#MeToo, Believing Survivors, and Cooperative Digital Communication

The #MeToo movement—as it emerges in social interaction and digital communication—is a discursive formation that suggests at least two frames of linguistic analysis. This column seeks to unpack the hashtag’s emergence in co-oxygenated social interaction, its transformation through digital communication, and closes with brief thoughts on its limitations for transformative social justice change.

Government Of, By, and For the Trolls

The United States and the world have now spent two years trying to figure out how to deal with an anti-social president. The task holds even more import over the next two years as Democrats and Never Trump Republicans consider how to challenge an incumbent president in 2020. Formulating an effective strategy should start by recognizing the ways Trumpian discourse adheres to prototypical “trolling” behavior and responding accordingly.

ASA at the 117th AAA Annual Meeting

Members of the Association of Senior Anthropologists (ASA) will remember the 117th AAA Annual Meeting for several reasons. First and foremost was place and time: San José, when some of the worst forest fires in US history were destroying large swathes of California.

Fighting America, One iPhone at a Time

While those infuriated with Nike in the United States were busy cutting out the swooshes from their Nike apparel and setting them on fire, some in Turkey have been smashing iPhones to protest US President Donald Trump, and calling for a new world order.

Witnessing “Zero Tolerance” at the Border

With what Ruth Behar refers to as ambivalent connections to our one-time homelands, we arrived at the United States courthouse in downtown El Paso, Texas on a hot afternoon and witnessed the Trump Administration’s “zero tolerance” policies in action.

Top Articles of 2018

From critical reflections on the discipline and experiences of it, to grappling with fake news and social media through an anthropological lens, to discussions on race and diversity in the anthropological imagination and the United States more broadly, this year’s top articles speak to major political moments and discipline-specific concerns.

Upon This Break, I Build My House

I have a quite uncomfortable visceral reaction when I am asked to speak to how I experience anthropology—and the academy more broadly—as a Black woman. I resent the feeling that the questioner believes that they know the answer before they ask—that they are actually looking for some kind of confirmation of their belief in the promise that a change is gon’ come, within the reality that it ain’t here yet.

Drugs and Uncertainty in Tanzania

In much of the Global South, biomedical markets have been flooded by a massive proliferation of counterfeit pharmaceuticals. The World Health Organization identifies Sub-Saharan Africa as the region most affected by this development, with estimates of drugs thought to be fake ranging from 30–60 percent.

She’s Credible—I Don’t Believe Her

While 2018 has been called the year of the woman, in US politics it has been full of contradictions. Women, and particularly women of color, have made their voices heard, winning elections from school board to Senate. And yet, at the highest levels of government, male rage still carries the day.

Mary Strong

November 14, 1947–June 29, 2018 Mary Strong, former president of the Society for Visual Anthropology and professor of anthropology at Brooklyn College succumbed to cancer on June 29, 2018. Among her many accomplishments she authored numerous journal articles and books examining the frontier between visual arts and human culture. Her most influential book was Art, Nature, […]