“Hello, Mister Doug!”

The Toughest Job You’ll Ever Love.” When I first encountered this Peace Corps motto as a child in the 1970s, I could not have known that I would join Peace Corps in Armenia, or that the country’s people would make such an impression that I would return there twenty-five years later. Going back to Armenia recently has led me to reflect on my experiences, on the value of Peace Corps, and on anthropological goals.

Mukbang is Changing Digital Communications

Sitting in a home office filled with stuffed animals, South Korean internet celebrity BJ MBRO alternates between taking bites of barbeque chicken and rice. He’s good humored, and he emphasizes his approval of the food by giving thumbs-up, widening his eyes, and speaking in an upbeat, rhythmic manner as if he were a parent trying to persuade a stubborn young picky eater to try the food.

The 2018 John Collier Jr. Award for Excellence in the Use of Still Photography

The Society for Visual Anthropology is pleased to announce that this year’s recipient of the John Collier Jr. Award for Excellence in the Use of Still Photography 2018 will be awarded to Monrovia Modern:Urban Form and Political Imagination in Liberia by Danny Hoffman during the American Anthropology Association Annual Meeting at the SVA Business Meeting on Thursday, November 15.

Tackling Timelessness

Timelessness is cruel because it is dehumanizing. As a mad anthropologist who researches madness, I have spent considerable time tackling timelessness. Timelessness is the name I have given to a phenomenon many researchers have witnessed among people experiencing madness—a broad experience of extranormativity that is predominantly defined and addressed as mental illness in the United States.

Curating Peninsular Destruction

Why is the base of the statue so fascinating for these American teachers, and why did the graduate student find the story interesting enough to share in the first place? Echoes of the Korean War adorn the landscapes of Seoul and South Korea, some more spectacular like the De-Militarized Zone, but most just ordinary sites akin to the statue’s base.

Twitter and the Alarming Case of China’s Borderlands

Earlier this year, journalist Wayne Ma published an article in the Wall Street Journal titled “Marriott Employee Roy Jones Hit ‘Like.’ Then China Got Mad.” This title is important because it could be an equation for any number of articles on Chinese geopolitics in the digital era.

Putting an End to the Rain of Apostrophes

On February 19, 2018, Kazakhstani social media came alive when the government announced a new plan for the Latin-based alphabet for Kazakh. It was the third government plan rolled out in the span of a year.

Catering Ghana’s Agricultural Development

That lunch turned out to be the first of many meals that left me asking questions. Since 2014, as part of my research on biotechnology and agricultural development in Ghana, I have attended dozens of development programs throughout the country. These programs—events, workshops, trainings—are impressive microcosms of so-called development efforts. They are where farmers, government officials, development practitioners, NGO program officers, and the occasional anthropologist share spaces, ideas, and meals.

Black Removal in South Central Los Angeles

This conversation takes place with two ethnographers of Los Angeles: Juli Grigsby and Damien Sojoyner. In this short piece, we discuss the impact of gentrification and its insidious process removing of Black communities through the building of rail infrastructure.

Children in Cages, with Guns

The death toll of schoolchildren, the agony of migrant families seeking safe haven, the mistrust of the “justice” system by people of color—anthropologists need to determine their role in clotting these social wounds. One way forward, I think, is the intersubjective empathy at anthropology’s core.