“Sometimes an Action Is Ripe to Happen”

“What was the vision for AFA at its founding?” I ask. Naomi Quinn’s (one of three founders of AFA) response was simple: “We three just filled a hole we thought needed filling.”

“It’s a White Disease!”

Following in a black feminist epistemological tradition, a key element of my work is to insert black people, who are often subjugated in ALS knowledge production, as both objects of knowledge production and producers of knowledge. What is ALS like for black people? Are they being diagnosed? Are they being misdiagnosed? What social and political structures are in place that make access to care challenging?

Skill and Care in Horse Racing’s Labor Hierarchy

The Culture & Agriculture Sensorium explores the intersections between sensory experiences, agri-food systems, and the socio-political conventions surrounding food production. In this installation, Rebecca Richard explores the role of touch in the care of race horses and the place of this skill within horse racing’s labor hierarchy.

What Does Diversity and Inclusion Mean?

In the spirit of creating alternatives to capitalism that also recognize the importance of advocating for institutionally marginalized students, I suggest that we ask: What does diversity and inclusion mean to our departments and to our schools?

Duke’s Chinese Email Firestorm Shows Us What Social Change Looks Like

In January, an email from a Duke Professor went viral. This professor was talking about language. Specifically, the language of Chinese students in her program. She recommended that they not speak “Chinese” with each other when in the Duke Biostatistics Department.

Nature at the Intersection

In today’s world, where the tentacles of science delve into our humanity in ways most of us could only imagine a generation ago, the space that falls at the intersection between the biological and social sciences has become more critical than ever to operationalize.

Scharlette Holdman

Scharlette Holdman, anthropologist and pioneering opponent of the death penalty, died on July 12, 2017. She was born on December 11, 1946, in Memphis, Tennessee. During the 1960s she became an activist registering black voters in the South, but her opposition to the death penalty became the focus of her activism and life’s work.

2018 AfAA Student Paper Awards

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2018 Association for Africanist Anthropology (AfAA) Student Paper Awards. Once again, we received strong submissions for both awards and have been impressed with the focus and quality of the research.