Anthropologists and the Moynihan Report

Family Structure, Race and Poverty Ours is a society which presumes male leadership in private and public affairs. The arrangements of society facilitate such leadership and reward it. A sub-culture, such as that of the Negro American, in which this is not the pattern, is placed at a distinct disadvantage. —DP Moynihan, The Negro Family: […]

Indian Mascots: Naturalized Racism and Anthropology

The month of September ushers in another season of professional football. Native Americans across the country will have to endure yet another year of public humiliation. The professional football team from Washington DC continues to use their racist moniker with impunity. How is it, in the Nation’s capital, such a public display of racist language […]

Steward the Past and Avoid Harm

The ethical guidelines of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) call archaeologists to stewardship, and exhort us to serve as “both caretakers of and advocates for the archaeological record for the benefit of all people.” To act for the benefit of “all people” is, however, easier said than done and our efforts to steward the […]

Why You Should Consider Applying for the AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowship

Are you about to complete your PhD and want to do something other than become an adjunct? Or are you perhaps safely tenured but want to make a contribution in government rather than in academia? (“Ask not what your country can do for you…”) Or maybe you’re just curious and would like to find out […]

Ethnographic Fieldwork Equipment That (Hopefully) Won’t Break the Bank: Digital Cameras

Digital Cameras In the first installment of “Ethnographic Fieldwork Equipment That (Hopefully) Won’t Break the Bank,” we examined a series of digital audio recording devices ranging in price from $100 to over $400. This time, we consider both digital single-lens reflex—or DSLR—and mirrorless cameras. As with the previous entry in this four part series, this column […]

Some Observations about Student Expectations

Even after 15 years of teaching at a community college, the unpredictable nature of our students’ expectations continues to amaze me. I was foolishly convinced that if you offered meaningful information in a fair and interesting way, challenged your students thinking (forcing them to become critical thinkers), and provided a degree of rigor that made each […]

Experiential Learning

Teaching Ethnography at the Border Experiential Learning at Colorado College At Colorado College we follow a unique schedule, known as the Block Plan. As part of our Block Plan, our academic year is divided into eight, three and a half week, blocks. Each block students take one course, and it is the only course that […]

Two Anthropologists Look beyond Diplomacy for a Peace Framework in South Sudan

Sharon E Hutchinson (U Wisconsin–Madison) and Naomi R Pendle (London School of Economics and Political Science) have just published “Violence, legitimacy, and prophecy: Nuer struggles with uncertainty in South Sudan” in American Ethnologist. Their article is particularly timely because July 2015 marks the fourth anniversary of independence for South Sudan, which is the world’s newest […]

Ukraine’s Long Road to “Decommunization”

On May 15, 2015, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko signed into law four pieces of legislation referred to collectively as “Decommunization Laws.” The adoption of these laws comes more than a year after mass mobilizations that took place across the country, often known as EuroMaidan. A complex moment of enormous significance in Ukraine’s history, these mobilisations defined a […]