Christopher Jones

Christopher Jones passed away on September 3, 2015. Jones was the second of four sons born to Marian Ginn Jones and William Powell Jones of Gates Mills, Ohio. He earned a BA in English literature at Harvard College, and an MA (1963) and PhD (1969) in anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. In Philadelphia Chris […]

In and Out of Japan

2015 was the first time since 1920 that the population of Japan declined, and it is estimated that it will continue doing so. By 2100, 35% of the population will be over 65 years of age. International commentators, from journalists to researchers, recommend Japan increase immigration. And yet, Prime Minister Abe recently stated that Japan’s […]

The Creepiest Clown

While presidential politics dominated newspaper headlines this summer and fall, back pages carried news of a mystifying side show: encounters—or rumors of encounters—with “creepy clowns.” In August, children in Greenville, South Carolina, reported “creepy clowns” trying to lure children into the woods to a lair in an abandoned house by a lake (fears perhaps inspired […]

Human Trafficking in a Time of Crisis

How exaggerated media reports misconceive the realities of migration and displacement.   We’ve joined forces with AAA’s latest public education initiative “World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration” to launch an ongoing series of articles on migration and displacement. Click here for all our World on the Move articles. The current refugee crisis […]

Going Native

Bernard C Perley is an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where he teaches classes in Linguistic Anthropology, American Indian Studies, and Global Studies. His ongoing research focuses on language revitalization in Indigenous communities. He is actively coordinating collaborative projects with colleagues from other disciplines and local American Indian communities to promote language […]

Archaeology in Times of Trump

Archaeologists Against Trump is the name of a Facebook group. It can also be applied to the writings and actions by a large number of archaeologists concerned with the impact of President-elect Trump on archaeology. Reaction by archaeologists has intensified since the election, but there were expressions of concerns prior to that. A 2015 New […]

Heritage Activism Before Trump Inauguration

Call to Immediate Action November 10, 2016 Dear Colleagues, We woke on Wednesday morning to find our world under attack, in a very literal sense. The United States has just elected a man who has made promises to deport our friends and families, to destroy legislation that protects our health, and to eliminate safeguards on […]

116th AAA Annual Meeting Call For Papers

Anthropology matters! is a call across the field to unite in our diversity, to embrace difficulty, be vibrant messmates, and promote the relevance of what anthropology is and does. Anthropology is best at describing the past, exploring the present, predicting the future, and navigating the processes of being and becoming human. Emphasizing the relationship between […]

Ephemeral Encounters and Material Evidence

In 2016, the American Philosophical Society Museum in Philadelphia opened a new exhibition curated by Diana Marsh and Lynnette Regouby, titled “Gathering Voices: Thomas Jefferson and Native America.” Writing from my perspective as an advisor to that exhibition, I share some reflections on the challenges of interpreting Indigenous traditions captured in colonial collections. Material Evidence […]

Displacing Community

In Baltimore development isn’t just about “business getting built”—it’s also about community relations.   We’ve joined forces with AAA’s latest public education initiative “World on the Move: 100,000 Years of Human Migration” to launch an ongoing series of articles on migration and displacement. Click here for all our World on the Move articles. As I […]