Making, Holding, and Guarding as Spatial Politics of Healing

Beginning with a statement of non-attachment to fixed space—a clear indication of her preference to speak in terms of relationality rather than spatiality—Maya described the conditions for what she believed to be an optimal healing space for Black people. It must be safe and welcoming, and further, it is one of her duties as a healer to hold it. Maya is an affiliated practitioner of the new up-and-coming Black-owned wellness café in Brooklyn where I have been conducting fieldwork.

#EleNão vs. the Women We Are Missing

While the mainstream media villainized the Bolsonaro voters, presenting them as either the entreguista economic elite, ready to offer its natural resources to the old colonial powers, or as people full of hate and anger, a closer look at this electorate allows one to notice nuances among supporters and also remind us that votes are, in the end, the currency that people exchange to meet their needs.

Conversations across Generations, Part Two

During the 2018 AAA conference in San José, CA, several members of the Association of Senior Anthropologists participated in a conversation with a few younger anthropologists who recently completed or were in the process of completing their doctorates.

Museums Matter in the Current Climate of Anti-Black Racism

As a Black woman trained in bioanthropology and dedicated to a career trying to undo the residues of social Darwinism and anti-Black racism in museums, I’m concerned about the present state of popular discourse around Africa and Blackness.

Black Feminist Science

Archaeologists have the potential to contribute to collective black history and memory, and to help black folks reconstruct their histories from a more politically aware viewpoint. I am a member of a historically disempowered and marginalized group with access to forms of elite knowledge, utilizing social theory and producing knowledge within a field that has traditionally been dominated by white men.  From my position, I am able to rearticulate the stories of the black women in this collection and lend my own critical insights into the history of oppression.

What Ethnology Can Tell Us about the Consequences of Climate Change

Climate scientists predict that accelerated global warming will increase the impacts of extreme weather events such as droughts, typhoons and floods. Such events are likely to have serious social consequences, including famine, displacement, and increased violent conflicts. While these climate events may be becoming more extreme, such events resulting in disasters are not new. It is important to try to understand how human societies with varying livelihoods and vulnerabilities have responded to and invented solutions to such conditions both in the past and the present.

Food for Thought

When I first began working at Eastern Kentucky University in the fall of 2018, I taught a module on food insecurity in order to encourage students to pursue applied projects in our local food system. As I presented the syllabus on the first day of class, I saw a number of raised eyebrows and cocked heads. One student slowed me down: “Dr. Green, what do you mean by ‘food insecurity’?”

Stuff Matters, Especially When You Risk “Everything” for It

Mrs. M. realised she had made a miscalculation staying in her property on the afternoon of March 3, 2011 when water started bulging in through her floor. She had heard the official warning of the oncoming tsunami and knew that the evacuation order was serious. She had every intention of running to higher ground once she collected some belongings. And more importantly, once she found her cat.

Sharing, Wasting, and Tasting in Our Mother Tongue

When I began my fieldwork on sanitation work in Bangalore, India, the city had already suffered two decades of class polarization and environmental degradation, after being marked as a site for low-cost solutions, back-end support, and offshore expansion. So, I should have suspected that the paradoxes of progress would leave me tongue-tied: lost in my mother tongue (Kannada), along with everyone else’s.

Notes from the Section Leadership

The Association for the Anthropology of Policy (ASAP) was formed in 2014. At the last count, we now have over 350 members and are classed as a medium-sized section by the AAA. Our finances remain strong and we have a healthy surplus that we will put to good use, in widening ASAP’s activities and, in particular, supporting graduate students, early career scholars, and attracting those outside academia and those working in disciplines in dialogue with the anthropology of policy to the annual meeting.