Transitions within Public Sector Anthropology

Anthropologists have long studied the concept of transitions as it applies to people and their cultures. Transitions can come about through various means but are always accompanied by change. Although we study and read about how other cultures are changing, one thing I have heard less about is how applied anthropologists change as they transition […]

Challenges of Mixed-Method Research

Mixed-method research involves inherent challenges that make it at once more gratifying and more difficult than traditional single-method approaches. By “mixed-method,” I am referring to studies that employ a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods. This approach is a hallmark of most biocultural research, and those of us committed to this approach believe that the triangulation of […]

It’s Not About Sects

As I write this, a coalition of 10 Middle Eastern countries, led by Saudi Arabia, is bombing and blockading Yemen, the poorest country on the Arabian Peninsula and one of the least developed in the world.  Saudi Arabia and its GCC partners are among the wealthiest nations on earth.  In economic terms, Saudi Arabia has […]

The Civil War and How My Family Became White

In 1862, my great-grandfather, William Harkin, was a 27-year old man living in a small village in County Donegal, Ireland. He would have been ten years old at the start of the Great Famine, but was not one of the millions who died or emigrated. Times were still hard in the 1860s, as British rule […]

Preserving Visual Culture

This winter I had the opportunity to tour the Winterthur Scientific Research and Analysis Laboratory at the Winterthur Museum in Winterthur, Delaware. This is the second campus location of the University of Delaware’s (Newark, Delaware) Art Conservation Department. The University of Delaware is one of four art conservation programs in the nation. The main objective […]

Buffalo’s Revival

Buffalo, New York has a long-standing and ill-fated reputation for poverty and crime. It has been named one of the poorest and most recently, dreariest cities in America. However, in recent years Buffalo has been transitioning into a new place of social and economic revival. The memories of a booming, industrial, and successful city no […]

Theory in Public Sector Anthropology

In graduate school, my favorite course was titled “History of Anthropological Theory.” The course readings, which required a critical engagement with works written by Foucault, Geertz, Stoler, and V. Turner (to name a few), were invigorating and encouraged me to think in a new way—one that sought out nuances, peeled back layers, and identified seemingly […]

Religion is not Archaeology

Unless you are hibernating without a cellphone or internet in Siberia, you have heard a lot about ISIS, a.k.a. the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria and its “IS”-related acronyms, in the news for the past year, even on Anthropology News.  People who thought the caliphate was something created for the Disney movie Aladdin have […]

Unfolding of the On the Line Project

“Is this ‘new’ anthropology but ‘old’ art. Or new art woven of the threads of anthropology?” Anthropologist and artist, Susan Ossman posed this question during the installation process of her February 2013 solo art exhibition, On the Line. To date, it is commonly known that artist and anthropologist research can consist of borrowed methods from […]

What’s Biological about Biocultural Research? (Part 1)

Our January column from Bill Dressler harkened to 2005 when, concerned about the absence of an explicit theory of culture in much biocultural research, Bill had written a piece in Ethos entitled “What’s Cultural about Biocultural Research?” While not all of us follow Bill’s approach to the letter, his perspective has been influential in our Biocultural […]