Reimagining the Maori Haka

In the spring of 2017, my research sabbatical at Waikato University in Aotearoa/New Zealand centered on the extreme over-representation of the indigenous Māori people in the prison system. Nonetheless, I was constantly pulled into the national obsession with rugby and its conspicuous connection to Māori culture. Although well aware that many Māori athletes are rugby […]

The Politics of Taxes

APLA contributing editor Luzilda Carrillo Arciniega interviewed Ajay Mehrotra, Professor of Law at the Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, about recent US tax reform.

Navigating Health Care Dilemmas in Chicago

The Affordable Care Act is under threat of repeal, and while lawmakers argue over what will replace it if anything, the healthcare policy landscape has already shifted. Entire sectors of the US population—undocumented immigrants and the working poor—were excluded or had limited access to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace to begin with, and they continue to struggle to afford primary health care services and to find treatment for chronic illnesses.

Letter from SEAA President Glenda Roberts

The theme of the summer issue of AN, Anthropological Futures, has been much on my mind as I took up residence in this historic city far from my home in Tokyo. So why does an anthropologist who has spent nearly her entire career in Japan decide to take her sabbatical in France?

The Limitations and Liberatory Potential of Feminist Anthropology (Part One)

In light of their important and timely article, “Toward a Fugitive Anthropology: Gender, Race, and Violence in the Field,” published in Cultural Anthropology, AFA invited authors Maya J. Berry, Claudia Chávez Argüelles, Shanya Cordis, Sarah Ihmoud, and Elizabeth Velásquez Estrada to continue the conversation around decolonizing activist anthropology by centering the embodied experiences of black, brown, and indigenous (queer) women.

Albinism and the Unseen in Tanzania

There are many people in Tanzania—though no one knows exactly how many—with skin that is significantly lighter than others’. Biomedically speaking, they are said to have albinism, a recessively inherited genetic condition that affects melanin production and results in low vision. In recent years, albinism has become the hegemonic conceptualization of light skin, in large part due to medical humanitarianism and deliberate efforts by the postcolonial state and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to make albino a salient category.

Editors Edit

Ilana Gershon asked seven editors for their insights on questions that authors of books commonly ask. Five are press editors (Berghahn, Chicago, Indiana, Princeton, Stanford) and two are series editors.

Feeding Innovation in Business Anthropology

[pquote]Anthropology is a way of seeing and interpreting data, and it inflects everything I do.[/pquote]When I began working as a market research consultant, shortly after receiving my PhD, I knew that I would likely spend a good part of my time translating what I do to my colleagues. What I do now—writing surveys, conducting focus […]

Translanguaging is Everywhere

For over three years now I’ve been keeping a blog about something I call “citizen sociolinguistics”—the work people do to make sense of everyday communication and share their sense-making with others. This is my small way of supporting the Council on Anthropology and Education’s goal to “promote research, policies and practices” that are “close to the voices of the participant communities” and “sensitive to participant experiences and social contexts.”

“Moving On” from the Ongoing

On March 18, 2018, Stephon “Zoe” Clark was shot in his grandmother’s backyard 20 times, at least six in the back, by two Sacramento Police officers. In the resulting community-led protests, shutdowns, and ceremonies, the 23-year-old father of two has been poignantly mourned for the singular person he was, while his name joins the litany of African-American men, women, boys and girls who have been victims of police aggression and homicide.