Futurecasting Anthropology

Futurists are scientists that use data analysis, ethnographic methods and other scientific procedures to design and make predictions about our future. To do this, they do something called futurecasting. Futurecasting is the process of mixing of social science, data, economic analysis, technology and conversation as a predictor of what may be the future of humans. […]

An Anthropological Endeavor

I was very inquisitive about having the opportunity of understanding how two anthropologists, Gretchen Bakke and Marina Peterson, formed their content for an upcoming publication pertaining to anthropology of the arts. Considering my own approaches to choosing the content for my Anthropology News columns, I did not want to approach my writing as a traditional […]

Beyond the Audit

Anthropologists Finding Careers at the Government Accountability Office   In recent years, several colleagues and I from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) have had the opportunity to participate in the NAPA-sponsored career expo held at the AAA Annual meeting. The event staffed by practicing anthropologists from federal agencies, non-profit and private sector organizations sharing career […]

Steward the Past and Avoid Harm

The ethical guidelines of the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) call archaeologists to stewardship, and exhort us to serve as “both caretakers of and advocates for the archaeological record for the benefit of all people.” To act for the benefit of “all people” is, however, easier said than done and our efforts to steward the […]

Site and Motion of Graffiti

Graffiti is part of public visual culture that can represent a political stance or serve as an art form. An Anthropological documentation in a specific geographic site and an artist’s analysis of motion in the creative process considers the impact graffiti has on a sense of public space. I have chosen these two approaches, which […]

Anthropologists at the Table

The question of what an anthropology degree means, especially in cultural anthropology, has been asked ever since I was an undergraduate (back when I saw Pigpen on keyboards with the Dead). As things change, in the academy as in the world around us, there is a certain renewed urgency in that question, as we prepare […]

Characterizing Tribal Cultural Landscapes

A Collaborative Approach to Resource Management Historically, federal policy and legislation artificially divide management of natural and cultural resources—a system that doesn’t work on many levels. As an archaeologist working in the historic preservation community, I believe a paradigm shift is happening, and that the Tribal Cultural Landscape (TCL) approach can provide a way to […]

Killing Atticus Finch

The literary event of the past summer was undoubtedly the release, on July 14, of Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee. As Joe Nocera argued in the New York Times, the ethics behind the decision to publish were at best questionable. Lee, who is an invalid, effectively lost control over her literary estate when […]

An Epidemiologic Anthropology: Considerations when Employing Mixed Methods

Anthropology versus Epidemiology Anthropologists and epidemiologists have contributed vital knowledge to understanding public health problems such as low birth weight, reemerging disease, mental health, and more. Lively and enduring dialogue on the potential for collaboration between the disciplines was sparked in the ‘80s by Janes et al.’s (1986) Anthropology and Epidemiology and True’s (1990) chapter […]