Conversation, Not Coffee, is What the Heart Wants

Masculinities and Femininities of Public Space Coffee changed the public landscape in the 15th century when it started to make its journey from Yemen to the wider Middle East. The port town of Mocha in Yemen played a leading role in allowing coffee to embark upon new lands.  With a strategic location by the Red […]

Silenced Prejudices and the Gynecological Encounter

Health is the new social. Across academia, public health arena and healthcare, and even the lives of people, health is an exhaustively viable yet precariously dense notion that is operative in complex forms through conceptions, metaphors, globalizing forces, and life-changing or life-threating realities. My anthropological research about the relevance and impact of sexuality disclosures by […]

Notes from the Section Leadership: ASAP sessions at the IUAES in Dubrovnik (May 2016)

The Association for the Anthropology of Policy (ASAP) contributed three sessions to the recent May meeting of the International Union of the Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences in Dubrovnik, Croatia. This is part of the ASAP effort to find venues beyond the American Anthropological Association to discuss anthropological approaches to policy, especially to enable better contact […]

Should Endangered Languages Be Saved?

The exact number of languages spoken in the world today is unknown, but it is undisputed that the number is declining at a high and accelerating rate.  Two sets of statistics are commonly reported.  First, of the approximately 6000 languages currently spoken, somewhere between 50% and 90% will have become extinct by the end of […]

SPA/Robert Lemelson Foundation Fellow Feature

My dissertation research looks at the implementation of an alternative treatment model for psychosis in Berlin, Germany. A local community health organization is experimenting with dialogic practice, a psychotherapeutic approach that includes social network therapy, home visits for clients, and the inclusion of peer specialists (individuals with lived experience as patients in the mental health […]

A Taste of the Basque Country

My first trip to the Basque Country, an ethnic nation straddling northwest Spain and southwest France, was not academic in nature; I was there with my partner David to spend two weeks bicycling through the Pyrenees Mountains along the Bay of Biscay. However, since you can never take the anthropologist out of the anthropologist, and […]

A Tale of Two Museums

Among Basques, it used to be “the anthropologist as hero.” By the turn of the new millennium it was “the architect as hero.” Two museums embody the transition: the ethnographic museum of San Telmo in San Sebastian (which homes the archeological findings and ethnographic implements discovered by the two patriarchs of Basque archeology and ethnography, […]

Edited Out of History

How the Absence of Black and Brown Children from the Historical Record Could be Hazardous to Your Health When Lewis Hine took a job as the photographer for the National Child Labor Committee’s (NCLC) campaign to end child labor in 1908, he wanted to change the hearts and minds of Americans by showing the exploitive […]

The Future of Anthropological Local Practitioner Organizations

More anthropologists today opt out of academia, as academic jobs become scarce and criticisms of the ivory tower deepen. Some of these applied anthropologists may feel isolated or struggle to achieve success in their workplace. In such cases, Local Practitioner Organizations (LPOs) can bring together professionals to foster community and provide guidance. LPOs typically provide […]

Why Are People on the Move?

At the 2016 Folklife Festival AAA asks what objects you would take with you if you suddenly had to move and how you would cope with new surroundings.   What would you take with you if you suddenly had to move? A photo? Cell phone? Passport? #TakeItOTM   When moving, how do you cope with […]