Indigenous Peoples’ Day Part II

Bernard Perley © 2017 Bernard Perley is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where he teaches courses in linguistic anthropology and American Indian studies. He collaborates with colleagues and American Indian community members on language maintenance and revitalization projects in and around the city of Milwaukee as well as the state […]

Ethics and Auld Lang Syne

The beginning of a new year provides an opportunity to reflect on the challenges and successes of years past in an effort to better guide the present. This year, NAPA members have particularly good occasion to reflect on our Ethical Guidelines for Practitioners. The guidelines, which were designed to acknowledge common ethical practice for all anthropologists […]

Jeffrey Jay Schultz

September 25, 1949–January 11, 2018 Jeffrey Jay Shultz died peacefully on Thursday, January 11, 2018 in San Diego, CA. He will be remembered by his many friends and colleagues as a person who was incredibly kind and generous, who devoted much of his time to mentoring young scholars and creating inventive new programs for undergraduates, […]

Rebecca J. Tolen

January 14, 1959–August 28, 2017 Anthropology lost one of its finest editorial visionaries with the untimely passing of Rebecca J. Tolen on August 28, 2017. For most of her career, Tolen served as sponsoring editor for Indiana University Press, where she worked for 17 years. She opened her own editorial business, Textworks Editorial services, in […]

Mattison Mines

January 18, 1941–February 25, 2016 I was deeply saddened to hear of the passing of my friend and teacher, Mattison Mines on February 25, 2016.  More than anyone else I knew at University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) in the late 1980s, Mines understood the impermanence of life, about which we talked often, usually when […]

Paradoxes of Eventfulness in Trump’s First Year

Trump’s first year was, if nothing else, eventful. It was so eventful that, in the onslaught of broken norms and sabotaged institutions, it is impossible to give each violation its due recognition.

Early Fieldwork at the Beijing Farmers’ Market

Now that I’ve passed tenure review, published a book, cemented my teaching skills, and learned how to be a productive member of a college committee, I feel confident, self-assured, and filled with certainty about every aspect of my career as a professor. The same certainty extends to research and fieldwork. From choosing a topic to […]

Anthropology in Dangerous Times

In Athens, Greece, on December 31, 1967, eight months after the overthrow of the constitutional monarchy by the military junta on April 21, 1967, armed and uniformed men entered the building that housed the Social Sciences Centre, Athens and carted out boxes full of papers and books. What was contained in these boxes? Where did […]

Living the Council on Anthropology and Education Mission

What does it mean to be an educational anthropologist in these times? That was one of the questions posed by the Council on Anthropology and Education’s (CAE) Mission Committee at its Town Hall meeting at the 2017 American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting in Washington, DC. The Town Hall was one of many venues at the […]

Graduate Student Paper Prize Winner

“The Neighborhood School Stigma: School Choice, Stratification, and Shame” Over the past decade, social scientists have methodically documented the profound effects of unprecedented charter school growth in urban districts in the United States: stratification. An exodus of students from traditional neighborhood schools to charter schools has driven this growth, creating troubling numbers of vacant seats as […]