Characterizing Tribal Cultural Landscapes

A Collaborative Approach to Resource Management Historically, federal policy and legislation artificially divide management of natural and cultural resources—a system that doesn’t work on many levels. As an archaeologist working in the historic preservation community, I believe a paradigm shift is happening, and that the Tribal Cultural Landscape (TCL) approach can provide a way to […]

Why You Should Consider Applying for the AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowship

Are you about to complete your PhD and want to do something other than become an adjunct? Or are you perhaps safely tenured but want to make a contribution in government rather than in academia? (“Ask not what your country can do for you…”) Or maybe you’re just curious and would like to find out […]

Ethnographic Fieldwork Equipment That (Hopefully) Won’t Break the Bank: Digital Cameras

Digital Cameras In the first installment of “Ethnographic Fieldwork Equipment That (Hopefully) Won’t Break the Bank,” we examined a series of digital audio recording devices ranging in price from $100 to over $400. This time, we consider both digital single-lens reflex—or DSLR—and mirrorless cameras. As with the previous entry in this four part series, this column […]

Killing Atticus Finch

The literary event of the past summer was undoubtedly the release, on July 14, of Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee. As Joe Nocera argued in the New York Times, the ethics behind the decision to publish were at best questionable. Lee, who is an invalid, effectively lost control over her literary estate when […]

Some Observations about Student Expectations

Even after 15 years of teaching at a community college, the unpredictable nature of our students’ expectations continues to amaze me. I was foolishly convinced that if you offered meaningful information in a fair and interesting way, challenged your students thinking (forcing them to become critical thinkers), and provided a degree of rigor that made each […]

An Epidemiologic Anthropology: Considerations when Employing Mixed Methods

Anthropology versus Epidemiology Anthropologists and epidemiologists have contributed vital knowledge to understanding public health problems such as low birth weight, reemerging disease, mental health, and more. Lively and enduring dialogue on the potential for collaboration between the disciplines was sparked in the ‘80s by Janes et al.’s (1986) Anthropology and Epidemiology and True’s (1990) chapter […]

Connecting Buffalo

My research is aimed at the ways in which people interact with space in downtown Buffalo, New York. I have completed over a year of preliminary ethnographic research and have begun to write my thesis. While conceptualizing my ideas, I am struggling to include the numerous social topics that arise while conducting my work. Although my […]

Introduction to the Series “Social Movements in Japan”

Contributing Editors’ Note: We present our next Society for East Asian Anthropology (SEAA) article series on the social movements that are presently occurring in Japan, with David H Slater (Sophia U) as this series’ curator. What follows is his introduction to the context and content of the four forthcoming reports in this series. The triple […]

Visual Field Notes: Why Draw?

Why Draw? Anthropologist, Carol Hendrickson has been exploring this question with her fieldwork for quite some time. For visual anthropology, drawing can be applied as a method for recording observations and for future reflection toward specific research. I had the opportunity to view Hendrickson’s drawings in person during the Drawing and Painting in the Production […]

Experiential Learning

Teaching Ethnography at the Border Experiential Learning at Colorado College At Colorado College we follow a unique schedule, known as the Block Plan. As part of our Block Plan, our academic year is divided into eight, three and a half week, blocks. Each block students take one course, and it is the only course that […]