Protecting Undocumented Students Post-Election

From meeting to action. Working together to support our students.   In the wake of the recent presidential election, we find ourselves reflecting deeply on our roles as teachers, researchers, and scholars. As anthropologists, we grapple with a historical moment that challenges our values of multiculturalism, diversity, and inclusion, values to which we have dedicated […]

Genetics, Race, and the Practice of Science, Part Two

On how human genetics is biopolitical. Earlier this year Jonathan Marks and I sat down at the University of Notre Dame for a conversation about his recent books, Tales of the Ex-Apes: How We Think about Human Evolution (2015) and Is Science Racist? (2017), and many of the ideas he covers, including scientific racism, power […]

Genetics, Race, and the Practice of Science, Part One

On how the humanities help us think critically about science. Jonathan Marks and I have a lot in common (despite the fact that I am a Christian feminist theologian and he is a biological anthropologist). We are both interested in human wrongdoing and how intellectual practices can function to either prop up human wrongdoing or […]

Human Trafficking in a Time of Crisis

How exaggerated media reports misconceive the realities of migration and displacement.   We’ve joined forces with AAA’s latest public education initiative “World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration” to launch an ongoing series of articles on migration and displacement. Click here for all our World on the Move articles. The current refugee crisis […]

Displacing Community

In Baltimore development isn’t just about “business getting built”—it’s also about community relations.   We’ve joined forces with AAA’s latest public education initiative “World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration” to launch an ongoing series of articles on migration and displacement. Click here for all our World on the Move articles. As I […]

Mourning in Orlando

Latinx memorials force us to question the whiteness of queer identity and national memorialization. On June 12, 2016, a gunman armed with an AR-15-style rifle opened fire at Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 and wounding 53 others, in what was hailed as the deadliest mass shooting in US history. While the shooting was […]

Islam Is Not Our Enemy

Post-Orlando vigils reveal ways in which Islamophobia and homophobia interact. In the weeks following the Orlando nightclub shooting on June 12, 2016, thousands of people across the United States took part in vigils to mourn the 49 victims. I attended a vigil in Kalamazoo, the Western Michigan city where I live and teach, a few […]

Surviving with Guns in Rural Arizona

Fears and beliefs about guns are key to a survivalist culture of self-reliance. A rural silence of twittering birds hung over the remote Arizona settlement built by a motley gang of young men who called themselves “survivalists”. Suddenly, I heard someone yelling, “Tom! Tom!”—the name of the alpha male of the pack. I looked around […]

Trigger Happy with Gunspeak

Our speech echoes the gun-obsessed society in which Americans live. After I was invited to pull the trigger on this article, to draw a bead on gunspeak, to give it my best shot, to target a familiar way our speech is shaped, I began to sweat bullets. I wanted to take another shot at this […]

Could a Trump Presidency Bring Back the Termination Era?

Election Day stakes are high for Native Americans. The 2016 presidential election is almost here and the stakes could not be higher for Native American communities. This election represents not only a choice between starkly different approaches to policy, but distinct ideological perspectives on treaty rights, indigeneity and Native self-determination. Donald J. Trump represents a […]