participants.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

Information about applying to organize the 2020 ACIP workshop and for the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards will be available in November 2018. The deadline for both workshop applications and student applications is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund.

Call for Proposals to Organize a 2020 Workshop
May 1 all-day

AFRICAN CRITICAL INQUIRY PROGRAMME

“Who defines the needs of the people and the related epistemologies that serve them?” (Karp & Masolo 2000:10)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO ORGANISE A WORKSHOP

Closing Date: Wednesday 1 May 2019

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organise a workshop to take place in 2020. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions, and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular questions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational forms, or institutional forms from diverse methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that bring into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

 

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energise conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organisations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organisations, NGOs, or others appropriate to the topic. Abstracts for previously funded ACIP Workshops are available here.

 

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2020.
  • a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  •  a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  • a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organisers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape for basic financial administration and are responsible for complying with CHR policies. Workshop organisers should submit a letter from the host institution, centre, programme, or department confirming that appropriate administrative and institutional support will be available.

We ask Workshop organisers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organisers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organisations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches, or specialisations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply: Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  •  abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement defining the proposed Workshop theme and focus, its significance, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organising the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organiser)
  • institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop. Please describe available administrative and logistical support in this letter and/or your work plan
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organisation, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

 

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

 

Conceptualisation: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions, and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross- institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed Workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

 

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

 

Workshop organiser(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organising the Workshop, including previous administration/organisation and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds, and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

 

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

 

Applicants who organise an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research.

After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Wednesday 1 May 2019. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2020 Workshop Proposal” to [email protected]

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html  https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund