Changes in the Field

I am writing these “Notes from the Field” in a liminal place of searching for a new fieldwork site: grappling with philosophies regarding the greater good and news of anthropological import as well as my own tragic subjectivity. This personal struggle is also an ethical dilemma that stands at the heart of anthropological theory.

Where Does Success Start?

In today’s academic environment, community colleges face a combination of challenges that make establishing a relevant and meaningful identity somewhat difficult. These challenges include the question of what we specifically want to define as our community college brand and how we can make that brand fit the needs of the greatest number of today’s students.

Transgender Latina Activism in the Current Political Moment

The current political administration poses numerous threats to various minoritized communities in the United States. Anti-Latinx and transphobic sentiments and policy actions are on the rise. Given this state of affairs, one might assume that life is markedly more difficult for transgender Latinxs in the Trump era.

Africanist Anthropology Has a Lot to Offer

I knelt on the stiff prayer mat in silence. The keeper of this shrine in southern Togo had asked me to lead prayers and propitiations to the tron (spirits) that morning. I had never before been expected to make formal, public praise to the spirits. I felt unsure and self-conscious. “But I’m Catholic,” I said, lamely attempting to withdraw.

New Sovereignties and the Translation of Clinical Authority

On February 14, 2018, 17 people were killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. News of the massacre quickly began trending on social media. For the first time since the preceding October after a mass shooting in Las Vegas, the now sadly familiar discourse about gun violence in the United States raised its head to front-page prominence.

Stepping into the Unknown

The latest in Culture & Agriculture’s Notes from the Field series explores the value of anthropological fieldwork for undergraduate education. “Anthropological fieldwork is a lot like writing your first college term paper. You have no clue what the hell comes next.” —Anonymous Student, Western Illinois University I love doing fieldwork. I chalk this up to […]

Understanding “Harmful Cultural Practices”

In March of this year, we organized a two-day interdisciplinary workshop, Understanding ‘Harmful Cultural Practices’ at UC Santa Barbara (UCSB). Funded by the College of Letters and Science and the Broom Center for Demography, the workshop brought together evolutionary anthropologists with scholars from across the social and health sciences to foster new dialog about both the origins and drivers of so-called harmful cultural practices, and the design and impact of intervention strategies.

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part Two)

In Part Two of this series, we have more reflections from the authors of “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, on the limitations and liberatory potential for feminist anthropology to address racialized-sexualized-gendered violence in anthropological (activist) research. PART TWO Maya Berry The recent calls that “justice […]

Reimagining the Maori Haka

In the spring of 2017, my research sabbatical at Waikato University in Aotearoa/New Zealand centered on the extreme over-representation of the indigenous Māori people in the prison system. Nonetheless, I was constantly pulled into the national obsession with rugby and its conspicuous connection to Māori culture. Although well aware that many Māori athletes are rugby […]