Anthony (Tony) Dwight Fisher

Anthony (Tony) Dwight Fisher passed away on March 8, 2018 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada at the age of 86.  He was a professor at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada between 1965 and 1994, and was a founding member of the Anthropology Department.

Africanist Anthropology Has a Lot to Offer

I knelt on the stiff prayer mat in silence. The keeper of this shrine in southern Togo had asked me to lead prayers and propitiations to the tron (spirits) that morning. I had never before been expected to make formal, public praise to the spirits. I felt unsure and self-conscious. “But I’m Catholic,” I said, lamely attempting to withdraw.

New Sovereignties and the Translation of Clinical Authority

On February 14, 2018, 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. News of the massacre quickly began trending on social media. For the first time since the preceding October after a mass shooting in Las Vegas, the now sadly familiar discourse about gun violence in the United States raised its head to front-page prominence.

How “Fake News” Lost Its Meaning

Collins Dictionary named fake news its 2017 word of the year, an easy choice given the word’s “unprecedented usage increase” of 365 percent over the previous year. Collins defines fake news as “false, often sensational, information disseminated under the guise of news.” But this dictionary definition belies the shifting usage of the word in actual contexts of situation since the 2016 election.

Stepping into the Unknown

The latest in Culture & Agriculture’s Notes from the Field series explores the value of anthropological fieldwork for undergraduate education. “Anthropological fieldwork is a lot like writing your first college term paper. You have no clue what the hell comes next.” —Anonymous Student, Western Illinois University I love doing fieldwork. I chalk this up to […]

Internet Privacy Hogwash

Ever since the early years of the Internet, privacy and public conduct have been hot button issues. Some initial bad experiences taught me and my departmental colleagues that all emails should be treated as public documents, which means they are not the place for expressing opinions about tenure cases or job candidates.

Understanding “Harmful Cultural Practices”

In March of this year, we organized a two-day interdisciplinary workshop, Understanding ‘Harmful Cultural Practices’ at UC Santa Barbara (UCSB). Funded by the College of Letters and Science and the Broom Center for Demography, the workshop brought together evolutionary anthropologists with scholars from across the social and health sciences to foster new dialog about both the origins and drivers of so-called harmful cultural practices, and the design and impact of intervention strategies.

Member Dues, What Are They Good For?

Absolutely everything! As AAA leadership reviews the membership dues structure, this is the perfect opportunity to take a closer look at how dues support the Association.