Call for SAW Book Prize Nominations

The Society for the Anthropology of Work is seeking nominations for its 2019 book prize. The SAW Book Prize will be awarded this year to a single- or co-authored monograph (not an edited collection) published during the last three years.

Teaching Isn’t All We Do

Although community college faculty typically teach five courses per term and are expected to engage in a significant amount of committee work, many of us still find the time to engage in research. That research can result in college-wide, national, or even international presentations or articles in publications like Practicing Anthropology or American Anthropologist, as […]

Accepting the Distinguished Scholar Award on behalf of Saba Mahmood

It is hard for me to get my head around the tragedy of the fact that Saba Mahmood could not be here to accept this award she so richly deserves in person. In one sense, this award marks something we already know about Mahmood’s work—its path-breaking distinction in the anthropology of the Middle East.

Letting Go and Holding On, Documenting Hope in Postwar Guatemala

When Beti asked her twelfth-grade students to consider Guatemala’s contemporary challenges, their suggestions quickly filled the board. In large letters, their words loomed like storm clouds: corruption, violence, extortion, threats, robberies, assaults, exploitation, discrimination.

Making, Holding, and Guarding as Spatial Politics of Healing

Beginning with a statement of non-attachment to fixed space—a clear indication of her preference to speak in terms of relationality rather than spatiality—Maya described the conditions for what she believed to be an optimal healing space for Black people. It must be safe and welcoming, and further, it is one of her duties as a healer to hold it. Maya is an affiliated practitioner of the new up-and-coming Black-owned wellness café in Brooklyn where I have been conducting fieldwork.

#EleNão vs. the Women We Are Missing

While the mainstream media villainized the Bolsonaro voters, presenting them as either the entreguista economic elite, ready to offer its natural resources to the old colonial powers, or as people full of hate and anger, a closer look at this electorate allows one to notice nuances among supporters and also remind us that votes are, in the end, the currency that people exchange to meet their needs.

Conversations across Generations, Part Two

During the 2018 AAA conference in San José, CA, several members of the Association of Senior Anthropologists participated in a conversation with a few younger anthropologists who recently completed or were in the process of completing their doctorates.

A Fieldpoem for World Poetry Day

The difference between a poem and an ethnographic poem is fieldwork. My ethnographic poems are written based on my field data, and sometimes as part of my field methods: they are attentive to the qualia of social life and the complexities of human experience as encountered in fieldwork.

Museums Matter in the Current Climate of Anti-Black Racism

As a Black woman trained in bioanthropology and dedicated to a career trying to undo the residues of social Darwinism and anti-Black racism in museums, I’m concerned about the present state of popular discourse around Africa and Blackness.