English or Russian?

Language Ideologies in Multilingual Khorog, Tajikistan While perusing wikileaks for information on English in Khorog, Tajikistan, the administrative centre of Gorno Badakhshan Autonomous Region, I noticed a cable sent in 2008 from the American Embassy, Dushanbe. It was entitled “Tajikistan — Why American Corners Matter,” and it describes Khorog as an ideal location for a […]

Understanding Practitioner-Academic Department Relationships

At AAA meetings and within academic units, we often hear a call for students to learn from non-university based practicing anthropologists. Such anthropologists bring a unique set of skills and perspectives that add great value to student training. While the incentive for academic units to develop relationships with practicing anthropologists is clear, CoPAPIA was interested […]

Occupational Ethnography in the Taiwan Sunflower and Hong Kong Umbrella Movements

On March 18, 2014, several hundred Taiwanese student and civil activists broke into the Legislative Yuan, the parliament of the contested island nation, launching the Sunflower Movement, a protest against the ruling Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) and aligned business elites’ alleged collusion with authoritarian China to pass a highly controversial trade deal. It took 24 […]

Plastic Thoughts on Disasters

The People’s Climate March and the Shores of Krakatau On Sunday, September 21, participants in the People’s Climate March filled the streets of New York City from 86th to 59th Streets on Central Park West before progressing slowly, under heavy police control, to 34th Street. The event was deliberately timed by the environmental organization 350.org […]

Buffalo’s Revival

Buffalo, New York has a long-standing and ill-fated reputation for poverty and crime. It has been named one of the poorest and most recently, dreariest cities in America. However, in recent years Buffalo has been transitioning into a new place of social and economic revival. The memories of a booming, industrial, and successful city no […]

Digital Counterpublics

Black Twitter in the Aftermath of Ferguson   On November 24, 2014, St Louis prosecutor McCulloch announced that the grand jury trial did not indict Officer Darren Wilson for the murder of Michael Brown. As the news media reports and subsequent protests unfolded, the Twittersphere erupted in thousands of tweets condemning the non-indictment, especially given […]

Back to the Field: Reflections on Sweet Briar College Closing

The closing of Sweet Briar College represents the end of a staunch Southern tradition. I arrived on campus in 1981 as a newly minted PhD from SUNY-Binghamton, the only Asian-American member of the small faculty (70 plus). Single-sex education seemed to be an anachronism. I was surprised and startled by women’s education at Sweet Briar […]

Suddenly Liminal: Reflections on Sweet Briar College Closing

On Tuesday, March 3, faculty and staff at Sweet Briar College were summoned by a morning email to a noon meeting with the president and the chairman of the board. We sat in stunned silence as we were told that the college would close on June 30, and that we would not know whether there […]

Launching a Career in Academia

The idea for this article was suggested to me by Lloyd Miller and was the result of a SACC listserv discussion initiated by Anthony Balzano, a professor of anthropology and sociology at Sussex County Community College in New York, on the issue of “launching a career in academia.” To prepare for the AAA meetings held […]

AAA Career Expo(sed)

Anthropologists Who Work for the Department of Veterans Affairs Fourteen years ago, I attended my first AAA meetings. My most vivid memory from those meetings, besides eating sushi for the first time, was of Nancy Scheper-Hughes and Paul Farmer debating the merits of public and applied anthropology before a packed house. Anthropologists continue to engage […]