Editors Edit

Ilana Gershon asked seven editors for their insights on questions that authors of books commonly ask. Five are press editors (Berghahn, Chicago, Indiana, Princeton, Stanford) and two are series editors.

Translanguaging is Everywhere

For over three years now I’ve been keeping a blog about something I call “citizen sociolinguistics”—the work people do to make sense of everyday communication and share their sense-making with others. This is my small way of supporting the Council on Anthropology and Education’s goal to “promote research, policies and practices” that are “close to the voices of the participant communities” and “sensitive to participant experiences and social contexts.”

“Moving On” from the Ongoing

On March 18, 2018, Stephon “Zoe” Clark was shot in his grandmother’s backyard 20 times, at least six in the back, by two Sacramento Police officers. In the resulting community-led protests, shutdowns, and ceremonies, the 23-year-old father of two has been poignantly mourned for the singular person he was, while his name joins the litany of African-American men, women, boys and girls who have been victims of police aggression and homicide.

Terrorist Students, Terrorist Academics

I admire the bravery of those who continue to put their lives and livelihoods at stake by making their dissent visible in public. But I also realize that the consequences that they will face for their valiance will be dire.

A Conversation with Kristen Ghodsee

Maryna Bazylevych interviews Kristen Ghodsee about ethnographic writing, mentorship, and being a “critical humanist.”

Meddling

When the news broke that Special Counsel Robert Mueller III indicted a Russian “troll farm” and 13 individuals associated with it, news and commentary reacted with outrage over the allegations that a foreign government had interfered in a US election.

Pride without Prestige

The Northern League focused on the civilizational divide between an abstract idea of Europe, Mitteleuropa (Central Europe)–the superior trans-alpine North in the international order of things– which represents a high culture with its implied Germanic and supposedly high race, and the rest of the world, especially Muslims and Africans who are constructed as uncivilized, primitive, and violent. Framing themselves as Europeans as opposed to immigrants, not only compensate for their prestige deficit but also satisfy their bourgeoisie ideology that is based on a self-perception of being civilized, pure, hard-working, and therefore rich people, thereby rescuing them from the label of being a quasi-member of the global precariat.

Evolutionary Anthropology Graduate Programs V

This is the last in our series highlighting US graduate programs in evolutionary anthropology (EA). All programs were asked to answer the following six questions. Abbreviated responses from Harvard, Rutgers, Binghamton, Yale, and Albany are included.

Tax Cuts and Higher Education

Tax cuts in the recent past have primarily benefited the richest sections of the American population, with more than a third of all Bush administration tax cuts benefiting the richest 1 percent, leaving barely 20 percent for the lowest earning 60 percent of the population. The rationale driving such tax cuts that overwhelmingly benefit the rich is that once the owners of capital have less of a tax burden, they can invest in the economy, thereby setting in motion dynamics that trickle benefits such as jobs and wages downward to the rest of the population.

Tales from and about the Field

Last summer, I launched the Olosho Ethnobotany project in Narok, Kenya. This community-based project works with local Maasai men and women to document medicinal plant usage.