#Adulting and the Disordered State of American Adulthood

[pquote]It is a word apt for the state of social adulthood in the US, where a long-eroding set of markers from the twentieth century are collapsing into a disordered adulthood, fertile with possibility and risk.[/pquote]In 2016, the Oxford Dictionary shortlisted the noun-turned-verb-turned-gerund “adulting” for its Word of the Year designation. Oxford defined adulting as “the practice […]

Philip R. DeVita

Philip R. DeVita, professor emeritus, the State University of New York at Plattsburgh, died on November 17, 2017, in Plattsburgh, NY.

Lloyd Miller

Born in Duluth, MN, on December 17, 1938, Lloyd Miller was a kind soul, a thoughtful academic, and an accomplished individual.

Recap of 2017 EAS at the AAA Annual Meeting

The Evolutionary Anthropology Society had another successful year in 2017 and a great showing at the 116th American Anthropological Association meetings held in Washington, DC, in December. The EAS sponsored five sessions, including a roundtable session—chaired by Melanie Martin and organized by Wesley Allen-Arave—on non-academic career pathways for undergraduate and graduate students with anthropology degrees (access […]

SUNTA Prize Announcements

The 2018 Anthony Leeds Prize in Urban Anthropology The Leeds Prize is awarded each year by the Society for Urban/National/Transnational/Global Anthropology (SUNTA) for the outstanding book in urban, national and/or transnational anthropology published in 2017. The prize is named in honor of the late Anthony Leeds, a distinguished pioneer in urban anthropology. The prize is […]

Go Anthros!

Why doesn’t every one of us enthusiastically cheer the American Anthropological Association, which is rightfully our imagined community?

Social and Chemical Life in Mexico City

The most prevalent form of lead exposure in Mexico City today is culinary; lead glazed ceramic dishes that are prized within families. Lead glaze makes the dishes shine and the food taste sweeter, and the enormous ollas (pots) that hang on kitchen walls connect current generations to past and future family celebrations. What if anthropology could tell the broader story of what these pots do, and their effects, by intertwining their social and chemical lives? Our bioethnographic project, Mexican Exposures (MEXPOS), seeks to do just that; we insist that, to understand lead exposure and working-class life in Mexico City, we need to keep glaze, sweetness, celebrations, and toxicity together.

Demystifying the Annual Meeting Submission Review Process

As the April 16 deadline approaches, it’s time to consider how you would like to participate in the Annual Meeting and compose your proposals. Whether you decide to submit a paper, gallery (poster), workshop, oral presentation session, or roundtable we encourage you to keep our peer review process in mind. Submissions are reviewed and ranked […]

An Anthropology of North America for the World

As two junior faculty members with precarious positions as visiting associate professor (David) and postdoc (Megan), and respective research among white and Latinx working-class populations on the East and West coasts, we have been asking ourselves what particular interventions an anthropology of North America can and should make in the discipline and beyond. Why might this particular regional grouping be good to think with at this point in history?