Sense as Metaphor

In Metaphors We Live By, Lakoff and Johnson (1980) argue that metaphor is like a sense. It structures human experience and guides our understanding of our own and other worlds. Metaphors are passed down, becoming a way for structuring experience—a feeling that guides us through our lives.

Chandler Zausner

Chandler Zausner is an undergraduate at the University of Southern California, where he is pursuing a double major at The School of Cinematic Arts (media arts and practice, ‘20) and USC Dornsife (visual anthropology, ‘20). He is interested in documenting unique, marginalized, and disenfranchised communities and recently traveled to Japan for his first international research project on hikkikomori, a culture-bound syndrome of extreme social withdrawal. This is Chandler’s reflection on some of the challenges he faced.

Christian Cosmopolitics

Anthropologists have begun to take seriously the other-than-human entities at play in the world and in political life. In Earth Beings: Ecologies of Practice Across Andean Worlds, Marisol de la Cadena details “co-laboring” closely with Mariano and Nazario Turpo, a family of ritual practitioners and land-rights activists.

The New Elite’s Battle Against Affirmative Action

What little solace we had from Abigail Fisher losing her anti-affirmative action case against the University of Texas, is now under threat as a new legal case is underway against Harvard University. The current lawsuit that alleges Harvard University discriminates against Asian-Americans student applicants is not a lawsuit claiming “reverse racism” or racism against white people.

Educational Anthropology as a Resource for Teacher Educators

My work as a second-grade teacher was strongly influenced by the sociocultural and anthropological perspectives embedded in my teacher preparation. While traditional approaches to education center a teacher’s intentions and goals for the classroom, I strove to see my students from their perspective.

Academic Games

In 1947, the British writer Stephen Potter published a slim volume called The Theory and Practice of Gamesmanship: Or the Art of Winning Games Without Actually Cheating, ushering the term gamesmanship into the English language. In later books, Potter extended his theories and recommendations beyond the formal world of sports to include every aspect of human life.

A Repository for the Common Good

Rates of academic and professional publishing continue to climb—each year some 1.3 million articles are published in scholarly titles. Yet despite that massive output, we know that the products of anthropological knowledge include more than what’s captured in peer-reviewed journals.

Podcasting the Smithsonian Folklife Festival

The day was hot. The lively sounds of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival surrounded us—speakers presenting on stage, a parade of Catalonian giant puppets, passersby chatting about what to eat for lunch, and music from an Armenian avant-garde jazz band off in the distance.

Palmyra Jackson

Palmyra Jackson first joined the AAA in July 2017 as a summer intern after completing her BA in both cultural anthropology and humanities for teaching at Seattle University.