Archaeology for the Next Generation

The Society of Black Archaeologists (SBA), founded in 2011, represents the only professional organization that focuses on specifically addressing the concerns of black archaeologists and, more generally, scholars of African descent across the diaspora. Today, the exact number of African Americans employed as archaeologists in America is unknown. Our best estimates can be gleaned from […]

On Editing

One of the most undervalued, but arduous forms of academic work is editing: organizing knowledge, judging quality, finding emergent themes, and forging connections. Editing is a form of synthesis that works at a thematic level beyond the scope of individual research, and it requires a collaborative and sometimes unhappy interaction with authors; it moves beyond […]

Affect and Climate Change

Andean glaciers in Paris collapse the distinction between local and global. [pquote]The procession’s message was clear—2 degrees is not enough to stop the dangerous melting of glaciers in the Andes. The written message placed on the ice exclaimed: “Survival is our priority 1.5 degrees.”[/pquote]It was day six of 2015 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate […]

Flipping the Field

Who’s asking the questions here? Notes from The Field, a series by the Culture & Agriculture section of AAA. Drawing on the experiences and expertise of our members, Culture & Agriculture introduces its “Notes from the Field” series. It is intended as a space for creative, thoughtful reflections on the process of fieldwork that, while […]

Mary Lindsay Elmendorf

April 13, 1917–September 15, 2017 Mary Lindsay Elmendorf passed away in Sarasota, Florida on September 15, 2017. Born 100 years ago in an era when married women stayed home, Elmendorf became a dedicated activist in promoting human rights and equal opportunity for all. These interests began in college and she vigorously pursued them throughout her […]

Anthropology and the Rashomon Effect

A reflection on group fieldwork. There is a high-fever-pitch limbic sensation of simultaneously registering something you heard or read as wrong, and the antsy, itchy, compulsion to raise your hand, right there, everyone in the room as your witness. You might write a comment or review, maybe draft an article, or even embark on a […]

Anthropology Matters! in Brief

Anthropology News invited members to report on the AAA Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, from reflections on a panels, to gonzo-style reporting, to anthropological impressions of the District.  On “Detained on Trumped up Charges: Migrants and the Ascendant US Security-State” Fiona Murphy 8:00 a.m. Wednesday morning, November 29—After a jetlagged night, I wake in the […]

Midwives, Comadronas, and Doctors in Guatemala

The NAPA-OT Field School Guatemala is a highly stratified country scarred by the civil war carried out against the Mayan population from the 1960s through the 1990s and violence is still tangible in Guatemala. Although about half of all births take place in hospitals (most in urban areas), Guatemala has a high rate of Caesarian […]

On Bioculturalism and Tilting at Windmills

During the 2017 AAA Annual Meeting, after an excellent neuroanthropology session organized by Daniel Lende and Greg Downey, I mused about a shift in the field. To a packed room, outstanding speakers presented sophisticated theoretical models backed by ethnographic and biological evidence, and no one felt it necessary to justify or even flag bioculturalism. The presenters were simply […]

Refugees and Police Violence in Calais

An anthropologist reflects on ethical responsibility and everyday violence. Sitting on a bench in a beautiful town-center park in Calais, we speak to a number of Ethiopian refugees who tell us they are worried about further confrontation with the police. I am volunteering with a British NGO as part of my fieldwork, and, accompanied by […]