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Do you have an event you’d like to announce? A call for papers for a conference? Email all details to [email protected].

 

Sep
30
Sat
DADA Rivista di Antropologia post-globale CFP
Sep 30 all-day

DADA Rivista di Antropologia post-globale is a platform for scientific and academic discussion and critique. It  focuses on the contemporary analysis of  the post-global world. It is a multilingual and multidisciplinary online journal, which publishes contributions in anthropology, sociology, political science, philosophy and economics. Researchers and young scholars can submit their articles, papers and reviews in several languages, such as English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. DADA Rivista  is double blind peer-reviewed and open source, free of charge for readers, authors and institutions. It has biannual issues and special issues. Current call for papers concerning the special issues are the following: On“Conflict and Violence” (the deadline is June 30, 2017) and on “Debt and gift” (the deadline is September 30, 2017).  Please submit your contributions online.

Oct
1
Sun
Call For Papers: Linguistic Justice and Analytic Philosophy
Oct 1 all-day

Special issue of Philosophical Papers

Guest Editors: Filippo Contesi (Jean Nicod), Moti Mizrahi (Florida Tech) and Enrico Terrone (Turin)

Expected contributors include Eric Schwitzgebel (University of California, Riverside), Hans-Johann Glock (Zurich), Elisabetta Galeotti (Eastern Piedmont) and Eric Schliesser (Amsterdam)

The topics of linguistic discrimination and linguistic justice have received little attention from contemporary analytic philosophers despite the fact that there is a growing body of evidence in linguistics and social psychology about implicit negative biases towards speakers and writers perceived as non-native. In fact, issues of linguistic discrimination and justice are particularly urgent in analytic philosophy because English is undoubtedly the lingua francaof contemporary analytic philosophy. For this reason, it is important to think about what it means to be a person for whom English is not a first language and who tries to participate in the academic life of contemporary analytic philosophy.

The aim of this special issue of Philosophical Papers is to consider the circumstances of being a non-native speaker and writer of English in analytic philosophy. In addition to philosophical and meta-philosophical perspectives, we also encourage submissions from different approaches and disciplines, including psychology, linguistics and the social sciences.

Possible questions for discussion include (but are by no means limited to):

  • Is there linguistic discrimination or injustice in analytic philosophy? If so, what should we do about it?
  • Are the percentages of non-native-speaker faculty members of the most reputable analytic philosophy departments comparable to those in arts and humanities and STEM departments? What should any differences teach us?
  • How can diversity of native languages and cultures be beneficial, if at all, to analytic philosophy?
  • Are perceived linguistic fluency and eloquence important factors in philosophical writing and presenting? Should they be?
  • Is it true, as is sometimes claimed, that publishing philosophical work in the most reputable venues in contemporary analytic philosophy only requires linguistic competence of a level that is reasonably easy for a non-native writer to achieve?
  • Should English (or any other language) be the lingua franca of contemporary analytic philosophy?
  • Should study and research in analytic philosophy be a global and cosmopolitan enterprise?
  • What if any extra policies can or should professional journals or institutions adopt to address any specific difficulties faced by non-native speakers and writers?
  • Are there any precedents in the history of intellectual communities, including contemporary ones and those in different philosophical traditions, that can provide a useful model of how to approach linguistic justice issues in analytic philosophy?
  • How do linguistic justice issues intersect with issues of race, ethnicity or nationality (or other issues)? How important are such intersections (or lack thereof)?

The deadline for receipt of submissions is 1 October, 2017. This issue of Philosophical Papers, comprising both invited and submitted articles, will appear in March 2018.

Authors should submit manuscripts electronically, as a PDF or MS Word document attachment, to the Managing Editor of Philosophical Papers
at [email protected]. Authors must include their full name, affiliation, and address for email correspondence with their submission.

Further inquiries may be addressed to Filippo Contesi ([email protected]) or Ward Jones ([email protected]).

http://contesi.wordpress.com/cfp

Oct
20
Fri
APA Technology, Mind, and Society Call for Papers
Oct 20 all-day
The American Psychological Association will hold an interdisciplinary conference on Technology, Mind, and Society in Washington, DC, on April 5-7, 2018. Scientists, practitioners, policymakers, and students from around the world are invited to participate in the event.

The conference will provide a venue for reporting and assessing current efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology, for identifying priorities for future work, and for promoting exchange and collaboration among participants. The conference will feature four keynote speakers: Cynthia Breazeal (MIT), Justine Cassell (Carnegie Mellon), Eric Horvitz (Microsoft Research), and Sandy Pentland (MIT).

APA invites you and your colleagues and students to submit papers, symposia, and posters for this conference, which will be organized around the following broad themes:

  • Basic research: How humans understand and use technology, impacts of technology on human experience and behavior, human-technology interactions as mutually adaptive systems, role of technology in advancing other areas of scientific research, and related topics.
  • Foundations of technology design: Development of technologies informed by psychological, behavioral, and social science research.
  • Applications: Development, use, and impact of specific technologies in domains such as aging, education, mental and physical health, recreation, and the workplace.
  • Broader implications: Ethical and policy questions concerning the opportunities and challenges arising from human-technology interactions.

The deadline for submissions is October 20, 2017. Submissions can be made here.

The conference is open to researchers, professionals, and students in all relevant areas, including psychology and other behavioral and social sciences, neuroscience, computer science, engineering, design, health research, education research, city and regional planning, public policy, history of science and technology, and philosophy.

The conference aims to address the full range of contemporary and emerging technologies. These include but are not limited to artificial intelligence, robotics, mobile devices, social media, virtual/augmented reality, gaming, geographic information systems, autonomous vehicles, and biomedical technologies (e.g., brain-machine interfaces, genetic engineering).

APA is sponsoring the conference in cooperation with the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) and the Association for Computing Machinery — Special Interest Group for Computer-Human Interaction (ACM SIGCHI).

We look forward to seeing you at the Technology, Mind, and Society Conference! For additional information, see the conference website. If you have any questions, please contact the APA Science Directorate ([email protected]).

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