Paths Not Taken

Ethnographic Terminalia and Career Choices There is something about the AAA meetings that lends itself to reflection, which also seems fitting as we kick off a new year. It could be the timing. Typically held in the run-up to Thanksgiving, this year AAA was held between the major holidays, and there was a sense that […]

Militarizing Life

What Policing, Events in Ferguson, and Immigration Enforcement Say about Regimes of Social Control Recent protests on policing have drawn attention to the alarming amount of minority deaths that occur at police officers’ hands, reviving conversations about racial profiling, relationships minority populations have with police officers, and racism in the United States generally. Several social […]

Racialized Policing, Violence and Latinas/os

On December 8, 2014, outgoing US Attorney General Eric Holder announced the long awaited release of the Justice Department’s Guidance on racial profiling in federal law enforcement. The 2014 Guidance represents an improvement over the 2003 Guidance in so far as it expands the protected categories to include gender identity, national origin, religion, and sexual […]

Space of Mediation

Why do international labor recruiters in China charge so much, and why are they difficult to regulate? Unskilled Chinese workers pay an average of US$8,000 (including US$ 3,000 security bond that would be confiscated if they violate any rules) in 2010 to secure a job in Japan, Singapore and South Korea, their top three choices. […]

What Wilderness?

I love reading, writing, teaching, and engaging in research about the environment, so much so that I spend a large part of my year, when I am not teaching, traveling to field sites that help me better understand the environment and our relation to it.  Particularly fascinating to me is the conflict that exists regarding […]

On Being a Near-Native Speaker

On my recent trip to Bolivia, my mother-in-law looked at me curiously, then commented, “You know, Anna, you sound almost just like us.  But there’s always something; there’s always some little thing…” she shook her head, as if trying and failing to put her finger on what, exactly, made me different. While the insider/outsider dichotomy […]

Food for all in Latin America

Access to food is critical in several Latin American countries.What have been the self-organized responses to accessing food for all in Latin America? How have some of the governmental administrations responded to these issues? Over the past twenty years, peasants and rural families organized as worldwide coalitions or movements such as Vía Campesina. Other coalitions, […]

Self-organization, Integration and Homeless People

Some people are stigmatized as excluded, marginalized, the poor, extreme poor people, homeless and helpless, and other categories with which western capitalist societies tend to label the living situation of people who do not conform to common sense patterns of the market economy. Palleres (2004) has documented that over time, people living on the streets […]

Anthropology in the High School Classroom II

Including Anthropology in a high school curriculum provides important opportunities for students and instructors, but it also presents unique challenges. In this second installment of a two-part interview with Dexter Chapin, anthropology instructor at Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences (SAAS) in downtown Seattle, WA, he reflects further on the significance of  teaching cultural anthropology […]