Midwives, Comadronas, and Doctors in Guatemala

The NAPA-OT Field School Guatemala is a highly stratified country scarred by the civil war carried out against the Mayan population from the 1960s through the 1990s and violence is still tangible in Guatemala. Although about half of all births take place in hospitals (most in urban areas), Guatemala has a high rate of Caesarian […]

Chinese Medical Pulse Diagnosis

An analogy for biomarkers in medical anthropology research? Should anthropologists include biological measures in our research? Does it make our work somehow more legitimate or scientific when we do? Does including biology necessarily distract us from talking about complex social, historical, and cultural processes? In considering these questions, I began thinking about pulse diagnosis in […]

You Don’t Have to Attend Harvard to Hear Them Speak!

Brookdale Community College has had a long history of attracting guest speakers to its campus. One man in particular, history professor Jack Needles, put Brookdale on the map when it came to inviting well known people to our institution. He was what Jess Le Vine, another history professor who took over this task upon Jack Needle’s retirement, […]

“Free Speech” in Times of Conflict

Lessons from Charlottesville Since the violent events that took place in Charlottesville, VA, this past August, when a white supremacist rally led to the killing of a peaceful counter-protester, there has been a lot of reflection in the media and among legal scholars on the problem of free speech. Does the right to speak still […]

Evolutionary Anthropology Graduate Programs IV

Other West Coast Schools (Part 2) This is the fourth post in a series highlighting US graduate programs in evolutionary anthropology. This installation continues with other West Coast schools outside of California. All programs were asked to answer the 6 questions below. Here, in no particular order, are abbreviated responses from University of Colorado Boulder, […]

What’s in Your Annual Meeting Bag?

Over the summer, AN asked anthropologists what they pack in their field bags. This time, anthropologists share what they’ve packed for the AAA Annual Meeting. Oguz Alyanak Three items stand out in this backpack. First, the Turkish passport. It is not its presence but its absence that I fear—perhaps more than ever today. Second, the evil eye. My mom said to carry it […]

Latinx Communities Organize and Resist

“Dissent in the Post-Truth Era: Latinx Communities Organize and Resist,” coordinated by the indefatigable anthropologist Pat Zavella, sets the pace for our panels at the 2017 AAA meetings. This executive session (Thursday morning) features scholarship grounded in a commitment to doing anthropology in solidarity with the communities we work with as researchers, activists, and partners in […]

Colonialism’s Orchestrated Disasters in Puerto Rico

“María, María, perdí la esperanza, María, María, perdí la esperanza.” I am reminded of these lyrics from the bomba group, Yuba Iré, when I see the pictures and videos of our beloved nation of Puerto Rico in ruins. Some of us had lived through hurricanes before, but nothing had prepared us for this level of […]

SAE at the Annual Meeting

William A. Douglass Distinguished Lecture, Café Europa, Prizewinners, and Fourteen Exciting Panels The 2017 AAA Annual Meeting is fast-approaching, and SAE has a diverse and exciting line-up of panels and events—including our central event, the William A. Douglass Distinguished Lecture, which will take place on Thursday, November 30, 2017 at 7:45 p.m. (Marriott, Coolidge). This […]

Whose Secularity?

Notes from São Paulo’s LGBT Pride Parade The announcement that the theme for the 2017 LGBT São Paulo Pride Parade would be “A Secular State” appeared at once provocative and expected. For the mostly gay and lesbian (but also trans and bisexual) activists with whom I conducted fieldwork in São Paulo from 2011–2013, the issue […]