“Sometimes an Action Is Ripe to Happen”

“What was the vision for AFA at its founding?” I ask. Naomi Quinn’s (one of three founders of AFA) response was simple: “We three just filled a hole we thought needed filling.”

Skill and Care in Horse Racing’s Labor Hierarchy

The Culture & Agriculture Sensorium explores the intersections between sensory experiences, agri-food systems, and the socio-political conventions surrounding food production. In this installation, Rebecca Richard explores the role of touch in the care of race horses and the place of this skill within horse racing’s labor hierarchy.

Nature at the Intersection

In today’s world, where the tentacles of science delve into our humanity in ways most of us could only imagine a generation ago, the space that falls at the intersection between the biological and social sciences has become more critical than ever to operationalize.

Scharlette Holdman

Scharlette Holdman, anthropologist and pioneering opponent of the death penalty, died on July 12, 2017. She was born on December 11, 1946, in Memphis, Tennessee. During the 1960s she became an activist registering black voters in the South, but her opposition to the death penalty became the focus of her activism and life’s work.

2018 AfAA Student Paper Awards

We are pleased to announce the winners of the 2018 Association for Africanist Anthropology (AfAA) Student Paper Awards. Once again, we received strong submissions for both awards and have been impressed with the focus and quality of the research.

Barbara J. Price

Barbara J. Price, a significant sociocultural theorist and a unique New York personality, died on February 18, 2016 after a long illness.

Responding to “Fake News” in an Era of Hashtag Leftism

In a post-fact landscape, Trump’s highly effective swipes at “fake news” have repurposed a venerable leftist critical tradition into a political bludgeon to which progressives have no real answer, other than to defend a handful of corporate entities as torchbearers of democracy and consensual factual reality. What is needed is an approach that speaks to the real problem, which is that the relentless expansion of capitalized digital media (including but not limited to ‘the news’) is deeply anti-social, and thus anti-democratic. This is a position that spans our political and class spectrum in unexpected ways, as I examine in this article. Ironically, a renewed leftist skepticism of ‘the media’ is thus both necessary to our moment, and potentially an interesting point of political convergence.

What Is This Lahu Thing Called Love?

As the music video begins, we see a young man waiting anxiously, peering through a gate. A young woman appears at the top of a set of outdoor stairs, opens a gate, and joins the young man as the first lyric, Aw vi pa o naw hta ha ja (elder brother [common reference for a boyfriend or spouse] I love you very much) appears on the screen.

Love

©Bernard Perley Cite as: Perley, Bernard. 2019. “Love.” Anthropology News website, January 28, 2019. DOI: 10.1111/AN.1077