The Conversation

It happens every quarter. The conversation. Students ask us big questions about their futures as anthropology graduates. Sometimes it’s sparked by parents’ concerns. But often it arises as graduation looms, and students get worried about jobs. Their questions? What can I do with anthropology? How do I use anthropology to get the job I want? Did just I make the best—or worst—decision of my life?

Unapologetically Inaccurate

On Sunday, Rami Malek won an Academy Award for portraying Freddy Mercury in the extremely popular Queen biopic Bohemian Rhapsody. In his speech, Malek made the case for the film’s progressive depiction of minorities: “We made a film about a gay man, an immigrant, who lived his life just unapologetically himself. The fact that I’m celebrating him and this story with you tonight is proof that we’re longing for stories like this.”

When We Come to Anthropology, Elsewhere Comes with Us

A glance at my watch revealed that my colleague was already five minutes over his thirty-minute allotment. Students from various cohorts and faculty had gathered in the small lounge shared by sociology and anthropology for our weekly brown bag session.

Online Dissertations

Dissertations are often made available online through, for instance, Proquest. How does this potentially impact the publishing process (of books based on dissertations)?

What Does Diversity and Inclusion Mean?

In the spirit of creating alternatives to capitalism that also recognize the importance of advocating for institutionally marginalized students, I suggest that we ask: What does diversity and inclusion mean to our departments and to our schools?

Can a Transgender Body Be the Body of the Nation?

While the US federal government remained in the longest partial shutdown in history, the Trump administration managed to make headway in its baffling effort to prevent transgender Americans from serving in the military. On January 22 the Supreme Court removed one injunction against the proposed policy that was first introduced this summer. Another injunction against it still remains in place, but likely not for long.

Fieldnotes from the Kitchen Counter

This text appeared in the American Anthropologist submission queue, somehow entered as an anonymous manuscript, which the ScholarOne system is not supposed to permit. It seems to consist of excerpts from the author’s field notes, which is not the kind of thing that American Anthropologist publishes; given the unique perspective it represents, we wanted to find a venue for it, so we present it to you here in Anthropology News.

Bangladesh Garment Workers Strike

More than 50,000 Bangladeshi garment workers went on strike this month to demand a livable wage after the government raised the monthly minimum wage from $53 to only $95, still a global low for the apparel industry. However, the government and factory owners did not raise the wages of the majority of the workers—a four-million strong labor force that is 80 percent female—who fall in the lowest grade.

Is Oklahoma Indian Country?

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case Carpenter v. Murphy on November 27. At issue in the case is whether the roadside ditch in rural Oklahoma where Patrick Murphy murdered George Jacobs is part of the Muscogee Creek Reservation. If the murder took place on the Muscogee Creek Reservation, it would fall under federal jurisdiction. If it was not Indian land, then the state of Oklahoma would have jurisdiction.