When the Wind is Called Haydar

“I came like water, like the wind I go,” Omar Khayyam said as he contemplated life. Rumi found an affinity between anger and the wind as he stated, “anger is like a strong wind; after a while it calms down but many of the tree branches are already broken.” However, he also saw beauty and […]

SLA Business Meeting Report

SLA Business Meeting Saturday, November 19th, 2016 For the complete report, please see the slideshow linked below: sla-2016-report-slideshow President’s Report Report on SLA Interdisciplinary Public Engagement Award: Supported invited colloquium at AAAL by Jonathan Rosa, Netta Avineri, Susan Blum, Eric Johnson, Bernard Perley, Kathleen Riley, and Ana Celia Zentella: “Applied Linguistics, Linguistic Anthropology, and Social […]

Photography In The House of Pakal

Between 2009 and 2014 I deployed a mix of ethnography, archaeology, and forensic science to examine the undocumented movement of people through the brutalizing Sonoran Desert of Arizona.  In 2015 I turned my attention towards those fleeing violence and poverty in the Golden Triangle of Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador and who must cross the […]

Left Behind by the World’s Wealthiest Military

Residents of Carroll County, Illinois feel like they’ve been left behind by federal government policies for a while, but not exactly in the way that popular narratives about Rustbelt communities might suggest. In this community, and hundreds of other communities like it across the country, the government itself—and more specifically, the Department of Defense—was the employer […]

“Purification From the Start”—Buddhist Recycling in Taiwan

On an August evening in the 1990s, Chengyen—a Buddhist nun who founded the Buddhist lay organization Tzuchi in 1966—was disturbed by the overwhelming amount of garbage in a night market on her way to give a speech. During this period, after the lift of martial law in Taiwan, Tzuchi was expanding rapidly and had become […]

Replacing the Lone Stranger with Evidence-Based Theory

Collaborative Fieldwork in Anthropology At the 115th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association this year, I was recruiting a graduate student whose former adviser had told the student that she should leave academia because she would never get hired or tenure at an R1 institution because of structural obstacles to women in the academy. […]

EAS at the 2016 AAA meetings in Minneapolis

The Evolutionary Anthropology Society had a productive 2016 and a successful showing at the 115th American Anthropological Association meetings in Minneapolis in November. This year, the EAS sponsored five sessions, including two invited sessions, that covered topics from an evolutionary perspective, ranging from inter-group relationships, health care and health outcomes, ethnographic experiences and the process […]

Making Sense of Post-Election US Realities through Post-Soviet Studies

On the morning after the US presidential elections, I met with students in the political anthropology course I am teaching this semester at a small liberal arts college in rural Vermont. It had been the first election for all of us: my students’ because of their recently reached voting age; mine because of my recently […]

Report for the SEAA Student Activities

Since 2005, Society of East Asian Anthropology (SEAA) has started Graduate Student Mentoring Workshop during the American Anthropology Association annual meetings. Over a decade, the spirit of the workshop has been to provide graduate students with opportunities to communicate with junior and senior scholars in the area of East Asian Anthropology and get better prepared […]

The Other Scholars

Thinking About Knowledge Reproduction in Anthropology This piece is a compilation of papers presented at the 2016 meeting for the Association for Feminist Epistemologies, Methodologies, Metaphysics, and Science Studies at the University of Notre Dame, October 2016.  They billed it as “Dinner with the Dean,” for recipients of a fellowship designed to promote “diversity” at […]