Calendar

Search here for conference announcements, calls for papers, fellowships and more.

Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Dec
28
Fri
Call for Proposals: Understanding the Rules of life: Building a Synthetic Cell
Dec 28 all-day

Understanding the Rules of life: Building a Synthetic Cell (NSF 18-599) invites researchers to apply to participate in an interdisciplinary Ideas Lab focused on facilitating innovative research projects for designing, fabricating, and validating synthetic cells that express specified phenotypes. Up to $10,000,000 of funding is available for successful project proposals resulting from the Ideas Lab.

Building a synthetic cell is a grand challenge at the interface between biological, mathematical, computer and physical sciences and engineering.  Meeting this challenge requires simultaneous careful exploration of the social and ethical dimensions of such research as well as educating today’s students to engage in the activities and technologies required to develop and use synthetic cells.

To apply to this program, researchers should:

  • submit preliminary proposals due December 28, 2018,
  • participate, if selected, in the Ideas Lab workshop to be held February 25 – March 1, 2019, and
  • if invited to do so, submit, as part of a team, a full proposal due May 13, 2019.

Full details regarding the specifics of the research ideas, proposal limitations, and the application process can be found in the full solicitation.

Jan
4
Fri
CHRÓNOS: an International Multi-Disciplinary Percussion Symposium
Jan 4 all-day

CHRÓNOS is an International Multi-Disciplinary Percussion Symposium bringing together scholars, performers, pedagogues, and health and wellness professionals in an inclusive environment aimed at delving à l’intérieur of percussion studies and percussive processes.

 

Organization: University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
Location: School of Music, Brownsville, TX
Dates: April 4 & 5, 2019
Abstract Deadline: January 4, 2019

 

Call for Presentations

UTRGV School of Music invites abstracts for its international, multi-disciplinary percussion symposium with keynote address by Dr. John Parks IV. We invite proposals for paper presentations, interactive sessions, or posters/exhibits addressing the following theme and perspectives:

 

The Art of Noise

In antiquity, life was nothing but silence. Noise was really not born before the 19th century. With the advent of machinery, noise reigns supreme over human sensibility. —Luigi Russolo (1913)

Reflective: “Primitive people attributed to sound a divine origin. It became surrounded with religious respect, and reserved for the priests, who thereby enriched their rites with a new mystery.”

Current: “To excite our sensibility, music has developed into a search for a more complex polyphony and a greater variety of instrumental tones and coloring. It has tried to obtain the most complex succession of dissonant chords, thus preparing the ground for musical noise.

Forward: “We must break at all cost from this restrictive circle of pure sounds and conquer the infinite variety of noise-sounds.”

 

Submission Guidelines

Please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to [email protected] by January 4. The abstract should include title of the paper, name of the author, institutional affiliation, short bio, and any A/V requirements. Invitations to present will be sent via email by January 21, 2019.

 

Webpage: https://webapps.utrgv.edu/it/em/index.cfm?event=Public.View.Courses&Event_id=1262

Jan
31
Thu
Call for Contributors: What Anthropologists Do, Veronica Strang (2nd edition)
Jan 31 all-day

Dear Fellow Anthropologists,

We are in the process of updating an introductory ‘primer’ in Applied Anthropology, entitled What Anthropologists Do, which was initially published in 2009.

The intention was originally to introduce the subject to school leavers or first year undergraduates, who often have little idea about what anthropology is, or what anthropologists do. The purpose of this second edition remains primarily to encourage people to study anthropology and also to illustrate the wide variety of careers now available to anthropologists. The book has also become widely used in undergraduate anthropology courses, to help people think about the areas they want to focus on as they progress.

The text has a secondary purpose: many potential employers of anthropologists – industries, agencies and government organisations – also have little familiarity with anthropology as a discipline, and thus only rarely make use of anthropologists and their particular skills. By providing them with a highly accessible and updated introduction to the subject, the volume will – it is hoped – encourage greater use of anthropology and the potential insights provided by ethnographic research.

What we are looking for this time are exciting new examples of research and short autobiographical accounts describing people’s experiences in applying anthropology, especially in emergent areas.

If you would like to be involved in helping to get our discipline ‘out there’, please have a look at these new areas (below). Depending on your level of enthusiasm and ability to spend some time on this, you could send some brief examples of your current research and how you have applied anthropology. How did you get involved, and what difference has the inclusion of anthropology made in your work? (If I quote you or make broader use of your comments, this will be acknowledged.) 

And/or you could offer a short autobiographical account (1000-2000 words) of your work as an applied anthropologist, possibly including some feedback about it from the people with whom you have worked. If you think you might like to do this, please write a brief outline (about 200 words), and attach a CV as well as your contact details.

We do hope that you will support this continuing effort to encourage wider engagement with our discipline. So if you are doing some good things with anthropology, please let us know, sending responses to either [email protected] or [email protected].

Initial drafts/suggestions should be submitted by the end of September, so that we can spend October reviewing possible items to include. The deadline for the inclusion of final drafts for approved content is January 31st, 2019.

Many thanks,

Veronica Strang and Joanna Puckering

 

Summary of new areas, update for 2nd edition.

Introduction

A more substantial body of literature to mention, including basic introductions to anthropology and to professional practice.

Chapter 1. Anthropology and Advocacy

Debates on GM and related issues – new issues such as:

Neonicotinoids

Fracking

Biofuels etc.

Indigenous rights and mining issues, eg. Standing Rock

Debates about ecological justice/rights for nature

Efforts to declare rivers as ‘living ancestors’ and ‘legal persons’

Advocacy more directly in relation to non-human rights and conservation

Human rights:

More focus on displacement

Treatment of refugees

Human trafficking

Modern slavery

Rights to clean water

Rights to sanitation

Freshwater resources

Water security

Chapter 2. Anthropology and Aid

General updating with ongoing research on (and critiques of) international aid development

Medical humanitarianism

More on involvement of anthropologists in participatory action research

Material about gypsies could be updated

Chapter 3. Anthropology and Development

Ecotourism

Emergent conflicts around tourism taking over cities (eg. Barcelona, Lisbon)

Displacement of local residents in favour of profitable Air B&B accommodation etc.

Dams continue to be controversial

Diversion of limited freshwater resources into irrigation

Chapter 4. Anthropology and the Environment

Impacts of the patterns of freshwater use (and see Ch3)

Plastics in the ocean

Tipping points in extinctions

Air quality issues

Energy production/consumption

Fisheries policy (and Brexit)

Conservation controversies over big cat protection

Updates to climate change debates / anthropological perspectives

Archaeology and historical archaeology

Heritage:

 – Recent controversies over Stonehenge tunnel would update that material

 – Lighthouses and heritage

 – Land and identity

 – Strengthen the material on urban identities

Chapter 5. Anthropology and Governance

Recent rise in populism, Brexit etc.

Rising influence of social media

Anthropology’s involvement in public policy development

Changes in managerial cultures

Corporatisation of health and education institutions (schools and universities)

Continued rise of transnational corporations; their ownership of key resources and utilities

Involvement of anthropology in military and covert government activities

Chapter 6. Anthropology, Business and Industry

Business and digital developments:

 – Advertising etc. via Facebook (and related controversies)

 – Virtual realities/cyberspace

 – Online gaming

 – Employment of anthropologists by Google, Microsoft etc

Anthropologists working with unions/on industrial action

New methods such as UX (user experience) testing

Professional behaviour

Gender relations

Gender pay gap

Chapter 7.  Anthropology and Health

Sex/reproduction/technologies

Changes in the last decade, eg. issues:

 – Surrogacy

 – Sperm donation

 – Abortion

 – Child rearing

Emergent issues about millennials and health

Changes in approaches to mental health

Huge issues (especially in the UK) about the demographics of aging, dementia etc.

Related concerns around health provision:

 – NHS

 – Health insurance in the US etc.

Major new outbreaks of disease, eg. Ebola (importance of anthropological understandings)

Forensic anthropology – continues to expand, especially in relation to disaster zones

Chapter 8. Anthropology, Art and Identity

 Standalone ‘identity’ related topics

 Those expressed via art and material culture

The former:

New work dealing with gender and sexuality, eg.

 – Same sex marriage

 – Transgender issues

 – Adoption etc.

Discussions about race:

 – Re-emergence of the extreme right wing and its effects

Breakdown of federal states, eg. Scotland and Catalonia, efforts to achieve independence and outcomes to date

Visual anthropology and representation:

 – Museums

 – Cultural heritage

 – Archaeology and historical archaeology

Development and (both tangible and intangible) cultural heritage

Visual anthropology and social intervention

Chapter 9. Interdisciplinary Anthropology (New chapter)

Situations in which interdisciplinary research involves (and is assisted by the involvement of) anthropology

Issues around how anthropology is applied

The need to provide students with practical training in engaging with other disciplines

The perspectives of non-academic professionals, industry specialists etc.

Engaging with alternate forms of expertise involves:

 – seeking shared research questions

 – common theoretical framework

 – navigating sometimes difficult issues, eg. disciplinary identity, territoriality, power, access to funding, disciplinary status

Conclusion

Additional section providing a vision of where anthropology is heading in the future.

 

Feb
1
Fri
Call for Proposals: Understanding the Rules of Life: Epigenetics
Feb 1 all-day

Understanding the Rules of Life: Epigenetics (NSF 18-600) invites proposals which investigate heritable biological or chemical mechanisms that produce a phenotypic effect without alteration of the DNA sequence.  Projects must integrate education perspectives and research approaches from more than one research discipline (e.g., biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics, social and behavioral sciences) to understand epigenetic mechanisms associated with environmental change, the resultant phenotypic characteristics of organisms, and the resultant robustness and adaptability of organisms and populations. Studies that cross multiple levels of organizational complexity (molecular, cellular, physiological, organismal, population) and temporal (including evolutionary) scales, and taxa within the tree of life – both unicellular and multicellular organisms, including humans — are particularly encouraged.

Full proposals are due February 1, 2019, and can be submitted in one of two submission tracks:

(1) award duration of up to 3 years and a total budget of $500,000 or

(2) award duration of up to 5 years and a total budget of $3,000,000.

The specifics of the program priorities and areas of emphasis, as well as additional limitations and guidelines, can be found in the full solicitation.

Feb
15
Fri
25th Canadian Ethnic Studies Association Conference @ Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel
Feb 15 – Feb 17 all-day

 Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, and Diasporic Communities in a Transnational World

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Association (CESA) invites panel and/or paper proposals for its upcoming conference on the theme of “Immigration, Ethnic Mobilities, Diasporic Communities and Transnationalism in a Transnational World”. Departing from the traditional ethnic-studies- in-Canada perspective, the theme of this CESA conference intends to explicitly connect with transnationalism allowing reflection of current, dynamic and ongoing transformations of Canada and its ethnic community landscape in a globalized era. Constant population movements within, but also across national borders, alongside a much more extensive and complex communicational, informational and exchange network, are permanent features of a globalized world. Both population movements and intricate exchange networks signal the multiple economic, cultural, social, ideological and symbolic mobilities within and across states in transnational social spaces.

Such radical changes in the Canadian multicultural state necessitate that we recast traditional Canadian ethnic studies beyond ethnic communities to encompass (im)migrant movements, “mobilities,” not only within Canada but also over and beyond Canada. Even if it has been a myth that historians have debunked that previous immigrants to Canada rarely moved again globally, contemporary (im)migrants have complex and diverse forms of mobilities which have surpassed those of any previous imagination and have called into question not just borders, sovereignty and national states but also citizenship, belonging and the very nature of our multicultural mosaic. Furthermore, although for some mobility is a privilege that they enjoy and a tool they utilize to improve their social locations, for many mobility is forced, unwanted, and even resisted. What are the forces behind the creation of transnational social spaces, the mechanisms, routes, and processes, as well as the consequences of these radical changes in Canada and globally? How exactly do they change the Canadian multicultural mosaic, citizenship, identities and belonging? What can we expect of the 21st century with respect to such phenomena? Within this larger problematic, CESA invites theoretical and empirically-based papers, fully formed panels or presentations in other formats, addressing, from a variety of disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspectives, more specific topics such as:

  • The future of immigration, ethnic studies, and multiculturalism
  • Intersections of immigration and race, class and gender
  • Voluntary and forced mobilities: Refugees and the Canadian state
  • Youth, ethnicity, and identity in multicultural Canada
  • Ethnic communities, global diasporas and transnationalism in Canada
  • “Homelands”: Memories, reconstructions, returns and directions forward
  • Citizenship and belonging in transnational spaces
  • Gender, class, and ethnic intersections in transnationalism
  • The future of transnational and ethnic mobilities in an unsettled world

Conference organizers welcome proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, posters and video presentations that address any of these and other related topics. Organizers invite submissions from a variety of perspectives, academic disciplines, and areas of study. We will endeavour to make a decision shortly after the abstract is received in order to facilitate those who need verification of their acceptance for travel funding purposes at their own institutions.

Who should attend? In addition to members of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association, the conference will be relevant to a wide range of people interested in history, ethnicity, race, immigration and citizenship issues in Canada and internationally. University professors, graduate students, other researchers and teachers; policymakers and civil servants from all levels of government; those who work in various non-governmental organizations, as well as those involved as frontline workers delivering various kinds of social services – all of these will find that this conference offers them worthwhile information, challenging critical perspectives, and an opportunity to network and discuss important issues with people from across the country and from a variety of academic disciplines and institutional perspectives. A special issue of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Journal will showcase selected papers from the conference. To be considered for publication, papers must be submitted no later than four weeks after the conference. Papers must be written in accordance with the journal’s guidelines.

All abstracts should be no longer than 250 words and will be refereed by the CESA Program Committee. Individual conference presentations will normally be 20 minutes in length, and conference sessions will be 90 minutes. Abstracts should be directed electronically to [email protected].

CESA will provide a $600 subsidy for conference presenters who stay at the Banff Springs Hotel. This subsidy will be provided for the first 50 presenters who register for the conference.

Please visit our new website: http://www.cesa-scee.ca for more information.

The deadline for submission of proposals for papers, sessions, panels, roundtables, and poster presentations is February 15th, 2018.

May
1
Wed
2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies
May 1 all-day

2019 African Critical Inquiry Workshop: African Ethnographies

The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is pleased to announce that the 2019 ACIP workshop will be African Ethnographies. The project was proposed and will be organized by colleagues at the University of the Western Cape, Jung Ran Annachiara Forte (Lecturer, Department of Anthropology and Sociology) and Sakhumzi Mfecane (Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology and Sociology). Activities will take place in Cape Town, South Africa.

African Ethnographies
While the practice of ethnography has a long history in Africa, insufficient debate has emerged around it recently on the African continent. Far from being specific only to anthropology, ethnography has become a widespread mode of knowing inside and outside academic spaces. We would like to prompt reflection around this concept and practice, which is slippery, changing, dense, polysemic, and composed of a plurality of voices. The African Ethnographies workshop will raise questions about ethnography across disciplines, its contemporary forms – not exclusively written, and its publics. Ethnography enables conceptual work that transcends simple divides between the empirical, the methodological, and the theoretical. The workshop is particularly interested in understanding how ethnography and its conceptual work can allow us to grasp the complexities of contemporary African worlds, their precariousness, and their becomings. We are interested in exploring: (1) the work of theorization that ethnography makes possible; (2) understandings of public ethnography today; and finally (3) ways to re-rethink ethnography from the African continent. The workshop seeks to open a space of dialogue by bringing together emerging scholars across different disciplines and from institutions across Africa. By engaging in discussions around theory, methods, public engagements, and ethnographic sensibilities and modes of expression, we hope to better understand the challenges of doing ethnography in Africa’s contemporary worlds. The workshop will include a performance/ lecture that explores the performative potential of ethnographic work and will result in both an edited book and a film about ethnography based on the workshop and interviews with participants.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

Founded in 2012, the African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at University of the Western Cape in Cape Town and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta. Supported by donations to the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund, the ACIP fosters thinking and working across public cultural institutions, across disciplines and fields, and across generations. It seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa through an annual ACIP workshop and through the Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards, which support African doctoral students in the humanities and humanistic social sciences enrolled at South African universities.

Information about applying to organize the 2020 ACIP workshop and for the 2019 Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards will be available in November 2018. The deadline for both workshop applications and student applications is 1 May 2019.

For further information, see http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html and https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund.

Call for Proposals to Organize a 2020 Workshop
May 1 all-day

AFRICAN CRITICAL INQUIRY PROGRAMME

“Who defines the needs of the people and the related epistemologies that serve them?” (Karp & Masolo 2000:10)

CALL FOR PROPOSALS TO ORGANISE A WORKSHOP

Closing Date: Wednesday 1 May 2019

The African Critical Inquiry Programme invites proposals from scholars and/or practitioners in public cultural institutions in South Africa to organise a workshop to take place in 2020. The African Critical Inquiry Programme (ACIP) seeks to advance inquiry and debate about the roles and practice of public culture, public cultural institutions, and public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa. The ACIP is committed to collaboration between scholars and the makers of culture/history, and to fostering inquiry into the politics of knowledge production, the relationships between the colonial/apartheid and the postcolonial/postapartheid, and the importance of critical pluralism as against nationalist discourse. ACIP is a partnership between the Centre for Humanities Research at the University of the Western Cape and the Laney Graduate School of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia (USA).

ACIP Workshops are intended as annual occasions to identify and address critical themes, fundamental questions and pressing practical issues concerning public culture. For instance, Workshops might focus on particular questions and issues related to publics, visuality, museums and exhibitions, art, performance, representational forms, or institutional forms from diverse methodological, practical, and theoretical vantages. They might examine forms and practices of public scholarship and the theories, histories and systems of thought that shape and illuminate public culture and public scholarship. Workshops should encourage comparative, interdisciplinary and cross-institutional interchange and reflection that bring into conversation public scholarship in Africa, creative cultural production, and critical theory. Workshop budgets will vary depending on proposed plans; the maximum award is ZAR 60,000.

 

Workshop Themes and Formats: Working with a different focus each year, the ACIP Workshop will facilitate and energise conversations among scholars and practitioners drawn from universities, museums, and other cultural organisations, seeking to bridge institutional silos and boundaries. The ACIP Workshop should help place research and public scholarship within broader frames, work against institutional isolation, facilitate collaborative research relations and discussions, and build a cohort of scholars and practitioners who talk across fields, across generations, and across institutions. Proposed Workshops will be selected with an eye to cultivating these goals.

Proposed Workshop themes should focus on issues and questions that foster critical examination and debate about forms, practices and institutions of public culture. Themes should be addressed from multiple orientations and disciplines and include comparative perspectives. Workshops should be planned to engage participants across different institutions of public culture, including universities, museums, arts and culture organisations, NGOs, or others appropriate to the topic. Abstracts for previously funded ACIP Workshops are available here.

 

The Workshop might use a range of formats as appropriate. Examples of formats that might be proposed or combined:

  • a standard workshop of 2-3 days, with specific sessions, presentations, discussants, pre-circulated papers or readings, etc. Variations on this format might also be introduced. Preferred timing for such workshops is March 2020.
  • a working group of colleagues and postgraduate students drawn from across institutions that meet regularly over several weeks or months to discuss common readings and work in progress; visitors who work on the group’s central theme and issues might be invited to give public lectures, participate in group meetings, mentor students, etc.
  •  a collaborative teaching programme with a common postgraduate course, or module of a course, taught in parallel at different universities with various modes of coordination and interaction, with participants coming together for a 1 day workshop at the end.
  • a distinguished scholar or cultural practitioner invited as a short-term Public Scholar in Residence (PSR) to bring fresh, comparative perspectives to particular issues and debates through public lectures, participation in a standard workshop, consultations with colleagues at institutions of public culture, and meetings with students supported by ACIP’s Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards. The visitor might also contribute to courses as appropriate.

Workshop organisers will work through the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape for basic financial administration and are responsible for complying with CHR policies. Workshop organisers should submit a letter from the host institution, centre, programme, or department confirming that appropriate administrative and institutional support will be available.

We ask Workshop organisers to incorporate appropriate modes of participation for postgraduate students holding current Ivan Karp Doctoral Research Awards from ACIP so that they have opportunities to consult with Workshop participants. Prior holders of Ivan Karp awards may also wish to attend and we encourage organisers to include students from a range of higher education institutions.

 

Who Should Apply: Applications may be submitted by experienced scholars and cultural practitioners based in universities, museums, and other cultural organisations in South Africa who are interested in creating or reinvigorating interdisciplinary, cross-institutional engagement and understanding and who are committed to training the next generations of scholar-practitioners. Applications may be submitted by a single individual or a pair of individuals who have different institutional affiliations and bring different perspectives, approaches, or specialisations to the proposed Workshop theme.

 

How to Apply: Interested applicants should submit the following as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed:

  • completed cover sheet (at http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html)
  •  abstract of the proposed Workshop theme, focus and plan (250 word max.)
  • two to three page statement defining the proposed Workshop theme and focus, its significance, the questions and issues it addresses, and how it relates to the African Critical Inquiry Programme. The statement should also describe the Workshop format and why it will be effective.
  • list of proposed participants with their affiliations, brief bios and descriptions of how their work relates to the Workshop
  • plan of work and schedule for organising the Workshop
  • preliminary Workshop budget that explains and justifies expenses
  • two page curriculum vitae (for each organiser)
  • institutional letter of commitment to host the Workshop. Please describe available administrative and logistical support in this letter and/or your work plan
  • two reference letters addressing the significance of the proposed Workshop and appropriateness of the format and plan should be submitted directly to the Selection Committee.

The Workshop theme description and plan of work should specify topics or sessions to be included, address the nature and value of the interdisciplinary and cross-institutional exchange to be undertaken, and indicate whether particular outcomes or products are envisioned. It should be written in a way that will be accessible to non-specialist reviewers.

Each Workshop may apply for up to ZAR 60,000. to support Workshop activities and planning. Applicants need not apply for the full amount. Funds may be used to pay honoraria, cover out of town participants’ travel costs, purchase materials, establish a website, promote Workshop activities, hire a student assistant to help with organisation, and cover other related expenses. Workshops are strongly encouraged to supplement the ACIP funding with other sources of support.

 

Selection Criteria: All proposals will be reviewed by the ACIP Selection Committee; successful applicants will be notified as soon as possible after the closing date so they may begin planning for the Workshop. Applications will be evaluated on the following criteria:

 

Conceptualisation: Does the proposed Workshop identify and address significant themes, questions and issues concerning the roles and practices of public culture, public cultural institutions, and various forms of public scholarship in shaping identities and society in Africa? Does it combine disciplines and create cross- institutional conversations in new and/or interesting ways? How are comparative dimensions incorporated into the Workshop? How will the proposed Workshop develop cross-generational relations and conversations? Will the Workshop make possible new forms of knowledge, innovative approaches, or new kinds of exchange?

 

Appropriateness: Does the proposed Workshop theme relate to questions and issues relevant to African Critical Inquiry? Are the Workshop plan and proposed set of participants appropriate, well thought out, and likely to be productive?

 

Workshop organiser(s): What qualifications and experience do applicants bring to organising the Workshop, including previous administration/organisation and interdisciplinary and cross-institutional engagements? How do the training, backgrounds, and approaches of a pair of applicants complement one another in formulating Workshop plans?

 

Impact: Will the proposed Workshop and design be effective in addressing the theme and foster interdisciplinary, cross-institutional, and cross-generational debate and engagement?

 

Applicants who organise an African Critical Inquiry Programme Workshop must acknowledge the support in all Workshop materials and in any publications that result and indicate affiliation with ACIP and the Centre for Humanities Research.

After completing the workshop, they must submit a final report and a financial report.

Closing date: Applications and referees’ letters must be received by Wednesday 1 May 2019. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Please submit materials as a single file attachment with documents in the order listed above. Applications should be sent by email with the heading “ACIP 2020 Workshop Proposal” to [email protected]

Supported by funding from the Ivan Karp and Corinne Kratz Fund  http://www.gs.emory.edu/about/special/acip.html  https://www.facebook.com/ivan.karp.corinne.kratz.fund