What Can Fossils Tell Us about Early Human Diets?

Happy National Fossil Day! Fossils are among the most thrill-inducing traces of the past to discover. These preserved remains of once-living organisms, usually more than 10,000 years old, are a primary source of evidence about the past. For a paleoanthropologist like me who is interested in reconstructing the diets of ancient humans, fossils are invaluable clues to that help piece together a puzzle that is inevitably incomplete.

Constance R. Sutton

Constance R. Sutton, a significant figure in Caribbean studies and feminist anthropology, died in New York City on August 23, 2018. She was 92.

White Patriarchy Gets a Pacifier

In less than the time it takes you to read this, someone in the United States will be sexually assaulted. One person is assaulted every 98 seconds; almost 37 people in an hour and 888 people a day. There is less than a 1 percent chance that any given perpetrator will go to jail. Rape is underreported, under-prosecuted, and disbelieved. Ours, as anthropologist Peggy Sanday might say, is a rape prone society.

Raising Health Expectations for Schizophrenia Patients

Blood tests, echocardiograms, waist measurements, and body weigh-ins comprise a cyclic apparatus of health checks at clozapine clinics. Most patients have a diagnosis of “treatment-resistant schizophrenia,” but their clinical records are mostly filled with cardio-metabolic concerns. Having a “clozapine belly”—as one patient described their weight gain to me—becomes normalized in the clinic waiting room.

Motherhood in the Field

My daughter Luna is now eight months old, chubby, with a wide-mouthed smile and bright eyes. I’m here to study community responses to youth “return” from the United States and Mexico—return often, although not always, being a sanitized word for deportation. We have been in Guatemala eight weeks now, long enough to begin settling in, and slowly to understand the vastness of what I don’t understand.

Creating Space for Veterans’ Voices in the Production of Knowledge

Anthropologists grapple with the responsibility of producing knowledge about other people. From understanding values and beliefs to practices and behaviors, the act of generating knowledge about others is an exercise of power that few other disciplines acknowledge or regularly reflect upon. The methodological tools of our discipline—ethnography, qualitative interviews, participant observation—are fundamentally relational and afford […]

Gramsci, Ethnography, and “Class”

Kate Crehan talks with Marek Mikuš about his recent monograph Frontiers of Civil Society: Government and Hegemony in Serbia (Berghahn 2018) and how the work of Antonio Gramsci can inspire anthropological thinking about civil society and inequality.

Reclaiming a Broken Future for the Past

The revolution in information and communications technologies, which had so much promise for broadening access and participation in scholarship, certainly seems much darker and more ominous now. Social media platforms have been weaponized to subvert democracies and weirdly globalize local nationalisms.

Hyung Il Pai

June 14, 1958–May 28, 2018 Hyung Il Pai died on May 28, 2018. Born in South Korea, Pai was an archeologist of Northeast Asia whose incisive critiques of Korean archeology led her from an exploration of colonial and postcolonial reconstructions of the Korean past into questions of how Korean “heritage,” as both concept and institutions, […]