Posting at the Margins

“Okay, let’s start the memes,” posted a member of a community Facebook page in the town of Playa del Carmen, shortly after the first presidential debate concluded. Within minutes, the comments section of the post filled with hilarious, insulting, insightful, and downright offensive memes making fun of the five (currently four) presidential candidates.

Concha Delgado-Gaitán Presidential Fellows Put CAE’s Mission into Practice

Each year, the Council on Anthropology and Education (CAE), a section of the American Anthropological Association (AAA), supports early career educational anthropologists through the Concha Delgado-Gaitán Presidential Fellows Program. Concha Delgado Gaitán is an educational anthropologist whose contributions to the field of Anthropology and Education have been recognized and have earned her many awards, including the George and Louise Spindler Award.

Culture and Mind in Moral Development in China

Why don’t Chinese socializers want their children to be compassionate and altruistic, or, at least, not too much? Why don’t young children share things in an egalitarian fashion, despite being told to do so by teachers and parents? Do these singleton children take for granted that everything belongs to them, or do they learn to negotiate ownership disputes and establish fairness rules? Are these children self-centered “little emperors” or are they well-disciplined students? My book, The Good Child: Moral Development in a Chinese Preschool examines these and other puzzling questions I encountered during my fieldwork in Shanghai, from 2011 to 2012.

The Fallacy of Equating Gun Violence with Mental Illness

“Every time one of these shootings happens, it puts us three steps backwards,” Paula said to me during my first summer of preliminary fieldwork in 2012. Her concern stemmed from media discourse following the Aurora, Colorado mass shooting at a midnight movie theater screening of The Dark Knight Rises. Paula, a staff member at Vista, a New Orleans-based organization that provides various mental health programs for individuals with mental illness and their family members, has good reason to be concerned about how mass shootings, like the one in Aurora, portray individuals with mental illness as dangerous and violent, further exacerbating existing stigma that individuals with mental illness face daily. This discourse further discourages individuals from using such services because they might be seen as dangerous or violent.

Zombie Tourism, Cliff Walks, and Skydiving

Contributing editor Carrie Hough interviews CSAS Board Member Adam Kaul about Leisure and Death: An Anthropological Tour of Risk, Death, and Dying, which he co-edited with Jonathan Skinner.

“They Arrange Human Beings like Sardines”

Since 2013, over 725,000 migrants have fled their homes in sub-Sahara Africa for Europe.  Many of these migrants traveled to Sicily, the southern entry point to the European Union, from Libya, crossing the Mediterranean on unseaworthy boats.

Changes in the Field

I am writing these “Notes from the Field” in a liminal place of searching for a new fieldwork site: grappling with philosophies regarding the greater good and news of anthropological import as well as my own tragic subjectivity. This personal struggle is also an ethical dilemma that stands at the heart of anthropological theory.

Where Does Success Start?

In today’s academic environment, community colleges face a combination of challenges that make establishing a relevant and meaningful identity somewhat difficult. These challenges include the question of what we specifically want to define as our community college brand and how we can make that brand fit the needs of the greatest number of today’s students.